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Mysterious loss of water from Mississippi River at New Madrid fault area

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posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Phage
I guess you didn't find that humorous.




posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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In 47 years I have experienced 2 seismic tremors living in southern indiana.

The new madrid fault is the real deal.

HOWEVER.

Low water levels ain't got nothing to do with it.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Eshel
I'm just across the river near Cape.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I wonder why I'm stuck on "water" the past couple of days?

*shrugs*

There is the opening for that false flag!


The hyrograph doesn't look out of whack. Is the vid all doom porn then?

Dang it. Maybe I'll go hang out in dreams and predictions for some good old fashioned doom porn!




posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage

That's the upper Mississippi region. The lower region is where this is reported. When I checked that I only saw 2 gauges below waterline level. Is there a good place to get a depth reading for that area...maybe one that tracks levels over time so we can see what it has been year by year at this time of year? That would be most helpful. Still weird to me how,the water is higher up river than down river considering it has to flow down...the only explanation is something blocking the flow.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: RickyD




Still weird to me how,the water is higher up river than down river considering it has to flow down...the only explanation is something blocking the flow.

Water levels in rivers do not change at the same time at all points in the river.
Low water moves downstream, and high water moves downstream.
 

Pick a station for current data. Scroll down for record data.
water.weather.gov...


edit on 10/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Fair enough...again I'm far from an expert. I just felt like this would be a more interesting discussion than the usual politics so I posted it. Still wouldn't mind hearing from some of our seismo nerds here and find out if they have seen anything unusual though. Appreciate everyone's contributions so far though.

Thanks for the link...when I get home and have a computer I'll take a look, my phone just doesnt run that sites interactive maps very well.
edit on 13-10-2017 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: RickyD




I just felt like this would be a more interesting discussion than the usual politics so I posted it.


With that, you are 100% correct.
At least there's actual data to work with.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: RickyD


I just felt like this would be a more interesting discussion than the usual politics so I posted it.


It's something we had already discussed at some length in TA's live stream. Some of the viewers who haunt some of the other (much less reputable) channels where it was being made a big deal of brought it to our attention and so we spent a little time on it.

They were also trying to tie this in with an event that occurs in Cabo San Lucas every few years when the tide goes down far enough for there to be dry sand below the arch and to the meteotsunami that took place when Irma drew water away from the Bahamas and then again in Florida.


Still wouldn't mind hearing from some of our seismo nerds here


TA hasn't been around here much at all since he put up the stream of his rig, but he usually spends a little time each day in the channel chat when he gets home from work going over recent volcanic and tectonic movements plus other interesting and related bits.

Current feed here:



Join chat and let us know you're from ATS if you poke your head out from the sea of lurkers.
edit on 13-10-2017 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

I saw this same video about the Mississippi being low and wondered since the mighty Missouri has been running high all year here in KC.

Since I couldn't find any real articles in any of the other news sources, I figured that this wasn't anything terribly unusual and went on with things. You can't hide something like that and if it was something that didn't happen, it would hit the news even if only locally.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 03:22 PM
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start moving now, anywhere but Cali and Yellowstone



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 03:36 PM
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the missing water is going into an enormous sinkhole, Ogallah Aquifer I think its' called....

let me search that---OK


its =

Ogallala Aquifer - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org...

The Ogallala Aquifer is a shallow water table ... agricultural irrigation and oil and coal ... that they would normally require to irrigate the fields, ...


this underground fresh water sea is all under the Midwestern States...and the water has been depleted by 100 years of irrigation
edit on th31150792709913382017 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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Did anyone scroll down on the page that Phage
linked in his reply to TEOTWAWKIAIFF on page one???

There are a number of reports of flooding in Tennessee & Arkansas. Rivers running backwards, the Mississippi backing up into rivers, water nearly overflowing levees, flooding making evacuations difficult.

Looked it over three times to see if I'm reading it wrong. And to make sure the page was for today.
The graph is showing low levels. But don't know where that is in comparison to the reports.

They are also referring to a place called 'Sunk Lake'. Which to me says that at one time it must not have been sunk. Maybe during the New Madrid Quake it sunk?

Has there been that much rain locally? It doesn't make sense that part of the Mississippi would have flooding when part has to be dredged because it is so low. Unless there is major uplift or sinking going on. Especially if rivers are running backward. Something must be blocking it somewhere.

Thoughts???
WOQ



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: wasobservingquietly




Looked it over three times to see if I'm reading it wrong. And to make sure the page was for today.

You are reading it wrong.
Those are "flood impacts", what would happen if water levels reached those heights.

Many other stations list the same.

edit on 10/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: RickyD

Interesting, and worth watching, but the rivers are low in other places, too. Those in our area, that end up flowing to the Mississippi eventually, are also low, with sandbars showing. Just not as much rain as needed to make them higher. If they are low, then the Mississippi will be as well.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 06:09 PM
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Yea after doing as much reading up on it as I could while at work it seems pretty clear that drought conditions are causing this. Also learned something new about the gauges on the Mississippi. When they installed them it was the river workers who did it so each one is different...and 0 is not the bottom. They instead made 0 the lowest anyone could remember at the time, so that's how you get negative numbers on them. Fun fact since you guys took the time to stop by. Sorry the doom porn was canceled lol!
edit on 13-10-2017 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 06:13 PM
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By the way the river is drying up you should be getting some wheels for your boat.
a reply to: coop039



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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In our area the Mississippi River is low because of a Flood Mitigation Project. They lowered the river in between locks to build a flood wall and other projects. More water was released downriver at the next lock. They lowered our portion at least a couple feet in one week.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: RickyD
I am just curious as to the cause. If there is good evidence that this is normal low water season or due to drought I am fine accepting that. I would be very interested in an explanation of how the water is significantly lower down river where the water should flow from the higher water areas up river. If the levels are just as low up river then it would make sense, but it doesnt appear to be the case here.



I think the dams actually control the deepness of the water along the Mississippi. I know Lock and Dam 13 and 14 do in the area of the Quad Cities (Moline, Rock Island, Davenport ). I wonder how the level is there. Usually this time of year the water level is rising or at least back to late May level.



posted on Oct, 13 2017 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: musicismagic
Bingo! Dams. The Corps of Engineers has control of the navigable waters and really do a remarkable job of keeping the commerce flowing.

This time of year the lakes behind those dams are holding water for bird migrations. Add to that the fact that the rainfall totals don't always reflect the actual conditions. We might have two inches of rainfall in a very short time. Most of that rainfall will be carried off quickly. But if the same amount of water falls over a several hour period far more will soak into the surface and ultimately to the aquifer. In our area there has been that very mix of rainfall throughout the growing season. Farmers say we've had the perfect amount of rainfall at just the right times for a really fine corn harvest.

I've lived between the Tennessee and the Mississippi for most of my adult life. Those pictures don't show anything unusual.

The pictures in the video seem to be of bottomland. It's not unusual at all to see it dry at this time. In fact, farmers pray that the fall monsoons don't come to flood it until after the bottomland crops are harvested.
I'm pretty sure if the riverbed were being lifted up the navigation systems on all the boats would be transmitting that information.

These droughts have allowed archaeologists to make some pretty neat recoveries. Here's one from 2012.
www.semissourian.com...




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