It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

WiFi question

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 08:44 AM
link   
Just announced that basic WiFi protocols have been hacked/breeched, potentially giving hackers access to data sent via ANY WiFi router.

Question: would it be possyto use the same access to Upload viruses and other malware to any devices connected to a WiFi router?

Does this mean that, for safety’ sake we should shut down all WiFi routers until a fix is available?




posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:00 AM
link   
a reply to: Bhadhidar

It does not work that way. Wi-Fi protocols were breached when it first was a thing. The ISP I worked for as a tower climber, one of the guys was so crazy good at what he did as a network engineer that he got me free internet by using a certain chipset in his laptop that was able to interact with the router in such a way that he could get it to read off the password that the network had.

You still have to infect the machine to actually get anything done. At most it would be helpful to always make sure your file sharing is turned off, you have nothing set to discover/share, that you keep your routers firmware updated, and that you never go to, click on anything you are not sure of.

I own an ISP now btw. Life is good.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: SR1TX
a reply to: Bhadhidar

It does not work that way. Wi-Fi protocols were breached when it first was a thing. The ISP I worked for as a tower climber, one of the guys was so crazy good at what he did as a network engineer that he got me free internet by using a certain chipset in his laptop that was able to interact with the router in such a way that he could get it to read off the password that the network had.

You still have to infect the machine to actually get anything done. At most it would be helpful to always make sure your file sharing is turned off, you have nothing set to discover/share, that you keep your routers firmware updated, and that you never go to, click on anything you are not sure of.

I own an ISP now btw. Life is good.


How does one go about owning their very own ISP?



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:07 AM
link   
a reply to: Bhadhidar

The recently discovered bug only allows you to communicate via the access point and possibly capture traffic flowing via that device. It will not allow you to infect other machines because of the bug. That is a whole different kettle of fish. Some modems/routers have a setting to prevent inter-device communication too.

If communications are encrypted (SSL, TLS, etc) then you will still have another layer of encryption to break. Hopefully the bug will be patched by the vendors soon.


P.S. It's about time ATS had an encrypted login procedure. ATS is plaintext. Unfortunately.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:14 AM
link   
a reply to: Bhadhidar


Question: would it be possyto use the same access to Upload viruses and other malware to any devices connected to a WiFi router?

Its called a 'man in the middle' (mitm) hack, I think.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:15 AM
link   
a reply to: PokeyJoe

I am not sure about the shameless plug factor here. But look up Suros Wireless - Tx. That's my company.

We operate using LTE as the delivery method instead of LOS Wi-Fi signals or private 5G canopy/motorola stuff or Satellite. We use the carriers towers already there so technically we are already everywhere at all times.

We don't use installers so there are no trucks to run or installers to pay. Equipment arrives plug and play ready to go within days of customers payment.

I could go on, but I simply love what I do and the innovation behind it. I have watched what they claim is the breaking in of WPA2 and I have news for everyone reading, it's not new or news. You can do this at home by creating another Wi-Fi network with same parameters and watch what your PC does or handheld. Do you know which network you actually connected to? You cannot tell until you start seeing weird sh** happening.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:18 AM
link   
a reply to: LightSpeedDriver

There is nothing to fix.

All the idiots did in their video was create a second network with the same name and let the un aware phone try and connect but it tried to connect to both. That's a fault of the handheld/end device, not the WPA2 protocol.

You are not communicating with the actual AP you are trying to spoof. You are confusing the handheld to believe the spoof network is the real one. Even this seems illogical to me to believe it would work as most devices now show the 2nd network as Network (2) to designate it sees something else.

To me, you would literally have to know NOTHING about NOTHING in order to be fooled by this attack. Selling it as a new thing is a con.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:36 AM
link   
a reply to: SR1TX

According to the info, which I have no reason to doubt, the WPA2 protocol IS compromised. This has happened with many protocols in the past and will happen again in the future which is why vendors need to respond quickly. All unencrypted data is visible and sniffable if not protected by another layer.

I understand that they can trick android but they can also install rogue GPS/UMTS stations too as the US (possibly other countries too) has proven. The point being, encrypt everything again for an extra level of security. Man in the middle is possible but not trivial, according to the info I have read.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 09:51 AM
link   
a reply to: LightSpeedDriver

Absolutely, the flaws are in the WPA2 protocol itself.

