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The First Amendment & Boobs

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posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: CulturalResilience
What would constitute toxic femininity?

This is my first attempt at embedding too, maybe I should include a Language Warning




edit on 10-7-2017 by Morningglory because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

I don't think what he said nor their reactions were out of line. The other two seemed more shocked than anything, as if they thought they were speaking to a professional analyst or something.

Through his talking, it sounds like he's got his own radio thing going on, likely with a little cheap shock value thrown in for ratings. It seemed like they just didn't know who he was.

If that were Howard Stern who said it, I imagine they'd still be shocked but wouldn't bother chastising him and would probably even chuckle a bit.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Certainly funny that a woman finds a man basically saying he likes boobs offensive.


Except... he didn't say he likes boobs. He said he "believes in" boobs as if they're something mythical like Santa, Unicorns, or the Tooth Fairy that requires "belief".

I require no belief. I've actually seen, and even touched them! I know they exist. Maybe he just needs to get off the radio, and get out more. What he said was quite odd.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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Whatever happened to manners and being a gentleman?



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:04 AM
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heh

I like 'em all

boobies


tits


pussy


and ass


I wish I had a zoo...



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:11 AM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope

Whatever happened to manners and being a gentleman?


I think it's still there in RL. In the media though everyone always has to make a point or go for the shock value.


“The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about.”

Oscar Wilde


thinkexist.com...
edit on 7-10-2017 by intrepid because: For attribution.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Third-wave feminism kinda killed chivalry (aka: being a gentleman with manners).

Now, it's often considered offensive to do something as simple as holding a door for a woman. It's often seen as projecting the message, "Here ya go 'little lady'. I know women aren't capable of opening, or holding a door on their own; so, let a man help you.".

Today, being a gentleman is often simply considered to be patronizing and chauvinistic.
edit on 10/7/17 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:21 AM
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IGMO broad... BOOBS , boobs, like boobs. Most woman have them to some degree hanging on their chest. Feigning ignorance or astonishment only gives way to the other commentator and her coming off as dullards, fools, imbeciles, morons, stupid and nothing more than bloviating ignoramuses.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: redmage
a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Third-wave feminism kinda killed chivalry (aka: being a gentleman with manners).

Now, it's often considered offensive to do something as simple as holding a door for a woman. It's often seen as projecting the message, "Here ya go 'little lady'. I know women aren't capable of opening, or holding a door on their own; so let me (a big, strong man) help you.".

Today, being a gentleman is often simply considered to be patronizing and chauvinistic.



I once had an old man rush in front of me to pull a push-only door open for me. After two tries, I impatiently pushed it open and held it for him.

He actually gave me a scowl and scurried inside.

The way that made me feel inside broke my heart and changed my thoughts on the whole thing. I don't want to make people feel like that for trying to help me.

Sure, it's old fashioned but it's good old fashioned.

The biggest flaw working against feminism is we don't pick our battles as well as we should.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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Ouch! Reminds me of the old Gary Larson comic strip The Far Side. He had one showing a "School for the Gifted" with a kid pushing with all his might... against a door that says "pull".


originally posted by: Abysha
The biggest flaw working against feminism is we don't pick our battles as well as we should.


Personally, I always make the distinction when it comes to "third-wave" feminism, and the issue of poorly chosen battles certainly does seem to plague it.

Coming from a guy living in a small-to-mid sized city (with a major University), the basic rule I've found is that I can freely hold a door for any male; however, when it comes to women, if a female looks under the age of 30, or has Manic Panic dyed hair... it's much safer to just let them manage on their own.
edit on 10/7/17 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope

Whatever happened to manners and being a gentleman?



That has been beaten out of young men by feminism.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: intrepid
I like boobies too.


I wish the kid said "I like Boobs"








edit on 7-10-2017 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: redmage
a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Third-wave feminism kinda killed chivalry (aka: being a gentleman with manners).

Now, it's often considered offensive to do something as simple as holding a door for a woman. It's often seen as projecting the message, "Here ya go 'little lady'. I know women aren't capable of opening, or holding a door on their own; so, let a man help you.".

Today, being a gentleman is often simply considered to be patronizing and chauvinistic.


My reply is to your post, but this is actually directed at men in general with regard to the matter of perceived chivalry...

I can honestly say that in all my trips around the Sun, I have never witnessed anyone taking umbrage with anyone else for opening a door for them...male or female. Not once. And I live in a very large city where both sexes open doors for others all over it, every single day.

If you're holding a door open for someone else, what is the motivation behind it in the first place? If you're doing it so people will recognize your "chivalry" and shower you with praise and gratitude, then you're doing it for yourself rather than the person you're holding it for.

That's not chivalrous. That is a self-serving action meant to make you feel like you're sacrificing your energy to help someone else out and expecting to be rewarded for it...even if the person didn't ask you for help and you instead made a personal choice to assume your help was even needed in the first place, and open the door.

If the person asked you to get the door for them and then fails to thank you...or gets angry about it...then I could definitely see there being something wrong with that. But if they didn't ask and you did it anyway, then your expectation of gratitude is completely unfounded...and turns your chivalrous act into a selfish play for adulation and recognition.

