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3,200-Year-Old Stone Inscription Tells of Trojan Prince, Sea People

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posted on Dec, 7 2017 @ 06:28 AM
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a reply to: Harte

isnt there now a known and accepted cataclysm that happened around 11,000 years ago in north america that humans survived

50,000 cubic feet of water melted from a glacier in one day .

Accorrding to that Graham Hancock and a few others , also stated there are 10million square Km of coastline swallowed after the last ice age melt




posted on Dec, 7 2017 @ 12:12 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: Harte

isnt there now a known and accepted cataclysm that happened around 11,000 years ago in north america that humans survived

Local, yes, not global.


50,000 cubic feet of water melted from a glacier in one day .

We don't actually know if any humans were in the way of that. I'm presuming you're talking about the Scablands, though that didn't happen in a one day melt. It was an ice wall collapsing and the lake behind it flowing out.


Accorrding to that Graham Hancock and a few others , also stated there are 10million square Km of coastline swallowed after the last ice age melt

At the rate of about 2-4 inches a year. If you were a tree, you'd be in deadly danger. Humans walk faster than that.



posted on Dec, 7 2017 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

A cataclysm around 11,000 years ago and Graham Hancock in the same post implies he's talking about the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis.

If so, to my knowledge that is not a "known and accepted" cataclysm.

Harte



posted on Dec, 7 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: spit69




I am thoroughly convinced that there is some truth in this and other things I've looked into since seeing a mermaid in June.

Did you get her number??

I am thoroughly convinced that there is some truth in this and other things I've looked into since seeing a mermaid in June.

Well, there is a lot of reason to believe in actual "sea people" in my opinion. Including sea captains noting sightings.
Ancient war with sea people.

www.soulask.com...



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 07:39 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

With regards to the 10 million square KM due to glacial ice melt , I did not mean to imply that this happened in the space of one day.

Graham Hancock had stated that marine archaeologists are looking for shipwrecks rather than lost cities and that there is at least 10 million square KM of land which used to be inhabited by pre flood communities , tribes , city states etc.

and that simply there is a lot of ground to cover.

Have you seen the the Joe rogan interview of Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson , Randall Carlson puts forth his evidence that this glacial melt and flood happened in the space of a day due to the current ripples on the ground.
The frequency and the wavelength indicated that the waves were incredibly huge and that the equivalent of 50,000 cubit meters of water per second were moving across the land (there is a name they use for this for waves at sea and use it for land as well now ) , I got that wrong, the volume of water moving was actually far greater due to the evidence shown on the current ripples left on the ground.

They have said this is now a well accepted theory that the scientists who were backing this theory had argued and fought their corner to have it accepted (harte aye it is the younger dryas theory). The evidence is there to see have a look see what you think.

They are saying the same groups involved with the climate change are the same groups who deny the younger dryas theory in archaeology
etc .

Its interesting to hear their theories and the alternative ideas , it makes sense what they are saying when you look at it. He makes a compelling arguement that this was caused by an ELE imapctor from deep space. Which there are a plethora of out there in the Oort cloud and as we move through the Taurid region twice a year. NASA currently spend the price of an attack helicopter a year on detecting these ELE objects .
One of those could wipe us out its pretty important to consider this research and how much damage it did.

edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 08:03 AM
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here is the timeline , some nice youtube user added for the video itself

1:52:20 - Camas Prairie, ripples. ( I believe this part describes the ripples and their frequency and amplitude)
2:02:20 - Ripples convergance.
2:32:00 - Columbia River potholes and cataracts, scarred farmland.
2:37:09 - Drone footage of "rock blade", pothole and the return of the ripples.
2:50:00 - NASA Photography of scablands.
2:52:00 - Google Earth scablands
3:00:40 - Questionable bathtub analogy
3:02:20 - Topographic map of Grand Coulee
3:03:34 - Google Earth image, Niagara falls for scale.
3:07:20 - Ground View, Niagara for scale
3:11:28 - Utah, Dry Cataracts
3:12:55 - Valles Calderas
3:14:20 - Some Rocks.
3:15:49 - Snake River
3:17:00 - Everything Changes. Everything.
3:17:28 - Sediment Load, Heh. More rocks.
3:20:35 - You thought you'd seen the last of them, you were wrong. RIPPLES
3:21:15 - Same ripples, aerial shot.
3:25:27 - Artists Rendition.
3:26:28 - Boulder, dudes for scale.
3:27:30 - Jaeger Rock
3:29:05 - Hancock Erratic, another Rock.
3:30:49 - Inside a Pothole.