CERT/CC Reports WPA2 Vulnerabilities


CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC) has released information on Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) protocol vulnerabilities. Exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to take control of an affected system.
The vulnerabilities are in the WPA2 protocol, not within individual WPA2 implementations, which means that all WPA2 wireless networking may be affected. Mitigations include installing updates to affected products and hosts as they become available. US-CERT encourages users and administrators to review CERT/CC's VU #228519.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 10:06 AM
link   
a reply to: theultimatebelgianjoke

How many times can a man say something?

Spoofing a network and tricking a handheld is NOT NEWS it does not matter WPA2 or otherwise.

There is nothing about this that concerns me in any way. Most networks that are secure don't even broadcast they are there. Then consider the fact that there are routers that already auto correcting channel spacing and the device will ALWAYS connect to the strongest signal. This is the thing these snake oil hackers are not telling you. You would have to be the WEIRDEST looking person in a parking lot or in front of someones house with a broadcast unit HOPING you can lock on/get in the right direction or someones handheld/connected devices and then perform whatever spoof they think they are performing by "tricking a handheld - oxy moron - because they are known to be dumb already in the networking world" into thinking that's the network signal it wants to try and attach to.

It simply does not work that way. The end device is not going to be confused by joe blow sitting in his car outside turning his phone or w/e into a mobile hot spot and trying to get other things to connect to it. There is no reason, unless he is broadcasting WAY louder - not likely - that any device would need to disconnected from their current AP and try and connect to the new one. Most handhelds now are designed to maintain their connection - at all costs - to the current AP they reside on. Not to mention, this is only the beginning even if pulled off.

What happens when someone smarter than the average bear notices the hops he was going through if on a switched network are gone and now there is just the 1 host? Could the device you are even trying to use to spoof, handle an entire company at once of traffic? Or would it crash instantly, is it setup to take on 500 users? Etc etc etc.

i could go on but I have to get to work.




posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 10:11 AM
link   
a reply to: SR1TX

Here is an extract from the researchers paper :


All protected Wi-Fi networks use the 4-way handshake to generate a fresh session key. So far, this 14-year-old handshake has remained free from attacks, and is even proven secure. However, we show that the 4-way handshake is vulnerable to a key reinstallation attack. Here, the adversary tricks a victim into reinstalling an already-in-use key. This is achieved by manipulating and replaying handshake messages. When reinstalling the key, associated parameters such as the incremental transmit packet number (nonce) and receive packet number (replay counter) are reset to their initial value. Our key reinstallation attack also breaks the PeerKey, group key, and Fast BSS Transition (FT) handshake. The impact depends on the handshake being attacked, and the data-confidentiality protocol in use. Simplified, against AES-CCMP an adversary can replay and decrypt (but not forge) packets. This makes it possible to hijack TCP streams and inject malicious data into them. Against WPATKIP and GCMP the impact is catastrophic: packets can be replayed, decrypted, and forged. Because GCMP uses the same authentication key in both communication directions, it is especially affected.


PDF



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 12:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: SR1TX
a reply to: Bhadhidar

It does not work that way. Wi-Fi protocols were breached when it first was a thing. The ISP I worked for as a tower climber, one of the guys was so crazy good at what he did as a network engineer that he got me free internet by using a certain chipset in his laptop that was able to interact with the router in such a way that he could get it to read off the password that the network had.

You still have to infect the machine to actually get anything done. At most it would be helpful to always make sure your file sharing is turned off, you have nothing set to discover/share, that you keep your routers firmware updated, and that you never go to, click on anything you are not sure of.

I own an ISP now btw. Life is good.



Uhhhh. It's terrifying if you own an ISP because the crap you are talking about was regarding WEP. Not WPA/2. You own a telco and you don't evn know wireless protocol basics? Jesus christ.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 03:02 PM
link   
The main part to remember here is that you need to be in range of the wifi network in order to attack.
It also needs existing wireless sessions of other devices, these are the connections that can be compromised.
I'm not sure to what degree it can actively influence, but it's certainly possible to monitor all network activity of said connection



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 06:35 PM
link   
a reply to: hombero

What does the protocol matter?

Spoofing is Spoofing is Spoofing.




top topics



 
4

log in

join