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3 years with Linux OS & no freezes or lockups or other problems!!

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posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: Mikeapollo
Use a smartphone? A set top box? iPhone or other tablet... You're using the linux kernel

I only noticed this now.

iPhone's operating system is not based on a Linux kernel, it's based on an Unix kernel, like Linux is.

Edited to add that when I say that Linux is based on the Unix kernel I am thinking about the way it works, not the code.
edit on 15/10/2017 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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Linux is the only way to go. I have been using it off and on for at least 15 years. That is all I use now. Antergos and Manjaro (arch spinoffs) a reply to: DigginFoTroof



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Linux is a dying art. Although , I have nothing against it .


I think you'll find Steam OS (which is a container for games distributed via Steam) is actually a modded Debian kernel.

As for Linux being a dying art... Seems odd that Windows is now incorporating bash extentions for compatibility,

Contrary to your belief, Linux now runs on more devices than any other OS... Not that I have anything against any other OS... however Linux skills are very much in demand and that need is increasing year on year...



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: Mikeapollo
Use a smartphone? A set top box? iPhone or other tablet... You're using the linux kernel

I only noticed this now.

iPhone's operating system is not based on a Linux kernel, it's based on an Unix kernel, like Linux is.

Edited to add that when I say that Linux is based on the Unix kernel I am thinking about the way it works, not the code.


To be absolutely technical, it's actually a BSD kernel which differs slightly from AT&Ts original Unix kernel however fundamentally the core of the Free BSD kernel modified for use in MacOS and iOS still utilises an awful lot of the Linux stack as the trap calls are identical as are many of the operating daemons.

So, to be pedantic - it's safe to say almost every device except windows PC's and Windows Phone operate a flavour of Unix... and now even Microsoft is realising that Unix/BSD/Linux does an awful lot of things more efficiently than the NT kernel - hence their integration of elements of it.


Either way, the current situation is a win win for users and developers as it is getting easier every day to port code from one platform to another and for it to be seemless. The move to Wayland will make this even simpler.

So whether you love Windows, Linux or any other OS - the ongoing development of the Linux kernel benefits everyone and impacts on practically every other OS.

Edited to add : Apple directly develop modules for the Linux kernel, as do Microsoft. Apple specialising in I/O stacks and MS had a lot of input into Wayland. Both released their work under the GP.L and both incorporated those linux elements into their own proprietry systems. Again, every year more and more large corporations develop for *nix in either open source or closed source applications so again, it's anything but a dying art...
edit on 15-10-2017 by Mikeapollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 06:33 PM
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originally posted by: Mikeapollo
To be absolutely technical, it's actually a BSD kernel which differs slightly from AT&Ts original Unix kernel however fundamentally the core of the Free BSD kernel modified for use in MacOS and iOS still utilises an awful lot of the Linux stack as the trap calls are identical as are many of the operating daemons.

Identical doesn't mean they use the same code, right?


So, to be pedantic - it's safe to say almost every device except windows PC's and Windows Phone operate a flavour of Unix... and now even Microsoft is realising that Unix/BSD/Linux does an awful lot of things more efficiently than the NT kernel - hence their integration of elements of it.

Unix yes, Linux no, that's what I was saying.


Edited to add : Apple directly develop modules for the Linux kernel, as do Microsoft. Apple specialising in I/O stacks and MS had a lot of input into Wayland. Both released their work under the GP.L and both incorporated those linux elements into their own proprietry systems. Again, every year more and more large corporations develop for *nix in either open source or closed source applications so again, it's anything but a dying art...

Microsoft has been also porting .Net to Linux, so applications made with .Net can be used on Windows or Linux. At the time there's only a subset of .Net libraries available, but they are committed to it. Microsoft is also porting their database engine, SQL Server, to Linux, something that wasn't possible because some parts are based on .Net code, but is possible now.

So, in a relatively near future, we will be able to take any .Net Windows program and run in Linux, and that includes SQL Server and sites made with .Net.

Linux is hardly a lost art. Judging by Microsoft's actions it looks like Microsoft is betting that Linux is here to stay.



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: Mikeapollo
So, to be pedantic - it's safe to say almost every device except windows PC's and Windows Phone operate a flavour of Unix... and now even Microsoft is realising that Unix/BSD/Linux does an awful lot of things more efficiently than the NT kernel - hence their integration of elements of it.

