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Why can't America adopt a NHS type system ??

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posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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The NHS systems are 98.8% funded from general taxation and National Insurance contributions, plus small amounts from patient charges for some services. About 10% of GDP is spent on health and most is spent in the public sector. The money to pay for the NHS comes directly from taxation. The 2008/9 budget roughly equates to a contribution of £1,980 per person in the UK. What is stopping the USA from adopting a similar system. Everybody pays towards their health via a percentage of wage like UK National Insurance, then receives free health care when requested. Its very simple




posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: LondonMan
At a guess, two reasons.
We are used to the level of taxation necessary to fund the NHS, but can you imagine the additional taxation needed to start such a system from scratch?
Also this is labelled in their minds as "socialised medicine". Socialism! Ugh!



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: LondonMan

Money. Someone is going to have to take less money...

And the ones who are going to have to take less money have a HUGE lobby. Profits over people in the US.






.
edit on 12-10-2017 by seasonal because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: LondonMan

Because the Insurance industry in the US is utterly HUGE and they huge stockpiles of cash which they use to lobby Congress, i.e. bribe by way of paying huge campaign contributions and Representatives in Congress are up for re-election every 2 years. Therefor, the people in Congress do whatever the big corporations, among them Health Insurance companies, want.

Simple really, its all about the money and the power.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: LondonMan
The NHS systems are 98.8% funded from general taxation and National Insurance contributions, plus small amounts from patient charges for some services. About 10% of GDP is spent on health and most is spent in the public sector. The money to pay for the NHS comes directly from taxation. The 2008/9 budget roughly equates to a contribution of £1,980 per person in the UK. What is stopping the USA from adopting a similar system. Everybody pays towards their health via a percentage of wage like UK National Insurance, then receives free health care when requested. Its very simple


The USA has a privatized healthcare system. Both the private hospitals and insurance companies (Health Management Organizations) are out to maximize profits and minimize overheads. Insurance companies will avoid paying out for high cost long term conditions or even avoid covering them altogether. Pharmaceutic companies. doctors and hospitals like to charge as much as possible. Then population is getting older and then there are large numbers of poor people who are on minimum wage who don't have any insurance. There is also unlimited demand for services from South America due to
illegal immigration.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

But we would drop:
-the monthly insurance cost
-the copays
-the every growing deductables
-the out of network costs
-the drug cost (should) go down



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:31 PM
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Ask these questions when the richest people in countries with socialised healthcare stop coming to America for better faster treatment.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI
Naaah, there's only one reason, it's called greed. First there are the doctors wanting millionaire type wages. Then (the Americans cannot get this through their skulls) there is the insurance companies. These are government protected parasites taking the lions share of the money that's supposed to pay for their medical needs.
Then the biggest one the American government. Heavy money to set up a system????? If they use 25% of the defence budget they would have a world class system. The only question that the Americans should be asking is "why does it take so much in the defence budget". When America is at war with NO-ONE. No-one is trying to invade America and all that's at stake is their want to be the biggest dick in the playground.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: DISRAELI

But we would drop:
-the monthly insurance cost
-the copays
-the every growing deductables
-the out of network costs
-the drug cost (should) go down


And the insane costs of all those things would be divided out and added into the costs of everything else you spend money on in order to make it up.

Sp your food, your housing, your electricity, your gas, your income taxes at all levels, etc., all of that gets hideously more expensive all at once.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: Excallibacca
Ask these questions when the richest people in countries with socialised healthcare stop coming to America for better faster treatment.


Need some sources for this please.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: LondonMan
Why can't America adopt a NHS type system ??

The short answer is that our federal government was not designed to have such authority over what should be a private industry.

Also, the 10th Amendment, IMO, verifies that it's something that the federal government doesn't have the authority to do.

Oh, and comparing a country with 20% of the population of another on something like this isn't an appropriate comparison, as it's not a direct comparison, and what works for one won't always work for another.

Plus, I don't want to rely on the federal government's ineptitude when it comes to my life.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko





And the insane costs of all those things would be divided out and added into the costs of everything else you spend money on in order to make it up.


Maybe, but when there is a taxpayer funded system in other countries costs are cut in at least half. Maybe it will be different here in the US.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: DISRAELI

But we would drop:
-the monthly insurance cost
-the copays
-the every growing deductables
-the out of network costs
-the drug cost (should) go down
This is what I don't get, the UK government has us paying a percentage of our wages as our National Insurance 'contribution'. That entitles us to full health benefits, what is this deductible/copay nonsense.
edit on 12-10-2017 by LondonMan because: spell error



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

You have yet to convince me that it would work that way here and retain any kind of quality.

Look at public education. Many of the school districts that are taxpayer funded here have enough money per pupil to send those kids to pretty solid private schools and yet they have kids in crumbling facilities not learning anything and eating crap for food. And the administrators are top heavy.

That's where we would be headed with our health care too. If you don't think so examine the VA.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey


Plus, I don't want to rely on the federal government's ineptitude when it comes to my life.


What do you mean? The VA health care system works so amazingly well, I can't imagine why you're not jumping at that program to go cradle-to-grave for everybody!



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: LondonMan
Why can't America adopt a NHS type system ??

The short answer is that our federal government was not designed to have such authority over what should be a private industry.

Also, the 10th Amendment, IMO, verifies that it's something that the federal government doesn't have the authority to do.

Oh, and comparing a country with 20% of the population of another on something like this isn't an appropriate comparison, as it's not a direct comparison, and what works for one won't always work for another.

Plus, I don't want to rely on the federal government's ineptitude when it comes to my life.
you would rather just use some private doctor who will fleece you to death. gee whizz



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: LondonMan

originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: DISRAELI

But we would drop:
-the monthly insurance cost
-the copays
-the every growing deductables
-the out of network costs
-the drug cost (should) go down
This is what I don't get, the UK government has us paying a percentage of our wages as our National Insurance 'contribution'. That entitles us to full health benefits, what is this deductible/copay nonsense.


When you buy an insurance policy, it usually comes with what is called a deductible that you have to pay out of pocket for some services. Generally, this amount renews itself at the start of every year. If you meet the deductible, then your insurance covers 100% of costs for you.

A copay is an amount you pay on some items and services. Generally, it is a percentage split. In most insurances or at least good ones, the copay counts toward deductible. The split will vary depending on the service you are using. A pharmacy copay might be $5 for drugs below a certain cost threshold and then bump up to $15 for drugs that go above that with insurance covering the rest. When our kid was in occupational therapy, the insurance was a 10%/90% split with them picking up 90% of the costs.

That's why you shop around and want someone who can really explain what you are buying to determine if it will meet your needs or not.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Could it be that the cherry picked (horrible and disgraceful) stories are not the norm for the VA?

And there are very very good public schools and very very bad. It called parent involvement, something that no amount of $$$ can fix. And I totally agree it should not cost 12,000$$ to educate a K-12 student.

There are many many systems around the world that chug along just fine that are ranked better in both cost and quality than the US's.
Our system is going to collapse, and this happens when Joe and Jane 6pack look at their monthly mortgage and health insurance bills and decide they need a place to live more than shotty health care coverage.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: LondonMan

Show me that they can provide basic medical care to our Vets via the VA, and I may be willing to give them a try. But im not interested in being left to die in a stairwell.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: LondonMan

Simple answer:

They don't want it.



Leaves the rest of us scratching our heads, but that's just the way it is.

*shrug*




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