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: Harte

No, i absolutely appreciate that (which i why i included the winky face) on my first reply.

I thought the Bronze Age collapse was more to do with a 300 year drought, according to fossilised grain records? I will dig out and post the link when i get time.



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 05:34 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: Byrd

Graham Hancock had stated that marine archaeologists are looking for shipwrecks rather than lost cities and that there is at least 10 million square KM of land which used to be inhabited by pre flood communities , tribes , city states etc.

and that simply there is a lot of ground to cover.

Mmmkay.


Have you seen the the Joe rogan interview of Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson ,

No, I don't watch videos. It's too easy for someone to convince you via verbal emotional tones. You lose that with papers (meaning the written word is a better source) and you can see the names and evaluate the arguments better.


Randall Carlson puts forth his evidence that this glacial melt and flood happened in the space of a day due to the current ripples on the ground.
The frequency and the wavelength indicated that the waves were incredibly huge and that the equivalent of 50,000 cubit meters of water per second were moving across the land (there is a name they use for this for waves at sea and use it for land as well now ) , I got that wrong, the volume of water moving was actually far greater due to the evidence shown on the current ripples left on the ground.

Sounds like the Scablands flood.


They have said this is now a well accepted theory that the scientists who were backing this theory had argued and fought their corner to have it accepted (harte aye it is the younger dryas theory). The evidence is there to see have a look see what you think.

Younger Dryas theory is not well accepted by scientists. There are a few who believe it, but the paleontologists and archaeologists present a pretty strong argument against it.


They are saying the same groups involved with the climate change are the same groups who deny the younger dryas theory in archaeology etc .

And that would be a "no."


Its interesting to hear their theories and the alternative ideas , it makes sense what they are saying when you look at it. He makes a compelling arguement that this was caused by an ELE imapctor from deep space. Which there are a plethora of out there in the Oort cloud and as we move through the Taurid region twice a year. NASA currently spend the price of an attack helicopter a year on detecting these ELE objects .
One of those could wipe us out its pretty important to consider this research and how much damage it did.

It sounds interesting, but if you start learning geology, paleontology, and basic astronomy you're going to find out just how improbable the idea is.



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: Harte

No, i absolutely appreciate that (which i why i included the winky face) on my first reply.

I thought the Bronze Age collapse was more to do with a 300 year drought, according to fossilised grain records? I will dig out and post the link when i get time.

The Bronze Age collapse has been discussed here on ATS. That's what I read too. There's a (fairly) recent thread about it around here.

Regarding Hancock, I certainly wouldn't take his word. And the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis he endorses in his latest book has been refuted by other evidence, had been even before he published. There's a good thread here on that topic too.

IOW, it's still up in the air (no pun intended.)

Lastly, I certainly don't believe that the rate of sea level rise was at any time fast enough to wipe anyone out, so anything people were doing in now-submerged areas they also did in non-submerged areas.

Since it is FAR cheaper, simpler and easier to do archaeology on land, and since the only thing you'll likely find underwater is somewhat older versions of what you can find on land, you can understand why the seafloor isn't being combed for evidence of cultures.

That said, there ARE several underwater sites that were covered because of the ice melt. Some Jomon sites come to mind.

But, again, the Jomon were all over the place. Nobody lived only near the beach.


Harte
edit on 12/8/2017 by Harte because: of the wonderful things he does!



