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British Foreign Secretary recited Kipling poem "MANDALAY" day before Las Vegas Incident.

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posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:04 PM
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This is just a weird coincidence, but the British Foreign Secretary BORIS JOHNSON was reported the day before the "MANDALAY BAY" Las Vegas Incident as being politically inappropriate when he recited Rudyard Kipling's "MANDALAY" in a Myanmar Temple.

The Cabinet Minister and MP Boris Johnson was told off by the MSM and his own party for quoting the the poem because of its links to Britain's past colonial rule of India and Territories in the days of the Empire. Kipling is very much a colonialist poet because of his links with colonial India before independence. Boris was censured because of his insensitivity.

www.theguardian.com...



The British foreign secretary was caught uttering the opening verse to Rudyard Kipling's "MANDALAY" when he visited the Shwedagon Pagoda, the most sacred Buddhist site in Myanmar's capital, Yangon. Kipling’s poem captures the nostalgia of a retired serviceman looking back on his colonial service and a Burmese girl he kissed. Johnson’s impromptu recital was so embarrassing that the UK ambassador to Myanmar, Andrew Patrick, was forced to stop him. The incident was captured by a film crew for Channel 4 and will form part of a documentary, Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition, to be broadcast on Sunday at 10.05pm. Britain colonised Myanmar from 1824 to 1948 and fought three wars in the 19th century, suppressing widespread resistance


Here is Kipling's poem:

www.arctracer.com...

"By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin' lazy at the sea,
There's a Burma girl a-settin', and I know she thinks o' me;
For the wind is in the palm-trees, and the temple-bells they say:
"Come you back, you British soldier; come you back to Mandalay!"
Come you back to Mandalay,
Where the old Flotilla lay:
Can't you 'ear their paddles chunkin' from Rangoon to MANDALAY?
On the road to Mandalay,
Where the flyin'-fishes play,
An' the dawn comes up like thunder outer China 'crost the BAY!"

The consensus is that Boris behaved very strangely in choosing to recite a colonial British poem is such a sensitive situation. He was reprimanded for it. His political future is in doubt this weekend because he has caused so much damage arguably to the UK in many ways.

Strange coincidences all round. Perhaps we are in some strange matrix?

EDIT: The poem is actually entitled "MANDALAY". Edited accordingly, even better score!


edit on 7-10-2017 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: Revolution9

There are no coincidences. Just pariahs. The Uk is kneedeep in unpleasant smelly brown stuff.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Revolution9

There are no coincidences. Just pariahs. The Uk is kneedeep in unpleasant smelly brown stuff.


I wish I could disagree with you, but I can't. Hope you are keeping well my friend. Best wishes to you.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Revolution9

There are no coincidences. Just pariahs. The Uk is kneedeep in unpleasant smelly brown stuff.


Pray do tell , how so ?



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: gortex

What? The coincidence part? Or the brown smelly things? Or how it's all connected to Johnson?



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:39 PM
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The Guardian (source in the OP) is a fine newspaper, but it has some terrible habits, and decrying Kipling as some kind of bigoted blimp from the British Empire is a typical knee-jerk take. (They are also keen on rubbishing Winston Churchill at any opportunity). Kipling's a great poet, unjustly neglected, and Mandalay is about an old soldier reminiscing over a love-affair with a Burmese girl.

Also, this incident took place in January, rather than immediately before the Vegas massacre, and the programme featuring the video of Johnson's little recital was already in its finished edit before Paddock's crime took place.

It's an interesting coincidence, but not a meaningful one.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

Just interested to know how we are kneedeep in unpleasant smelly brown stuff, in the grand scale of things Johnson is an irrelevance who has shot himself in the foot so many times he has no feet left.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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Very interesting. The synchronicities are starting to pop up and this is a real big one!

BTW, that brown stuff is usually red


Also, the coincidence in the Anglo guy having an affair with an Asian woman also is particularly interesting as Paddock’s Asian paramour comes to mind.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Nah you're fine. You got awesome people like Johnson and May take care of you, what could go wrong...



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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The only strange thing in this incident is that people are surprised that a product of classic British education might want to quote a classic British poet.