One big problem with the NT kernel was the decision to include the graphics part inside the kernel, that has been the biggest responsible for blue screens in Windows since Windows 2000.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 04:13 AM
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originally posted by: Mikeapollo
A few ways can be found at help.ubuntu.com... (Although it's a Ubuntu page, this process is practically identical on every distro).


It didn't work.

They even say this on that page:

This setting takes effect after Login and has no effect at the Login screen or consoles.


Not what I need.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Which distro and desktop are you currently using?



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Mikeapollo

Ubuntu 11.04 with Gnome.



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Try configuring LightDM :

sudo mkdir /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d

[the next bit is ALL one line]

sudo sh -c 'printf "[Seat:*]ngreeter-setup-script=numlockx onn" >/etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-numlock.conf

then reboot the system.

It might also be worth checking your system BIOS for a "numlock on boot" status (usually in "advanced features") as GDM and LightDM will honour the bios setting.
edit on 16-10-2017 by Mikeapollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: Mikeapollo

Thanks, I'll try that tomorrow.



posted on Oct, 17 2017 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: Mikeapollo

It didn't work, but I have a few questions about that command, after looking about it on the Internet:
1 - Do I need to install "numlockx"?
2 - Is there an extra "n" or is it really "onn"?
3 - Why the apostrophe before "printf"?

PS: the BIOS has the numlock on, when I boot the computer it turns the light on, then when Ubuntu loads it turns the light off.

PPS: sorry everybody for the off topic, but, on topic, I suppose it shows why some people don't think Linux is ready for all people to use on their computers.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 01:34 AM
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I'm glad that everyone responded to this and am shocked at what I see! I can safely say that the ATS members are a breed apart from the rest of humanity and it shows in the people who use or know how to use Linux in this forum.

As for the comments about Microsoft entering the Lionux development area, I am a little concerned about this. I think it is strategy for them and they may try to use the GPL against the community somehow. I forget exactly how it works, but I read that they could press something like "patent" rights or rights to code that could cripple the community. IDK enough about how it works and when I heard it explained by some people who had been contributors for 20+ years, they were all very concerned and wanted MS to GTFO of the open source community as they figured it was to subvert it in nefarious ways. Their explination made sense - I think it was by some admins & mods on Stack exchange or possibley LQ.org.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
As for the comments about Microsoft entering the Lionux development area, I am a little concerned about this. I think it is strategy for them and they may try to use the GPL against the community somehow. I forget exactly how it works, but I read that they could press something like "patent" rights or rights to code that could cripple the community. IDK enough about how it works and when I heard it explained by some people who had been contributors for 20+ years, they were all very concerned and wanted MS to GTFO of the open source community as they figured it was to subvert it in nefarious ways. Their explination made sense - I think it was by some admins & mods on Stack exchange or possibley LQ.org.

Microsoft's position regarding Linux has changed in the same way Linux has changed.

At first they saw it as a menace that should be destroyed.

When they saw that it wouldn't go away they changed their tactics and said to their sellers not to attack Linux but to show how with Microsoft people could be more productive. I know about this because the company where I work had a contract with Microsoft (nothing special, any IT company can get one of those) and we received some sales material.

Then, some years ago, Microsoft started thinking about "software as a service", and they changed once more their targets. They started their Azure platform and the selling of Office as renewable service, and last year Windows was only the third biggest source of money for Microsoft, with Office the number one. Windows represented only 25% of what Microsoft got from their top three selling products, Office, Cloud Services and Windows.

At the same time Microsoft started seeing developers as a way of making their products more popular, so they made a free version of Visual Studio, their developer suite. As they also have free versions of SQL Server that are perfectly usable, anyone with Windows can start programming. Microsoft would prefer them to use .Net, but Visual Studio is not limited to that.

They also started taking Open Source software more seriously, and, at first, they helped develop the Mono Project, that wanted to port .Net to Linux. This year they finally bought Xamarin and made even more parts of .Net freely available.

So, those fears of patent juggling are more and more a thing of the past, as Microsoft appears committed to use Open Source software as a means of making people use their cloud services.

