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Teenager 'thrown out of school' for sitting during Pledge of Allegiance

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posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:33 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: Regnor


Forced patriotism is the best patriotism, don't you think


It's the only authentic kind.


You can't take voluntary patriotism seriously, really.




posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:34 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986

originally posted by: Abysha

originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: Abysha

Of course not, the school should be punished.


So... what is the other side to this? Do you still think there are two sides?


Of course there are still 2 sides. I'm not trying to insinuate that they are both equally wrong. In fact, the teen is not wrong at all, even though i disagree with what she did. My point is politics does not belong in the classroom.


Who do you think brought the politics into the classroom, though? The student who's been sitting for ages or the faculty who got triggered by it, suddenly and conveniently after the NFL started doing it?



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: Abysha

from the article -


The senior student said her decision to sit was a silent protest against "police brutality" and "Donald Trump being President."


She herself made it pretty clear it was politically motivated.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: Abysha

from the article -


The senior student said her decision to sit was a silent protest against "police brutality" and "Donald Trump being President."


She herself made it pretty clear it was politically motivated.


And was a silent, non-disruptive form of protest, hence protected.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Of course, I will always defend her rights. Just like I disagreed with athletes taking a knee but defended their right to do it. I still believe politics doesn't belong in the classroom OR sports, among many other things as well.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:43 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: Abysha

from the article -


The senior student said her decision to sit was a silent protest against "police brutality" and "Donald Trump being President."


She herself made it pretty clear it was politically motivated.



But... who would have even known about it? I carry those thoughts and actions with me every day but nobody would know unless they confronted me about it with their politics.

The faculty is the only entity here bringing politics to school. The student just happened to be exercising her right to not be a sheep and her politics kept to herself otherwise.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence

originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: Abysha

from the article -


The senior student said her decision to sit was a silent protest against "police brutality" and "Donald Trump being President."


She herself made it pretty clear it was politically motivated.


And was a silent, non-disruptive form of protest, hence protected.



I still feel it's weird to even call it "protest". How is not participating in something a protest? If that's the only prerequisite, then tens of thousands of football fans are "protesting" when watching football during the anthem.

Sorry... side rant. Just getting to me that minding my own business could be considered a "protest".



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: Abysha



I still feel it's weird to even call it "protest". How is not participating in something a protest?

That's a very good point. She has been sitting during the Pledge for a long time and nobody cared and probably not knowing why until they made an issue out of it.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: rickymouse


This is different than what the NFL players are doing, you cannot compare the two.


Why can't we?


The NFL players are misusing their influence to force political position.


Whether or not they are misusing anything is an entirely subjective opinion. How are they "forcing" anything? Are you saying the existence of police brutality is a political position or that whether or not anyone should care is a political position?


They are beginning to think they are more important than our elected officials, after all they get ten times the amount of pay that elected officials get.


I'm not following. What does "important" mean specifically in that sentence? I'm assuming "influential" from context? Lots of people are more influential than most politicians, including in matters of politics. So what? Congress has an approval rating in the low 20s, if that.


to intimidate their followers to vote as they want to vote.


They're threatening fans now? With what?


They also do not respect the people who voted to get our president in


Not standing for the national anthem is a slight against Trump voters? That's certainly a very self-centered opinion.


and are disrespecting our government system.


Our government system has a lot of problems. That's why we have an extensible framework for making improvements. I'm really struggling to understand the point you're making here.


This is not freedom of speech, this is intimidation.


There you go again. How is taking a knee during the national anthem a threatening act? Who is being threatened and with what are they being threatened?


Where did I say threatened? I said intimidation, like the same thing you are unsuccessfully trying to do to me in your post.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:10 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel

That's not what the lawmakers said?

No, it's not.

Read your first excerpt again...

"Looks like standing is required. With a note, reciting is not mandatory."



Texas Education Code - EDUC § 25.082. School Day;  Pledges of Allegiance;  Minute of Silence

(a) A school day shall be at least seven hours each day, including intermissions and recesses.

(b) The board of trustees of each school district and the governing board of each open-enrollment charter school shall require students, once during each school day at each campus, to recite:

(1) the pledge of allegiance to the United States flag in accordance with 4 U.S.C. Section 4 ;  and

(2) the pledge of allegiance to the state flag in accordance with Subchapter C, Chapter 3100, Government Code.

(c) On written request from a student's parent or guardian, a school district or open-enrollment charter school shall excuse the student from reciting a pledge of allegiance under Subsection (b).

codes.findlaw.com...

Where in this law does it say kids are required to stand?

I get that standing is in accordance with federal guidelines, but if a kid is excused then I don't see how they could still be subject to any part of those guidelines.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:12 PM
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Meh america . They not happy unless they whining about something over there .
Give em all tissues .



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:12 PM
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This seems weird to me. I went to a Catholic school WAY back in the day and some of the students in my class would stay seated (can't remember if it was because they were another religion or what) and it was never a big deal.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: Abysha


I still feel it's weird to even call it "protest". How is not participating in something a protest?


To willfully not engage in a social ritual would be a form of protest.
edit on 8-10-2017 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence



To willfully not engage in a social ritual would be a form of protest.

I understood her point. Is Jehovah's Witnesses not engaging in a social ritual a form of protest?



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:23 PM
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originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: Liquesence



To willfully not engage in a social ritual would be a form of protest.

I understood her point. Is Jehovah's Witnesses not engaging in a social ritual a form of protest?


Yes, it is.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:23 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence

originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: Liquesence



To willfully not engage in a social ritual would be a form of protest.

I understood her point. Is Jehovah's Witnesses not engaging in a social ritual a form of protest?


Yes, it is.

For what?



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: Deaf Alien

originally posted by: Liquesence

originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: Liquesence



To willfully not engage in a social ritual would be a form of protest.

I understood her point. Is Jehovah's Witnesses not engaging in a social ritual a form of protest?


Yes, it is.

For what?


What is the ritual? The one in the SCOTUS case?



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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the pledge of allegiance to the United States flag in accordance with 4 U.S.C. Section 4



4 U.S.C. § 4 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 4. Flag and Seal, Seat of Government, and the States
§ 4. Pledge of allegiance to the flag;  manner of delivery

...should be rendered by standing at attention...


edit:


excuse the student from reciting a pledge of allegiance

edit on 10/8/2017 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:27 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

We're talking about the JWs not performing a social ritual. That isn't a form of protest. If they were in other countries like North Korea that definitely would be a form of protest. This student have always sat and nobody cared and probably never knew why so how can it be a protest?



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 09:27 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel

the pledge of allegiance to the United States flag in accordance with 4 U.S.C. Section 4



4 U.S.C. § 4 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 4. Flag and Seal, Seat of Government, and the States
§ 4. Pledge of allegiance to the flag;  manner of delivery

...should be rendered by standing at attention...


Where does that indicate it's unconstitutional or illegal to not do so?



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