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Lessons to be learned from the NFL issue...so far.

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posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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Of course, this is from my personal perspective....it's the only one I have, after all.

For years, if not decades, I have looked forward to the fall sports arriving. It was an escape from work, politics, even family and economic issues. Virtually any and all worries, concerns....negatives, any and all having to do with life and living.

An escape.

Others may not have even considered spectator sports an escape. One 'could' take it on step further and label it a form of substitute life. Having a fairly mundane existence, many would identify with great teams, great players. yes, even actors. Those achieving a level of excellence the rest of us hadn't and holding them in an unreasonable level of esteem.

The polls apparently bear out the loss of this escape. One poll showed an 80% disapproval of politics entering the football arena in any form. The numbers were less for kneeling during the anthem, 64% disapproval rating. ( At a guess, the right to protest became a factor in the decision process.)
Those number dropped further on President Trump's opinion that kneelers should be fired from their teams. Down to 44%.

I completely understand Trump's views on this, especially from his business background. What business would tolerate an employee going out of his way to disaffect potentially 50% of his customer base? Obviously few, unless the owner was in complete agreement with that stance and wanted to use his business/status for a political statement. As the vast majority of us are not business owners, many have taken pause at that comment. I do not.

Now that politics has almost irrevocably entered Professional football, the NFL find itself between a rock and a hard place. Noting that College football, MLB and the NHL has judicially decided to remain outside this mess and have gained numbers as a result of the NFL's hand-wringing policy, the NFL is in a lose-lose scenario.

Obviously, they underestimated the response level and duration that will likely result-it would be wise if all others in the political arena and business,for that matter, re-evaluate the strength of the grass-root's potential response- and they have no recourse other than to ban any political statement, from either 'camp', and affect policy to that effect. ( the 80% poll number being the overriding issue.)

There is much more on this to discuss. It may come up in this thread or on another down the road. We shall see where this goes....




posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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One poll showed an 80% disapproval of politics entering the football arena in any form.


ONE poll. Ok. You know what Homer said:





Secondly, do these anonymous "disapprovers" even follow football?



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: intrepid


A good question. The same point can be made for those supporting the kneelers, however.

That points out another problem with allowing one's business to go 'political'
. Those outside the fraternity of football jump into the fray.

Someone throw a flag for 'piling on'.


edit on 7-10-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Funny Thursday night numbers weren't down at all.

Maybe it's all bs and nobody really cares that much.

People are lazy they think standing up for the flag supports the troops.

Yet make no big deal out of the treatment of vets when they get home and are labotimized with pharmaceuticals after getting ptsd.

Nobody protests for the soldiers well being. Except maybe the guys protesting in the NFL who can shed some light on what it's like for the vets coming home to racism.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker


There is only one lesson to be learned from this situation.

Pissing off a bunch of people will not get the problems resolved.
Nothing will change.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: nwtrucker

Funny Thursday night numbers weren't down at all.

Maybe it's all bs and nobody really cares that much.

People are lazy they think standing up for the flag supports the troops.

Yet make no big deal out of the treatment of vets when they get home and are labotimized with pharmaceuticals after getting ptsd.

Nobody protests for the soldiers well being. Except maybe the guys protesting in the NFL who can shed some light on what it's like for the vets coming home to racism.


Good points. I'd make the case it's more than supporting the troops, however. It is about nation. The entity that bound us together that was above political view. More important than any one ideology or faction. The glue that both protects those factions and views AND trumps them in overall worth.
edit on 7-10-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Tell that to Anquan Boldin and Malcom Jenkins

Or the entire civil rights movement?



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:45 AM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker

[...]
Now that politics has almost irrevocably entered Professional football, [...]



Politics entered football when the DoD began paying the NFL to put the players on the field for the national anthem.

We could go back to the days prior to that and while I’m sure a handful of the narrow-scope nationalists who insist on the anthem being a part of every waking moment of everyday life would be upset, I guarantee the majority of America wouldn’t care and you’d simultaneously solve the problem of everybody getting upset at the method of protest.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: nwtrucker

Funny Thursday night numbers weren't down at all.

Maybe it's all bs and nobody really cares that much.

