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Missing Half of Normal Matter in the Universe Has Been Detected

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posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 02:40 PM
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Most dark matter is the E8-singlet state of E8xE8' heterotic superstrings. It is invisible and confined to a parallel space-time sheet separated from the space-time sheet containing ordinary (visible) matter (E8'-singlet states) by a narrow gap extending along the 10th dimension of space predicted by M-theory. Only gravity acts across this gap. It is the glue that holds together a rotating galaxy.




posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: micpsi
Most dark matter is the E8-singlet state of E8xE8' heterotic superstrings. It is invisible and confined to a parallel space-time sheet separated from the space-time sheet containing ordinary (visible) matter (E8'-singlet states) by a narrow gap extending along the 10th dimension of space predicted by M-theory. Only gravity acts across this gap. It is the glue that holds together a rotating galaxy.


Superstrings? Lol

Dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble

M-Theory? Lol

Dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble, dribble

Nothing is certain in life but death, tax, and nutters....



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 07:13 PM
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UPDATE!


Ordinary matter, or "baryons," make up all physical objects in existence, from stars to the cores of black holes. But until now, astrophysicists had only been able to locate about two-thirds of the matter that theorists predict was created by the Big Bang.

In the new research, an international team pinned down the missing third, finding it in the space between galaxies. That lost matter exists as filaments of oxygen gas at temperatures of around 1 million degrees Celsius, said CU Boulder's Michael Shull, a co-author of the study.

The finding is a major step for astrophysics. "This is one of the key pillars of testing the Big Bang theory: figuring out the baryon census of hydrogen and helium and everything else in the periodic table," said Shull of the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences (APS).

The new study, which will appear June 20 in Nature[...]


The team found the signatures of a type of highly-ionized oxygen gas lying between the quasar and our solar system—and at a high enough density to, when extrapolated to the entire universe, account for the last 30 percent of ordinary matter.

"We found the missing baryons," Shull said.

phys.org, June 20, 2018 - Researchers find last of universe's missing ordinary matter.

They knew it had to be somewhere. They pointed some satellites to area between galaxies and found ionized oxygen that galaxies had blown out into space.

It still needs to be verified but they know where to look and what to look for. Combined with OP they have a nice little box of matter in universe.

Still no word on dark matter or dark energy.



posted on Jun, 21 2018 @ 05:33 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Here's some of the latest findings on Dark Matter.

Although not the results they wanted. There's a lot of work being done to find it.

Very interesting.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 05:03 AM
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This hit my email box today.

I think you might like it.

Physicists claim to have found the last missing protons and neutrons.

www.livescience.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 05:05 AM
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a reply to: blackcrowe

Hell, I can't even keep track of my last dollar.

That's impressive.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Thanks Pharge.

That was funny.



They might claim to have found it.

They're now going to have to prove it.

I already posted on here Eros433 last update on xenon dark matter. Non found yet.

Guess we'll find out sooner or later.



posted on Jun, 26 2018 @ 11:50 AM
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As usual the Dark Matter and Energy debate rages on. Yet again the gloomy prediction that by the time we can reach Interstellar Space, it won't be there for us to reach. Dark Matter is theorised due to the excessive rotation speed of Galaxy filaments, Red-Shift of distant objects and Lensing events due to 'invisible' ie Non-Radiating mass. I doesn't take a great step to imagine that the ratio of 'Stellar Objects vs Black Body Objects' needs to be revised. But what truly bothers me is the fact that when Light emerges from a Gravitational Well its energy or wavelength is lessened. So, for instance light emitted from a distant Galaxy will be red shifted simply because of the mass of the emitting object. Factor in that light from distant objects will pass by and through many vast concentrations of matter and we begin to see that all distant objects are red-shifted. Its rather silly, isn't true science and is reminiscent of a 15th century Popes view that the Earth is the centre of the Universe.



posted on Jun, 26 2018 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
How in the vastness of space do you measure something you can't detect?

You may not be able to detect it directly, but maybe there's a way to detect it because of the effect it has on other stuff you can measure. Maybe matter exists on a spectrum like light, so you get super matter, plasma, regular matter, dark matter, and then negative matter.



posted on Jun, 26 2018 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Thanks for the update, this is really interesting stuff.