PS: porting Office to Linux would be great, as there isn't any free office suite that I like.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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originally posted by: Mikeapollo


originally posted by: Gothmog
Linux is a dying art. Although , I have nothing against it .


I think you'll find Steam OS (which is a container for games distributed via Steam) is actually a modded Debian kernel.

As for Linux being a dying art... Seems odd that Windows is now incorporating bash extentions for compatibility,

Contrary to your belief, Linux now runs on more devices than any other OS... Not that I have anything against any other OS... however Linux skills are very much in demand and that need is increasing year on year...


You said it. Devices.

Not Operating Systems, where you control your experience, but a device that you just use.

My watch has an OS. It's cogs and a winder. I turn the winder, and the cogs tick away. It's as pluyg'n'play as you can get. But I can't make it use flash... *yes old school watch, though it does require a new fangled battery, but grandfathers watch had a mechanism that let me power it by shaking it*

Devices. Android does well.
Desktops. Linux serves a niche.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: Mikeapollo

Ubuntu 11.04 with Gnome.


Gnome is the equivalent of Windows in terms of sluggishness.

XC4FE is the way.

But as I've mentioned, I am using (was) Peppermint OS, and the difference between Ubuntu with Gnome, and this, is like washing the engine in your car with sulfuric acid and leaving the parts that just work, clean.

having said that, I'm still posting from windows. if I want to run bash I'll install the bash for windows that comes with windows 10. I'l already run all the powershell Remove-AppxPackage commands to get rid of the extraneous rubbish.

Funny how windows does take on a linux bent for some things... still, remove app-name is still more intuitive that sudo apt-get remove app-name..

10 Print "how to delete something according to Linus Torvalds and his forks."
20 Print "install it but remove it"
30 Print "broken packages wahh fix me fix me"
40 Print "you will never win..."
50 Print "learn 500 pages but never get there thanks to 40."
60 Print "Never win the internet."
70 Print "sudo apt-get install windows again"
80 Print "Sad relief....."
90 Print "Try a different variant of Linux."
100 Goto 60

Run
* Syntax error in C++ line 958 error "undefined statement in module system.code.meaningless.py fatal death you will never learn.c 100348 die you human.c_ hail ye. terminating with code 0"
fault: "dependencies not met. Install ubuntu.desktop and suck a banana"

times 500.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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Spoke too soon! Talk about odd coincindences (or is it my computer is cojntrolled externally?). Well, I hadn't rebooted for about 6 weeks, and It was acting up b/c I have 400+ web pages open at a time, close them all, repeat, & and do this for weeks months (this usually uses about 16GB of RAM) but I always kill all the browser processes, stop network services, restart network services and open browsers again and it is good as new - all without a reboot. Well I had about 8 video's I was editing and the software is buggy so it caused some problems (blackouts on parts of screen). I rebooted.

I usually get the BIOS, then the Ubuntu splash screen, then the login page. This time, I got BIOS then GRUB with odd options and a new ubuntu version 17.04 (which I never installed or did a dist-upgrade), so I have no idea why it was there. any option I chose except for just "Ubuntu" gave me black screens for ~7 mins before rebooting itself or myself rebooting. The "ubuntu option" gave me 4 options for booting (not sure if these are the exact kernel releases, except for the last 3 digits 3.23 and 3.46 which struck me as odd.
-Kernel 3.03.23
-Kernel 3.03.23 (recovery)
-Kernel 3.03.46
-Kernel 3.03.46 (recovery)

I found this really odd and I selected the 3.03.23 recovery. There were 6 options and I didn't want to pick any of them, because it allows for the hard drive to be written to and I have no idea why this started. I then remembered that I had my Samsung Galaxy Tab S plugged into a USB3 port and I know this can cause boot problems (at least in my machine). So I unplugged it, rebooted and all was fine! I had tried booting over 10 times with the tablet plugged in and it just wouldn't work (and the options just seemed VERY ODD) - almost like the system was booting from the tablet and displaying some generic (hacked??) GRUB screen which would have given FULL access to the computer after that point - NOT A GOOD THING!

AS a side note, I got the tablet from Ebay for a good deal b/c it had some screen burn in (not noticable really) but for $100 vs almost $400 that seemed pretty good.

I need to look into how a cell phone or tablet can gain access to a desktop or laptop is plugged in while booting - especially if the system is set up to boot from USB!




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