Yet more of the usual liberal media/academia getting their knickers in a twist over absolutely nothing.

Colonialism happened. Get over it. No other nation is still expected to be ashamed of its colonial heritage.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Kipling changed his opinion after his son was killed in WW1; he lost the zeal for those patriotic poems.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: gortex

Nah you're fine. You got awesome people like Johnson and May take care of you, what could go wrong...

All things considered I'd still take them over what we see in the US.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: Revolution9
An' the dawn comes up like thunder outer China 'crost the BAY!"

Leaving aside for a moment the question of political correctness, I've always been puzzled by the geography of this line.
WHAT "bay"? There is no sea between Mandalay and China- they are part of the same landmass.
Only from the viewpoint of eastern India would the dawn be coming up " 'crost the bay [of Bengal]", so I suspect Kipling of unconsciously slipping into the Indian perspective, perhaps remembering days in Calcutta.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: cheesyleps
Yet more of the usual liberal media/academia getting their knickers in a twist over absolutely nothing.


Agree with that, the caveat being that this was a minor diplomatic incident. Whatever the average Briton thinks about Kipling, you can understand why the British ambassador was anxious to stop Johnson from creating yet more international embarrassment.

To their credit, the Burmese don't seem to have given much of a stuff about the incident, which gives you some idea of how (non)newsworthy it is outside the UK.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Yes, you have it exactly. Edgar Allen Poe was like that, too. He was criticised for his "Days of Yore". There is actually no such thing as that. They just say that Kipling used poetic license as did Poe. That's cool by me.

This Boris referring to it is a bit strange? There is an obvious link between the Mandalay Bay of the hotel name and the poem. I wonder if they who first owned the hotel named it after the poem, the bay, or both? Either way it's "BAY" don't you say? If it was just Mandalay and no bay it would be okay, but to have Mandalay and bay in the same poem is kind of spooky I say(deliberate rhyming here).

Was it just innocent or was Boris giving out a coded warning, or engaged in some kind of ritual in public. He rings that Temple bell twice. We can only say coincidence, but it is a mighty strange one.


edit on 7-10-2017 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:55 PM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: Revolution9

Kipling changed his opinion after his son was killed in WW1; he lost the zeal for those patriotic poems.



Thanks for telling. I don't know much about Kipling. Hope those naughty Masons aren't giving codes to each other in public again, lol (only joking kinda).



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:55 PM
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Kipling's actually quite a good poet. He did some fantastic children's books and the Just So Stories are brilliant for kids today. He's a product of his time.

The Foreign Secretary quoting him is hardly a crime. It is a coincidence that another mass murder happened the next day in the States.

Anyway, a bit off topic but my fav Kipling poems are:

- Gethsemene - Kipling's son was killed in WW1
- If - probably his best known
- A Dead Statesman - Very topical



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
Only from the viewpoint of eastern India would the dawn be coming up " 'crost the bay [of Bengal]", so I suspect Kipling of unconsciously slipping into the Indian perspective, perhaps remembering days in Calcutta.


I wonder if that is Kipling providing a big clue about the unreliability of the narrator's memory. This love-affair in the poem took place years before the narrator's recollection. Perhaps he was hinting at some wishful thinking on the old soldier's part. I mean, it's a big error and Kipling himself doesn't seem to have made any such error anywhere else.

The "unreliable narrator" is definitely a 'thing' in literature, and Kipling's a bit of an ironist at times (hence, perhaps, his undeserved reputation as an unthinking patriot).



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: Revolution9

The weird thing is that there is only a Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. In Mandalay there is no bay. It's landlocked.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

He was a great writer and deserves his position in the Hall of Fame of Great British people.



originally posted by: gortex

originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: gortex

Nah you're fine. You got awesome people like Johnson and May take care of you, what could go wrong...

All things considered I'd still take them over what we see in the US.


Definitely!


a reply to: Revolution9

The most successful UK pro-war poets like Jessie Pope and Kipling weren't on the front lines. In contrast, Owen, Sassoon and Brookes saw WW1 action and their poetry took the pragmatic approach of admiring heroism whilst murdering the glamour of warfare.




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