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Firearms resolution to soon be passed.

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posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

No you've not shown us that your idea is viable. Nice try however.




posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:08 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: TerryDon79

I showed you that they are developing and it is already iin action but you deny it. the very youtube video I showed you and it was just last year.


Lots of things are in R&D. A lot don’t go past that stage due to it being UNVIABLE, not cost effective, or simply don’t work.

YouTube videos don’t mean squat. There are YouTube videos of flat earth, nibiru, the spaghetti monster and tellytubbies. All of them are about as believable as your (not) soon to be passed firearm tech.
edit on 1512018 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Indeed, as someone who works in a science industry. Very little of the things in R&D get near the pipeline for production.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: TerryDon79

Indeed, as someone who works in a science industry. Very little of the things in R&D get near the pipeline for production.


Some people assume that anything in R&D will automatically get put into mainstream production.

Just look at some of the concept cars from BMW, Mercedes and Nissan over the years (just to name a few). R&D->Concept->Nothing happened with them apart from some of the parts. The actual thing itself wasn’t worth it (for whatever reason).

Like I’ve stated before. The idea is good, but that’s about as far as it can go with the technological limitations (and the people who currently own non smart tech firearms) we currently have.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Sometimes its a really dumb idea, sometimes the technology is not mature enough, and sometimes, it just not work. Or perhaps it gets sunken by an executive.

Many reasons. None the less, it never happens.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

I wont disagree to that. But the videos onthe wenbistes are showing viable working handguns and shotguns that cant wok if separated from the ring/key for it to fire.

Not only that the company in Germany does in fact have a working non firing if it is more than ten inches from the officers active trigger device and a GPS traceable hand gun. It is in case of a gun is taken from a police officer and cannot be used against him. They are planning to sell these guns for the US police market not for Germany or EU.

S&W wont say much but that they too are developing the same type of gun to sell to the public or police they will file their patents and have them on the market within 60 days of when the Govt invokes their power to regulate guns for sale in this country. They wont take away our rights to own them or have them just they want to control them and their best way is electronically. Lucky for us there are plenty of older guns going around unless they go after them.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:25 PM
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Never mind.
edit on 15-1-2018 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

yeah I am just a little peaved at terryDon and would just love to talk face to face with him and not through a key board.

I apologize.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Neighbour. What websites are these?

You are missing the point. One companies tech, may not be the same as another , and will not be freely applied to all guns.

Again, you've proven nothing. Beyond that you revert to threats of violence when you are loosing.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Lay off the pain meds then. You are thinking in a clouded manner.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Terry I am sorry for getting hot headed. I had to log out for a few and cool off. Please forgive me.

Not that you are entirely true. I know part of what you say is true.

It is the things I know and have been privy too that are true you can't verify and i have.

but you could just call S&W, Colt give them your Press ID number and you can speak to them as I have.

Just let's call a truce, OK?



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

I haven't had any in a couple of weeks. I need them but Virginia just past a law forbidding Codeine or any opioid to be given unless you are hospitalized.

I might be a little edgy from not having what I have had since September. It takes more than two weeks to get clean from them.

So yes I am a little bit off but I know the truth of what I have shared.

I am glad it didn't happen as fast as I thought it would but when earmarks came up last week and we discussed them I could see that, that would be the way they could pass such legislation, and if we want our guns to be free without the govt seeking them, following them or disabling them, action will need to be taken.


edit on 15-1-2018 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

You’ve proven nothing. And no, I don’t take the word of someone who can’t get basic facts correct, then wants to get into a fight because they get angry at being proven wrong.

Thing is, this could have been a good “what if” thread. Instead, you’ve tried stated things as facts when they’re demonstrably not.

You’ve been proven wrong on many things. You’ve changed your story many times. This really should be in LOL.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Asa chronic pain sufferer (an arthritic condition) that is not excuse.

I return to.

Post
the
Proof.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

there is verifiable facts in what I have said. I gave you links to companies as late as 2016 and 17 developing. But have you checkout what the tech companies are planning and doing to make everything smart tech.

Right now you are trackable by your smart phone, it is small enough in those hand held computers you hold to your head or plug your ear piece into.

Any hacker can find you/ I use software to keep them out of my computer haven't had a problem with with malware, spyware or any other intrusive software. I have installed it on my phone as well.

If I want the same program can hide my IP address and bounce it around the world. But so far I have no reason to hide my actual IP. soon you gun will be traceable via apps from phones and computers. You just don't want to see it. But that is the way of the snowflake future.

Good night my nemesis.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

IF you could verify them. YOU could have done so. That is your job, as the bringer of this idea.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

R&D means just that. Research and development. It doesn’t mean it’s going to go pass that stage.

You have been wrong on fundemental things.

-GPS can’t pass through humans. That means a chip in a grip won’t work.
-There aren’t 2000 active US satellites. There’s not that many worldwide.
-GPS tech isn’t reliable enough to be used in the way you say it is.
-There’s no way it will be enforceable as there’s not a register of who owns what current firearm and where they are.