I've seen the filaments simulations and they make sense. It makes sense that as space expands and gravity pulls things inward that at one point the filaments would form. I would imagine we are lucky to be living at this stage in the universe as in another 20 or 30 billion years there should be no more filaments, correct? Space will have stretched too far and the clumps of matter will have absorbed the remaining filaments?

What sticks out for me here and I'm hoping someone more educated can explain it to me -- why would this oxygen plasma, I'm guessing it's plasma at that temp, be at 1 million degrees?

If it is dense enough to give off such levels of energy, why hasn't it coalesced into stars? Do you think it will? Are these filaments still churning out stars? They can't be as then those stars would form galaxies inside of filaments, and we're not seeing that, right?

I'm a neophyte but I try to understand it... if anyone could explain what I'm wondering about it wold help a lot. Thanks.



posted on Sep, 10 2018 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Kharron


The gasses (called the "Warm-Hot Intergalactic Matter" or WHIM), is hot enough to knock electrons off of hydrogen so it is hard to look for light interacting with the hydrogen so they can "see" it directly. The OP was about one group but now there are a couple different measurement using different techniques that give the same answer. The plasma is also strung out between galaxies with no gravity to help kick off fusion ignition.

Nice, new and updated, write up at quantamagazine.org, Sept. 10, 2018 - The Last of the Universe’s Ordinary Matter Has Been Found.

It is not super acronym heavy and gives a nice review of the research. Enjoy!




posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 01:55 PM
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For those that pondered about black holes and dark matter (if BH is hiding DM or DE) there is some bad news....


Based on a statistical analysis of 740 of the brightest supernovas discovered as of 2014, and the fact that none of them appear to be magnified or brightened by hidden black hole "gravitational lenses," the researchers concluded that primordial black holes can make up no more than about 40 percent of the dark matter in the universe.

...

Their conclusions are based on the fact that an unseen population of primordial black holes, or any massive compact object, would gravitationally bend and magnify light from distant objects on its way to Earth. Therefore, gravitational lensing should affect the light from distant Type Ia supernovas. These are the exploding stars that scientists have used as standard brightness sources to measure cosmic distances and document the expansion of the universe.

...

"You cannot see this effect on one supernova, but when you put them all together and do a full Bayesian analysis you start putting very strong constraints on the dark matter, because each supernova counts and you have so many of them," Zumalacárregui said. The more supernovas included in the analysis, and the farther away they are, the tighter the constraints. Data on 1,048 bright supernovas from the Pantheon catalog provided an even lower upper limit—23 percent—than the newly published analysis.

phys.org, Oct. 2, 2018 - Black holes ruled out as universe's missing dark matter.

The newly published analysis puts an upper limit but another analysis has a lower one and contains that d@mn number again, 23. So that one is probably correct.

It could be that Type 1A supernovae are not as consistent as believed but they have been studied now for a while so that is not probably a path that needs retreading. It could also mean that Bayesian statistics is off but it keeps on being found all over the place besides astronomy or economics; so much so they have a new term called, "universality", which applies to bus schedules, the zeroes of the Riemann zeta function, and Raman spectroscopy of quasicrystals!

That kind of means that black holes are not hiding dark matter. Which also means we do not really know what it is.



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Well. Um. Yeah.

We don't know what it is.

But even if it turned out that a lot of it was in black holes, we still wouldn't know what it is.

Doesn't matter (get it?) where it isn't. We still don't know what it is.


edit on 10/3/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 03:25 AM
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i cant deal with this rubbish really. especially that bing bang thing. it is an awful interpretation. this is how universe began.




posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: Damla
This isn't about the big bang. It's about some inconsistent observations.

But, prove it. Prove that's how the Universe began. Earth existed before the Universe? How does that work?

edit on 10/3/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 03:34 AM
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a reply to: Phage

didnt you watch the video? it is clearly said the sages have the proof. are you a sage? if you are it is your thing to show proof if you arent first learn to listen.
edit on 3-10-2018 by Damla because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-10-2018 by Damla because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 03:35 AM
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a reply to: Damla

No. But I cook with it on occasion.

I watched the video you posted. It makes no sense.



edit on 10/3/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 04:06 AM
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a reply to: Phage

You could ask your niece.




posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 04:07 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

Heh.

Which one?

Oh. The one with the doctorate. I get it.

edit on 10/3/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: Phage







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