I open doors for people all the time and most people thank me for it...but a lot of them don't, and that includes plenty of males. Do I notice? Sometimes, yes. Do I care? No. Because that's not the reason I choose to open the door.

I do it because it's a polite thing to do for another person, and it costs me nothing to do it except for a couple seconds of my time. And if they don't acknowledge it, that's OK...because they didn't ask for my assistance in the first place. I'll still keep opening doors and helping old ladies cross the street and picking things up for people when they drop them, and I'll do it regardless of whether they thank me or not, because I personally believe in the Law of Attraction...and because it's a kind, simple thing to do.

If chivalry is truly dead, then I say good riddance. No one should ever commit simple acts of kindness because some contrived societal rule book tells them to.

No one should measure another person's character or worth by whether or not they choose to offer unsolicited assistance to a complete stranger based on that either...when you play by other people's rules, you are not thinking for yourself. And if you stop doing kind things for others simply because society says a certain level of gratitude must be expressed in order for it to be worth your time doing it, then you are acting on an agenda for someone else and have subverted your own authenticity in favor of that.

F*ck chivalry. Go out and be a rebel and open a door for a stranger, without expecting anything in return, because you want to show kindness to your fellow human beings.

When we are kind to other people for no reason other than an unconditional desire to help, we change our own energy to one that is positive and that attracts positive circumstances back to us. When we help others without expectations or conditions, we quite literally become a better person for having done it...even if the other person doesn't appear to be grateful for it.

Society won't tell us that this is true. They don't want us thinking and acting on our own. Well, f*ck them too.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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This is what I took away from watching the video.

BG(boob guy): "I believe in two things" "the first amendment and boobs"

NA(news anchor): "wait, did you just say b.."

BG: "Yup, two things, the first amendment and boobies"

NA: "you said (spelling) b o o b s?"

BG: "NO, not (spelling) b o o b s" " I said BOOBS!"

BG: "but it's more about the first" "I believe in the first amendment so much, I'm not afraid to say I believe in boobs"

NA: "but, but you can't say (still spelling) b o o b s"

BG: "the first amendment begs to differ"

NA: "but that's offensive"

BG: "not as offensive as hindering the right to free speech" "which is why I believe in two things, boobs and the right to say boobs on TV"



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: RainyState

I think a better retort would have been "Well I also believe two things; 1st amendment and large penises".

I'd love to see his reaction to that. And the poor guy on the left would just be at a loss for words, lol.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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You chose my post to reply to "men in general", but being that it's my post that's the target I'll see if I can address some of your thoughts.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
My reply is to your post, but this is actually directed at men in general with regard to the matter of perceived chivalry...


Just to be clear. In regards to "perceived chivalry" I was referring to chivalry simply in the sense of being "a gentleman with manners". Someone who is kind to others, civilized, and possessing manners.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
I can honestly say that in all my trips around the Sun, I have never witnessed anyone taking umbrage with anyone else for opening a door for them...male or female. Not once. And I live in a very large city where both sexes open doors for others all over it, every single day.


I'm glad you've had the pleasure of not having to experience or witness such ugliness, and wish everyone could share in that experience and sentiment. Unfortunately my experience has been different than yours. I'm also guessing that you're not a white male over the age of 35.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
If you're holding a door open for someone else, what is the motivation behind it in the first place? If you're doing it so people will recognize your "chivalry" and shower you with praise and gratitude, then you're doing it for yourself rather than the person you're holding it for.


Wow! That's quite the leap to jump to! Shower with praise and gratitude? I wouldn't think that anyone would expect such for simply opening or holding a door. Personally, I suppose my "motivation" is simply being friendly and polite like I was taught as a child. I was a scout in my youth, grew up in the Midwest, and we tend to be generally friendly, polite, and kind to others.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
That's not chivalrous. That is a self-serving action meant to make you feel like you're sacrificing your energy to help someone else out and expecting to be rewarded for it...even if the person didn't ask you for help and you instead made a personal choice to assume your help was even needed in the first place, and open the door.

If the person asked you to get the door for them and then fails to thank you...or gets angry about it...then I could definitely see there being something wrong with that. But if they didn't ask and you did it anyway, then your expectation of gratitude is completely unfounded...and turns your chivalrous act into a selfish play for adulation and recognition.


Going further and further down the rabbit hole with that LEAP of assumptions. I don't think it's generally assumed by most anyone that help is "needed" with doors. It's simply a polite thing to do.

Do you often assume the absolute worst of intentions when it comes to addressing "men in general"? Perhaps that's part of the root of the issues I've experienced with the younger crowd if your assumptions of poor intentions are also widely prevalent with kids these days.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
I open doors for people all the time and most people thank me for it...but a lot of them don't, and that includes plenty of males. Do I notice? Sometimes, yes. Do I care? No. Because that's not the reason I choose to open the door.


