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Chinese Space Station Set To "Crash Land" Within Next 6 Months

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posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

Crash "land" would seem to be a bit of a misnomer.

Those were the words used in the title of the article wbich is wby I used quotation marks. Kind of like crash parking.




posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 05:49 PM
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On WHO?



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 05:58 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MissSmartypants




Remember...sometime within the next 6 months includes now. So look up.

As the time approaches it will become possible to refine the time and location. So, instead of looking up, look here:
www.aerospace.org...

I wanna see one!


I see no issues with this...earth surface is 71% water...it's like when I hit a golf ball through a tree I tell myself that the tree is 90% air...I mean what could go wrong?



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: violet

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MissSmartypants

Well, you can look up there. And see it, actually. It gets reasonably bright, but not like the ISS.

Go here and set your location:
www.heavens-above.com...

Thanks.
I recall now having an app that alerted me of spacecraft or debris passing over but it kept going off all day long, drove me nuts! So I deleted it. I don't recall what it was. Anyways it seems space debris is all too common though, correct?

I think it will mostly burn up or as usual land in the ocean. Could one cause a tsunami?
Probably no tsunamis...just a lot of fish going "Whoa...what the heck was that?".



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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originally posted by: Silcone Synapse
a reply to: MissSmartypants
I am no expert MSP,but I think most of the space station would break into smaller bits and burn up during atmospheric re entry.
I think other satellites and space stuff has done this in the past.
It may make a nice light show for a lucky few,but I wouldn't worry too much in those smarty pants of yours.


Joke's on you...I'm not wearing any pants.



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: Indrasweb

The chance of that would be extremely low, kinda like pinning the tail on a donkey, in a dark room, whilst wearing sunglasses and spinning around. All done after 10 shots of tequila.

I'm not that good at math, though I can get a sense of the scale... Considering how many squared miles of land exist, how much of that has human occupants then comparing it to how much debris will fall?

Chances are it won't fall near anyone never mind buildings.

So if such a scenario happened, it would probably end in war.

Or the greatest conspiracy so far.
Even though the odds are about a trillion to one against being hit by falling space debris it has happened.
In 1997 Ms. Lottie Williams of Tulsa Oklahoma was taking her usual early morning walk through the park when she was struck on the shoulder by a small piece of a Delta II rocket that had been used to put a satellite in orbit 9 months earlier. Fortunately the piece was so small, thin and lightweight that she wasn't injured at all. The impact was akin to a leaf falling from a tree and hitting her. So improbable doesn't mean impossible and she was even a moving target.
And as I stated eatlier in 1954 a woman was struck on her side by a small meteorite that crashed through her ceiling. Again miraculously she was only bruised.
So if you're a woman you might want to buy yourself a sturdy hardhat and if you're a man you apparently have nothing to worry about. Outer space only hates women.



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 08:35 PM
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I hate to be pedantic (okay, that's not true...) but Tiangong 1 orbits at an inclination of about 42.75 degrees relative to the equator. That means that anything with a latitude greater than 42.75 degrees north or south of the equator should be safe from debris.

For perspective, if you are in North America, Chicago is just about at 42 degrees north. If you're north of Chicago, you're in the clear. As a Wisconsinite, this sadly means that there is pretty much zero chance of it taking out Milwaukee....

Anything between 42.75 degrees north and 42.75 degrees south, on the other hand, has a chance of being in the, *ahem*, "landing" zone.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: PhloydPhan
I hate to be pedantic (okay, that's not true...) but Tiangong 1 orbits at an inclination of about 42.75 degrees relative to the equator. That means that anything with a latitude greater than 42.75 degrees north or south of the equator should be safe from debris.

For perspective, if you are in North America, Chicago is just about at 42 degrees north. If you're north of Chicago, you're in the clear. As a Wisconsinite, this sadly means that there is pretty much zero chance of it taking out Milwaukee....

Anything between 42.75 degrees north and 42.75 degrees south, on the other hand, has a chance of being in the, *ahem*, "landing" zone.
Uh oh (see my location).
And I think you spelled Wisconsinite wrong. Isn't it Wisconsonite? Or is that Mandela Effect thing acting up again?
edit on 10/18/2017 by MissSmartypants because: edit



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 07:04 PM
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a reply to: MissSmartypants

The state's name is spelled Wisconsin (always has been, at least the 30+ years I've been here), so I believe Wisconsinite is correct.

As for your location, of all the places Tiangong 1 COULD come down, a city that is home to as many naval vessels as Norfolk should be one of the safest. I would think at least one Arleigh Burke with BMD capability would be in the area whenever the Chinese station decides to fall out of the sky.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: PhloydPhan
a reply to: MissSmartypants

The state's name is spelled Wisconsin (always has been, at least the 30+ years I've been here), so I believe Wisconsinite is correct.

As for your location, of all the places Tiangong 1 COULD come down, a city that is home to as many naval vessels as Norfolk should be one of the safest. I would think at least one Arleigh Burke with BMD capability would be in the area whenever the Chinese station decides to fall out of the sky.
I've lived here all of my life and my father was navy and I never get tired of seeing our magnificent military aircraft flying overhead. I'm certainly not for war but our milittary technology is awesome.
I realized it was Wisconsin as soon as I hit reply but I tbought my Mandela comment was clever so I left it.
edit on 10/19/2017 by MissSmartypants because: edit



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