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Extreme crosswind landing in an A380

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posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

I'm sure Manchester airport has one called the runway visitor park. There are mounds to view from and also a tour of concorde that's there iirc.




posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well that makes sense. I am sure the insurance companies and whoever else would be interested in crash data would like to be able to get footage in an accident or disaster scenario, too.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: Woody510
a reply to: Imagewerx

I'm sure Manchester airport has one called the runway visitor park. There are mounds to view from and also a tour of concorde that's there iirc.


There's a guy with a good Youtube channel with a lot of good videos taken from there
.

Meanwhile while we're talking about Emirates A380s and holes in fences.......




posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: evc1shop

The AvNerd community about lost their collective minds when it was announced that airports were starting to work with and welcome spotters instead of running themn off and giving them as hard time.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 06:41 PM
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I certainly hope there were no pets in the cargo, that's a horrible way for whiskers or fifi to go



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: evc1shop

The AvNerd community about lost their collective minds when it was announced that airports were starting to work with and welcome spotters instead of running themn off and giving them as hard time.


KLVK has an observation tower with AC power for your notebook running ADSB.

When I finally tracked down the Dynamic Aviation "sprayer", I took the photos from the KLVK observation tower.

www.lazygranch.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Little did I know at the time that it sprays sterile flies rather than chemicals.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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Fence surfing




posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger



There was one recently of a Caravan or something about that size where the wheel actually brushed the guy that was filming it.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 08:25 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


I always liked this one



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 08:47 PM
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posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 05:24 PM
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As a pilot myself, I hesitate to cast shade on a fellow pilot, but in this case I think the A380 pilot blew it.

For non-pilots, there are two accepted techniques for crosswind landings. The first is called "crabbing" (because the aircraft is flying partially sideways, similar to the way a crab moves). In that technique, the pilot sets the pitch attitude (nose up) and the throttle to give the correct glide slope and approach airspeed. Additionally, the pilot holds the wings level and uses the rudder to point the aircraft nose off the runway centerline and into the wind (the "crab angle"). By using the rudder only, it's fairly easy to keep the center of mass of the aircraft on the runway centerline and moving in the direction of the runway, but the pilot may have to look out the side window to keep the runway in sight during the approach. The problem is that if you touch down with the fuselage pointed in the direction of the crab angle, the aircraft will immediately jerk and try to run off the runway in that direction. If you overcorrect, it will try to run off in the other direction. This is exactly what the A380 pilot did in this case, as manuelram16 pointed out. So the trick is to neutralize the crab angle by using the rudder at the exact instant the wheels touch the runway. That takes a lot of practice.

The easier technique is called "slipping" to a landing. In that technique, the pilot likewise sets the pitch attitude and the throttle to give the correct glide slope and approach airspeed, but banks into the crosswind while cross controlling with the rudder in order to remain on the runway centerline. In a slipped landing, you maintain the controls steady until just before touchdown, and then slowly and smoothly relax the bank angle and rudder to their neutral positions. Because the fuselage is always pointed in the direction of the runway centerline during a slip landing, there is a much reduced likelihood of the aircraft trying to veer off the runway. Also, the final controls adjustment just before touchdown consists primarily of removing the rudder and aileron angles and allowing them to go back to their trimmed settings; that doesn't require exquisite coordination and huge amounts of practice to get it right--the aircraft naturally wants to do that. (Actually, you want to touch down with just a small amount of bank angle remaining so that the upwind main landing gear touches down immediately before the downwind tire does; with a tricycle landing gear setup that makes the landing smoother.)

So why didn't this pilot execute a slip landing? Because the Airbus operations manual says not to. From what I've been able to find out, the Airbus autopilot doesn't like it when the human pilot tries to fly the aircraft with crossed controls (the ailerons trying to turn right, for example and the rudder turning left)--and a slip landing is definitely a crossed control example. Apparently, Boeing autopilots don't have this characterIstic so 777's, for example, can and do begin a slipped approach to landing when they're within about 400 feet of ground level. My understanding is that the Airbus manual says the pilot should execute a crabbed approach until just before touchdown and then--in quick succession--align the fuselage with the runway using the rudder, bank into the wind by using the ailerons to lower the upwind wing, and then cross control with the rudder to keep the aircraft on the runway centerline. Essentially, you're supposed to execute a crabbed approach to the last few seconds of flight and then immediately enter a slipped approach attitude.

The way it looks to me, this is exactly what the A380 pilot was attempting to do. The problem is that he seemed to have run out of altitude about 1 or 2 seconds before he would have completed the maneuver. He overcorrected the yaw maneuver (actually flying with the crosswind instead of against it) and did not have time to get the fuselage aligned with the runway before the landing gear touched the pavement. Simultaneously, it looks like he was trying to bank slightly right into a slipped approach attitude but didn't get very far with that maneuver either, before the landing gear touched down. It seems to me that this approach puts a heavy cognitive workload on the pilot at exactly the moment of touchdown. If the pilot had begun his transition from crabbed approach to slipped approach even a few seconds earlier, it could have been a much less dramatic landing.

If there are any Airbus pilots here, please let me know if my understanding of their practices and procedures isn't correct.
a reply to: FredT



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