People are lazy they think standing up for the flag supports the troops.

Yet make no big deal out of the treatment of vets when they get home and are labotimized with pharmaceuticals after getting ptsd.

Nobody protests for the soldiers well being. Except maybe the guys protesting in the NFL who can shed some light on what it's like for the vets coming home to racism.


Good points. I'd make the case it's more than supporting the troops, however. It is about nation. The entity that bound us together that was above political view. More important than any one ideology or faction. The glue that both protects those factions and views AND trumps them in overall worth.


Aren't these guys saying something is broken?

Now I personally agree with you. The last thing I want when trying to decompress is more politics.

However having been a ncaa wrestler and a coach I know not everyone has the same life. Some people's first steady housing and meals were after getting scholarships for athletics.

It's unfortunate the conversation is happening the way it is through the games and the flag but having seen first hand the lives of some of these athletes and how they rose up above the crap they were handed allows me some room to be less judgemental. I personally don't know if I have the innate moral character some of the athletes who have made a life for themselves out of literally nothing but hard work and dedication. So I am less bothered than some over it.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker


I do not agree with the kneeling, however, this is the United States, last time I checked there is absolutely nothing wrong with a peaceful display of protest.

Again I don't agree, but it is their right. The bully in chief, is a moron, and spewed a bunch of stuff out as usual that is BS.






posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker
a reply to: intrepid


A good question. The same point can be made for those supporting the kneelers, however.




Then there are the fans that would like both you you guys to butt out and leave our game alone.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: intrepid

Yep,

Anquan Boldin did it right. He quit and started doing massive amount of social work after his cousin was shot in Florida. The officer in that case is probably going to jail. Of course he was 37 so it's easier for him to quit but several players knew the kneeling would glaze over the subject anyway and decided to do other things like raise a fist or lock arms.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: luthier

Just an afterthought on your post. Very valid, IMO. Perhaps the response is due to the fact that, individually, the issues your raise are dumped in the apathy trash bin. Things that 'I can't do much about'. 'It's politics and nothing will change'.

The anthem? With a fly-over? The pride. The thrill. My house. My kind of people. Take your crap out of here.

An unsuspected, massive trigger. One that perhaps may lead to more political participation by those that previously ignored it.

edit on 7-10-2017 by nwtrucker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:02 AM
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The NFL would much rather have this topic of political protest, rather than the topic of CTE and brain damage. CTE could end American football or completely change it. Kneeing will not change much.

Before this whole debate came up, people were talking about not letting kids play any football. A very dangerous conversation for the NFL.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: intrepid


LOL. That was the point I made in the OP. Everyone needs an 'out'. Me too.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

I would hope. That blm guy that went nuts and shot Dallas cops was a vet.

The ptsd and coming home to racism is an issue.

Imagine how the blacks felt in ww2, korea, and Vietnam pre civil rights when they came home.

Now we have let the police and public distrust get outrageous.

Cops are killing whites as well.

There is an issue with poor training, screening, and pay. Officers are asked to pick up the garbage and paid and trained poorly to do it. 80 percent are out of shape..protected by unions....

It's just a mess in this identity politics world.

I very much appreciate your consideration and thought even though we may disagree.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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The NFL is still a thing?

I switched it off and that was that. It was years after the MLB strike before I tuned in a game again as well since it screwed the Reds out of a post-season.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker
a reply to: intrepid


LOL. That was the point I made in the OP. Everyone needs an 'out'. Me too.



AND my Niners might actually win this week.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:08 AM
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originally posted by: intrepid

originally posted by: nwtrucker
a reply to: intrepid


LOL. That was the point I made in the OP. Everyone needs an 'out'. Me too.



AND my Niners might actually win this week.


Must be playing the Browns.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: blueman12
The NFL would much rather have this topic of political protest, rather than the topic of CTE and brain damage. CTE could end American football or completely change it. Kneeing will not change much.

Before this whole debate came up, people were talking about not letting kids play any football. A very dangerous conversation for the NFL.



I hadn't considered that possibility...A deflection of attention away from more 'dangerous' issues. A standard D.C. political activity....

Sigh, the deeper one digs, the more stink gets exposed.

Appreciate the thought.




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