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

it's certainly peaked my interest in those fields of study thats for sure.
So much so i'll need to go and read papers , the thing is I probably wouldnt have bothered before if it wasnt for this theory and even watching that interview. At least I'll maybe learn something new and that's not a bad thing.
They maybe emotional but the information is still being passed on , and thats encouraging people like me to go and look for more answers.

Even if the theory isnt accepted and it's wrong these things encourage people with a mystery and they get into it.

I'll certainly check out some papers on the subjects and see whats what, However searching for papers is a little difficult because really you need to know what your looking for, or am I simply overlooking the obvious
google scientific studies on the younger dryas theory, scablands flood etc :S

I find it really interesting and wanted to share it with you all , and finally just because it seems improbable doesnt make it impossible, given how mysterious reality is anyway.

Thankfully we have science to help unravel the mystery !

and thanks again for replying as I see you are involved in these fields of study so its good to have your opinion here.

edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: Harte

I'll need to read that thread , like I said its got me looking for more answers , even if its been refuted im just interested to know more now.

I'll see if I can find that thread and have a read.

In any case if you were human and alive to witness something like that happening it would freeze you to the spot before you perished. Imagine watching a giant meteor explode and melt the ice into a giant river of ice , rock and earth hurtling towards you in a tsunami like fashion, doesnt even bare thinking about the stuff of mad apocalypse hollywood movies haha.

The Jomon , i've honestly never heard that name so will have to read more, I have a few books of ancient civilsations my uncle gave me possibly they are written about in one of those books.
I have always had an interest in ancient cultures and myths, Hamlets Mill was a decent book , which really got me interested in these fields. I started to read all of the creation myths of various cultures and they all have the same themes as outlined in Hamlets Mill.

I'll definitely check out that thread if I can find it , and read up on the Jomon .
Whilst working on the land maybe cheaper there maybe a culture hidden under the sea the likes we have never seen before , one which isnt anything like the cultures we know of. That would be amazing.

Also thanks for the reply
edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Harte

ahhhh those Jomon statue / figurines I recognise those like!

I really like their sculpting style , they were clearly very talented artists.
If only we had a time machine to go and vist them eh!

is it this thread ?
YDB biblical flood

thanks
edit on 8-12-2017 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: Harte

ahhhh those Jomon statue / figurines I recognise those like!

I really like their sculpting style , they were clearly very talented artists.
If only we had a time machine to go and vist them eh!

is it this thread ?
YDB biblical flood

thanks

I couldn't tell you where to find it. You know how it is around here. It might have been a thread about something completely insane, but somebody commented on the Bronze Age collapse and it turned into page after page about that. Same with the YD Impact stuff. It's here. You could use a site specific google search for it. I haven't used the crappy search function here in years.

The Jomon were making pottery 16 thousand years ago. Just wanted to put that out there because it blows my mind.

Harte



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: Byrd

it's certainly peaked my interest in those fields of study thats for sure.
So much so i'll need to go and read papers , the thing is I probably wouldnt have bothered before if it wasnt for this theory and even watching that interview. At least I'll maybe learn something new and that's not a bad thing.
They maybe emotional but the information is still being passed on , and thats encouraging people like me to go and look for more answers.


Hey, let me give you some links that you might enjoy:

Wikipedia on the Scablands (a good place to start)

USGS on the Scablands with information about the geology

If you prefer videos, Khan Academy has an intro to geology In order to understand what's right and what's wrong, you need to know a bit about geology. It's fascinating because it tells stories of our planet.

...and then you might like to go look at geological maps of your area (and check out books on fossils of your area and gemstones of your area. Scotland has some absolutely fabulous geology (we visited Scotland with a tour group and it was rather funny at stops... everyone else would hop out and look at flowers and trees and we were going "oooh! Pegmatite!" "Look at the layering!" "Gneiss!" "volcanoes!") (Wikipedia's geology of Scotland) - and don't forget to google "geology of Scotland map" (here's one!)

Then the Pleistocene extinction event and theories and notice how it plays out differently around the world.