That's more in line with the majority of experiences when it comes to opening/holding doors for others.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
I do it because it's a polite thing to do for another person, and it costs me nothing to do it except for a couple seconds of my time. And if they don't acknowledge it, that's OK...because they didn't ask for my assistance in the first place. I'll still keep opening doors and helping old ladies cross the street and picking things up for people when they drop them, and I'll do it regardless of whether they thank me or not, because I personally believe in the Law of Attraction...and because it's a kind, simple thing to do.


That's my general take on it as well. The only issues I've really had is with women who appear to be 18-24, and a few who may have been slightly older but had vibrant Manic Panic hair colors. I'm absolutely fine with no acknowledgement. The problems I've had is with serious attitudes and hostility coming from the younger crowd. Scowls, "F**** you cis-male! I can do it myself!", and even an elbow to shove me out of the way on one occasion (from one of the Manic Panic dye jobs), etc.. Entirely not worth it. Maybe third-wave isn't as prevalent in your neck of the woods. Here we have a major University where it's quite prevalent when semesters are in session, and heterosexual white males are apparently their public enemy #1.

The good news is that more and more public places now have automatic doors.



originally posted by: tigertatzen
If chivalry is truly dead, then I say good riddance. No one should ever commit simple acts of kindness because some contrived societal rule book tells them to.


Again, I was referring to chivalry simply in the sense of being "a gentleman with manners". Someone who is kind to others, civilized, and possessing manners. Why should we say "good riddance" to that? Are societal expectations of having manners in public really such a bad thing?


originally posted by: tigertatzen
No one should measure another person's character or worth by whether or not they choose to offer unsolicited assistance to a complete stranger based on that either...when you play by other people's rules, you are not thinking for yourself. And if you stop doing kind things for others simply because society says a certain level of gratitude must be expressed in order for it to be worth your time doing it, then you are acting on an agenda for someone else and have subverted your own authenticity in favor of that.


The only one stuck on notions of gratitude is you. I'm absolutely fine with not receiving gratitude for opening/holding a door. It's the current levels of hostility that I take issue with.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
F*ck chivalry. Go out and be a rebel and open a door for a stranger, without expecting anything in return, because you want to show kindness to your fellow human beings.


Ya lost me there. "F*ck chivalry" (aka: being a gentleman with manners), be a rebel and go out and be a gentleman with manners? Seems a bit contradictory.


originally posted by: tigertatzen
When we are kind to other people for no reason other than an unconditional desire to help, we change our own energy to one that is positive and that attracts positive circumstances back to us.


If only that held true universally, but being kind for no reason other than a desire to be helpful also attracts a lot of hostility in our modern societal atmosphere when it comes to the younger crowd.
edit on 10/7/17 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

Woman you had better cover yourself up. I can see your cleavage.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: CulturalResilience

Woman you had better cover yourself up. I can see your cleavage.


You didn't address the topic. Do you like boobs?




posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: intrepid

originally posted by: Deaf Alien
a reply to: CulturalResilience

Woman you had better cover yourself up. I can see your cleavage.


You didn't address the topic. Do you like boobs?


OF FREAKING COURSE!!!




posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

This is just another example of how the media tries to pit us against one another by keeping issues relevant that really should not be issues in the first place. Was it a spontaneous accident that he said that? Of course not...he fully meant to because he knew it would get this precise reaction. And what shocker...it did.

As a woman, it offends me...not because he said "boobs"; it is absurd to get all riled up over someone describing female body parts with a term more fitting for a kindergartener than a grown ass man. It offends me because it was used to engender shock and indignation in women in general and used the reactions of other women to attempt to emotionally manipulate all of us.

There is nothing scandalous about this. And to any woman who buys into it, I say grow the hell up already. We have boobs. Breasts. Tits. Tatas. The Girls. Bazoombas. Fun bags. That's not new.

We go to great lengths to accentuate them. Push-up bras, plunging necklines. Sparkly jewelry. Halter tops and bikinis. We feed our babies with them and boldly whip them out in public to do it. We do marathons and wear T-shirts and accessories to raise awareness about them. And if we have to remove them for medical reasons, we have surgeries to replace them. We put these things out there in the public eye all the time in multitude of different ways. We make sure that everyone knows our breasts are important.

So why get all righteously indignant when some immature guy who feels the need to elucidate his admiration for them with silly baby talk? As a boob having, intelligent adult female, I find that to be patently ludicrous.

Did he touch anyone? Did he say anything derogatory or single out one specific set of knockers to personally humiliate the owner of them? Then how is this offensive?

I would be willing to bet my next paycheck that the same women who are all bent out of shape over this have, at some point, spoken out loud about breasts, in full earshot of complete strangers. And probably not their own breasts, either. What's the difference between that free speech and this?

Not a damned thing. When women's magazines have bold typed cover headlines with references to breasts and other female parts, plastered at every checkout aisle at every grocery store, in full view, isn't that free speech? Women find that to be perfectly acceptable...if they didn't, the magazines would not be put out there like that.

There are so many other real, truly offensive and awful things out there that don't get nearly this much attention. Why is this newsworthy?




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