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Most cookbooks are useless

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posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

I'm French trained but right now I'm doing mainly charcuterie. I love cooking southern food though. My girlfriend is from the Deep South and In the past I have lived in the south for many years and love that approach to food and cooking. But every country has its amazing cuisines that I salavate for. I love smoking. I love sauces. I love fermentation and brines. I love making hand pies. And most of all I love my couch and chihuahua! I worked another 12 hour shift today. Lame!!!
edit on 10-10-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Brain dead




posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

That's exactly what I do. I'll Google things like best juicy pork chops or easy ways to tenderize a cheap cut of beef. Or even how to fillet a fish. I watched videos for that one.
Now I can even make my own pasta though it's messy and time consuming. The results if I'm feeling ambitious is worth it.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Do you use a double boiler when doing your slow cook scramble eggs? I've made scramble eggs that take up to an hour to cook.
edit on 10-10-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: I love Ithaca milk



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Great idea for a thread.

I'd have to agree with you on the Joy of Cooking.....interesting material, but I cannot say I ever fell in love with a recipe.

I used to really enjoy Nathalie Dupree's Southern Cooking show several years back. Everything looked so interesting and good.
I remember trying her Chess Pie and loving it.

Now I mostly look online for recipes and techniques.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I really liked molto Mario. That has always been one of my favorite cooking shows. When I lived in the Caribbean and was a lazy bastard for a year, every morning I would switch on cooking channel and watch that show. Good stuff.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
We spatchcocked it and laid it out on a rack on a cookie sheet in the oven, basted it with some butter and applied a paste/rub with butter and seasonings under the skin we stole from an Ina Garten recipe. In a couple hours it was done with perfectly crisp skin and not dry at all.



Funny you should mention that method.
I learned about that on some cooking show.....maybe Emeril....but never knew what it was called.
IMHO, it is the best way to cook poultry!!!!!
No more overdone white meat and underdone dark meat. And you can do so much with seasonings. We've done a thing with chopped garlic, onion and green and black olives under the skin...AWESOME!!!!!!



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

I usually do confit with the legs and wings of two ducks, don't know how much weight that may be. Certainly not 37 lbs.

I have a decent oven but it usually runs high.

I cure the meat for 2 days but I've actually used confit without curing as well. I don't know what you mean by overhauling it. I do rinse it but just briefly. I cook in duck fat about every 3rd time as I don't have ready access to duck fat and use the stored fat from the last three times I've made it. I usually just use lard. 2.5 hours at 250 and it's done. I really don't check it, it's just done. That's probably stupid, but it's the truth.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Yes!!!
I forgot about him.....great show.
He always made me want to start cooking.

I love this thread.....I've become such a slug in the kitchen.
Maybe this will get me going again.

It's become a challenge.
I need to avoid gluten. My husband should avoid corn and yeast.
MAkes one lazy.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:38 PM
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a reply to: TobyFlenderson

2-3 days for curing is a good amount of time. Overhauling is flipping the duck pieces over halfway through the cure process. If you use lard do you at least use clean lard or leaf lard? Just done? That's the perfect answer. When you can pierce the meat and it slides cleanly through it's done.

Did you post your cure recipe, I don't remember. Post it and I will post mine. I have a spreadsheet scaler and will scale it down for you but I'm fading fast tonight. I will do it for you though. How many legs and wings do you usually do? What type of ducks are you using to confit?
edit on 10-10-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Overhaul




posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 06:33 AM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
I really liked molto Mario. That has always been one of my favorite cooking shows.


I miss that show. Ever catch the one with a young Jake & Maggie Gyllenhaal? Too funny.





edit on 11-10-2017 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman




Sillyolme knows his/her? Stuff for making a great roux. But if you're making chicken and dumplings you could also just do a quick butter/flour roux as a thickener. A good ol' Cajun roux like sillyolme said is 50/50 oil/flour.


Thats funny and also spot on I guess. I have a Justin Wilson cookbook. An Ol' Cajun himself. In the book he says to make a roux just like you said, 50/50. But elsewhere he describes the sound of the veggies sizzling when they hit the roux and I have seen a video with veggies so I guess I got confused.

So thank you guys/gals very much. Wish I was a great chef but am content just being a great tin knocker lol



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: tinner07

The veg I admit I omitted. The veg is used to quickly cool the roux as you take it off the heat so it won't burn. It adds a nice personality to one's Roux as well. It's the same idea as adding veg to a roast to distribute the heat or when one roasts bones so the bones don't take on too much color and burn.

I think what has confused you is the term roux. A roux is just a thickener. The term it self does not just apply to a Cajun roux. One can make a roux from flour and butter when they make bechamel to make mac and cheese.
edit on 11-10-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: I'm currently working roux problems



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Dude, we've totally discussed this silly ass episode before. Maggie, her husband and Jake used to come into my work all the time when I worked in park slope. I guess their parents live there and they would swing by for fancy sandwiches and cheese.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 06:55 AM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
Dude, we've totally discussed this silly ass episode before. Maggie, her husband and Jake used to come into my work all the time when I worked in park slope. I guess their parents live there and they would swing by for fancy sandwiches and cheese.


Who are we talking about?



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 07:34 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Snoopdog



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman


I was at his dispensary in Oregon.

Purely for business purposes mind you.



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 09:51 PM
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Here is a great video on butchering my favorite beast. The pig. If you are interested at all in butchering you should check this out.

Hog butchering



posted on Oct, 15 2017 @ 10:33 PM
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Most home cooks don't tie up their meats. Tying up your meat helps it to keep its shape and it helps it to cook evenly. It also
allows you to stuff your meat. It's a simple knot. Here is a great video of the classic butchers knot.

Here's a 3 things you should shoot for.

Make sure you line up your knots so they look uniform.

Lock your knots.

Make your knots tight. Real tight.

This Brit does a great demonstration.

A proper butchers knot


edit on 15-10-2017 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Meats!



posted on Oct, 20 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Paul Prudhomme and Meathead rock. I wholly endorse those choices!

Some of my favorites are local and unknown, but here they are:

Miss Cleo's Cayman Kitchen by Cleopatra Conolly
The Complete Book of Soups and Stewsby Barnard Clayton, Jr.
Craig Claiborne's Southern Cooking
Tropic Magic by Joyce LaFray Young
A Wok For All Seasons by Martin Yan
The Sheraton World Cookbook

And, of course, Epicurious High Strangeness by me......... as yet unpublished



posted on Oct, 20 2017 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: argentus
And, of course, Epicurious High Strangeness by me......... as yet unpublished


Now I'm really curious, give us a sample.



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