Comet hypothesis section - notice that none of the evidence is actually on the side of "yes, comet did it." My observations are that while some species died in the extinction event, others of the same size and ecological niche survived. Comets as killers are generalists (kill everything in an area... or most things) and not specialists (kill only short faced bears but not grizzly bears or black bears or brown bears.)



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

Hey thanks mate, I will definitely read up on this , I have had an interest in Geology my cousin Corrine got her degree from St/Andrews Uni in Environmental Geo-science and so because she is my big cousin Id always listen to her stories about geology or what she was studying.

Thanks again for all of those links I will definitely check them out , my partner and I are both into collecting crystals of quartz etc so we have a general interest in finding them in Scotland a gem stone specialist produced a map of the regions and where to find them as well.

We have been collecting stones for a while now , have some really nice ones.
My personal favourite is Amethyst quartz, Labradorite, Titanium Aura quartz, Fire Opal , some of the best ones going in my opinion I just cant believe something looks like the way they do!
Truly the most beautiful rocks nature has to give.

In my opinion they are far more precious than diamonds.
here is the link to that map.

Im dying to go up north for some hill walking and climbing and see if I can goto any of these spots and find some rare minerals and crystals.

gemstsones of scotland



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: Byrd

Thanks again for all of those links I will definitely check them out , my partner and I are both into collecting crystals of quartz etc so we have a general interest in finding them in Scotland a gem stone specialist produced a map of the regions and where to find them as well.

We have been collecting stones for a while now , have some really nice ones.
My personal favourite is Amethyst quartz, Labradorite, Titanium Aura quartz, Fire Opal , some of the best ones going in my opinion I just cant believe something looks like the way they do!
Truly the most beautiful rocks nature has to give.

In my opinion they are far more precious than diamonds.
here is the link to that map.

Im dying to go up north for some hill walking and climbing and see if I can goto any of these spots and find some rare minerals and crystals.

gemstsones of scotland


I love fire opals and fire agates (more of a Texas thing, that last one.) If we'd had your map when we visited Scotland, we'd probably have run off for some fossicking!

Geology and Earth Science often get a fairly short shrift in schools because it's hard to teach if you also have to maintain class order and make sure as many as possible can pass a test. Field trips can also be a problem if you're with students. This is sad, because there's nothing like getting kids involved in a "treasure hunt" to get them interested in and passionate about geology. Here in Texas, fossils of clams are so common that you could send kids fossil hunting in the gravel you can buy by the yard at a garden supply store.

Anyway, learning about geology gives you a better insight into time and a better understanding about why an idea by a layman might be right or might be wrong. You're lucky to live in a place with such wonderful geology - a place that's actually important in the history of the discipline of geology.



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

I guess i've always had an interest in geology I took higher geography in highschool and also because of my cousin , our class had its fair share of disruptions so much so that my teacher Mr Grant kept a Brick in his desk in the top drawer and he would take it out and throw it at you if you were being disruptive. If it was the first time he done it to you, you would actually # yourself as it hurtled towards your face only to realise when it hit you it was a foam faux brick. The design was so convincing it looked exactly like a red brick.

The guy that previously owned my parents house was a geologist and a stone mason. So there are plenty of various types of stones just lying around on their property.
I'll need to get hold of a tumbler so I can prepare any rough stones I find.

If there are any specific areas of interest to you I could take a look, sort of like a drone for you haha



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

Here in Texas, fossils of clams are so common that you could send kids fossil hunting in the gravel you can buy by the yard at a garden supply store.


I can attest to that, having lived in a house with a gravel driveway in Dallas back when I was little. There were also occasionally some sort of snail shells too. Or at least snaily-looking.

Harte



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

This place is just down the road from me ...neat spot



posted on Dec, 11 2017 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Byrd

Here in Texas, fossils of clams are so common that you could send kids fossil hunting in the gravel you can buy by the yard at a garden supply store.


I can attest to that, having lived in a house with a gravel driveway in Dallas back when I was little. There were also occasionally some sort of snail shells too. Or at least snaily-looking.

Harte


Possibly exogyra or ammonites.



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