The main problem, the BIGGEST problem, is the tech just isn’t good enough for it to work.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

NRA says there is no viable technology to secure firearms from being fired without proper authorization which is a key, or electronic device. Even if magnetized it makes the gun useless. But there is.

www.armatix.us... Now this is just prototypes their market is America not the EU.

they have quick lock known as a wireless key, they have base lock systems to keep guns form being stolen and if they are the system can send a call to the local police and it wont fire because they still need a key to make it work.

They make blocking devices that if they are some how fired they would blow up in the purps face killing them, because it fits in the barrel. My Step Dad used to use a block of wood on a string in his shotgun so if someone stole it they almost never look in the barrel, they load and fire it, it would kill them if they ever did steal his.

There is their iW Watch, this Smart System consists of a radio-controlled watch that is responsible for gun access and use. A Smart System gun will only shoot if it is within range of this watch. It is possible to release the safety mechanism via the radio controlled watch activated by means of a PIN code. As soon as the gun loses radio contact with the watch – e.g. if it is knocked out of the shooter’s hand or in case of loss, theft, etc. – it automatically deactivates itself. Quoted straight from the source.

Now what you don't know is S&W's R&D Dept has been doing since 1997 and lot longer that Armatix. But one thins S&W got going for it they have not been so public about their tech, and from the few questions I got actually answered and not the run a round these few things I have deduced, and Colt is on the same track. Tarus has nothing.

Here is what I found out from S&W, 1) they have developed the same type of system as the watch above but it is active up to 16 inches form the person holding the guns activation device. It is a bracelet or something they put in their front pocket or clip on their belt. 2) they have developed a system to track a stolen gun via chip in the gun (not talking yet about gps) this is just a chip that has all the vital info on it as to who owns the gun, their address and SS# (you'll have foil wrap this gun to keep a scanner from reading the ship. It is much like the one on your credit card. 3) they have an actual li-ion battery with a gps chip in it. As long as the battery has a charge they can track it from their special service much like life lock watches your credit they can monitor your guns travel. Now that is a little scary but they have the tech developed. And 4) they have developed fire arms from being fired remotely via a small integrated circuit that is also kept active by the battery. the bad thing is the safety factor is that if the battery goes dead the device (not sure if it is a sliding pin or small plate of metal) falls into place and will not let the gun be fired. It is also a feature that is activate when the guns safety is turned on.

Realistically, I have yet to see a whole gun with any or all of it (not even a picture or a drawing). That is all hush hush for now. I do not doubt one bit about any of it. I have a very close friend who makes rockets for Israel. Some of the tech in these smart rockets work in the same fashion, they have to be inside the launching tubes to active and will not explode by accident because they are not active to explode until they enter the tube (some sort of chip reader in the launcher or launchers. and even if the enemy was to steal the whole launching unit and the rockets, it has a device that only certain member of the military have, and then they have to be within a certain distance for the launching unit to fire the missiles. This is all new tech and being produced as we speak. But that is Rockets and bombs.

But Forbes warned about these guns years ago. Why because they knew this law will be passed, but it was but not by congress but by Obama he signed by executive order in early 2016 this very thing Forbes warned us about.


It should be noted, however, that the debate over smart guns could have major impact nationwide. The State of New Jersey has already legislated that once smartgun technology is available, conventional firearms may not be sold to civilians in the State. One U.S. Senator has considering introducing a bill in Washington that would apply an even stricter law throughout the nation – requiring not only that all weapons imported, manufactured, or sold in the United States be “smart,” but that all conventional arms in civilian hands be retrofitted with “smart” technology. While the likelihood that such a bill would become law anytime soon is next to zero, clearly smartguns will be on lawmakers minds.

Smartguns are supposed to make everyone safer. Technological shortcomings in the current first generation of products, however, make the story more complex. While not all of the issues below necessarily apply to every smartgun model, together they form reason for concern:

1. Electronic devices require a power source, and smart guns are no exception. Without electricity they cannot be fired. Someone intent on using a firearm for home defense could find herself in serious danger if she drew a weapon on an armed intruder only to find that its batteries are drained. In general, it is not ideal to add a requirement for power to devices utilized in cases of emergency that did not need electricity previously. How many fire codes allow fire extinguishers that require a battery to operate? Before smartguns can be deemed reliable, therefore, they must incorporate countermeasures to address this issue. Simply warning users of low batteries may be insufficient, as many gun owners who do not carry their weapons with them keep their guns locked up, do not check them regularly, and might not see such warnings until it is too late.

2. Computers malfunction, and authentication technology is not perfect. Lawfully armed citizens protecting themselves and/or their families could be killed if their weapons malfunction during a home invasion or attempted rape. While some have argued that conventional semi-automatic handguns also periodically jam, smartguns add a whole new dimension of failure possibilities. Furthermore, technical problems typically take far longer to correct than firearm failures: trained users can often unjam a semi-automatic in a matter of seconds, but even experts cannot normally hard-reboot a malfunctioning piece of electronics that fast. One shudders to consider the possible tragedy if a policeman had to reboot his handgun, or had problems authenticating, during an altercation with an active shooter.



posted on Jan, 15 2018 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

You have never learned how to think critically have you? The NRA is a biased source. Learn to cite. Address what Terry has talked about. The GPS tech is of no use.




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