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Trump Rolls Back Obama’s Birth Control Coverage Rule

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posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: luthier

Historically, I've rejected the social contract concept, especially in modern America where it is a conveniently one-sided contract for far too many people. People have a responsibility to themselves and for themselves first and foremost... that needs to be embraced before anyone has the right to expect others to pick up their responsibilities for them.


Cool get out, stop using roads and letting the us protect your trade.




posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth
you are not paying for her choices when insurance is concerned!!! what you are doing is trying to add an extra cost to women if they desire to have their insurance cover insurance while she is still paying for viagra coverage in hers more than likely!!!



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Bullsnip, I pay my taxes for that.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
a reply to: windword

Male cow feces. If the employer told a woman that she couldn't use birth control because it was against the employer's religious beliefs, that would be forcing the employer's religious beliefs on someone. This is just if you want it pay for it yourself.



This is the crux of the issue right here. Nobody's religious beliefs are being forced on anyone. Anyone claiming this is forcing religion on people is a liar.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: luthier

Historically, I've rejected the social contract concept, especially in modern America where it is a conveniently one-sided contract for far too many people. People have a responsibility to themselves and for themselves first and foremost... that needs to be embraced before anyone has the right to expect others to pick up their responsibilities for them.


Indeed, and the social contract only makes sense where an individual is not in control of others choices that may adversely affect them, for example with crime. No one chooses to be mugged, raped, murdered... hence the expectation that we should as a society pay for the police force for protection.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:00 PM
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a reply to: face23785

yes it is.... individual insurance policies is far more than employer based insurance. that's point number one.
many people would not be able to afford individual insurance.

okay, so, if the gov't mandating that employers insurance has to include coverage for birth control is going against the employer's religious rights...
then, having an economic/healthcare system that doesn't give many people any other option than to accept the plan that is offered by the employer also does, since that employer could very well decide that the family plan that they offer to their employees birth control coverage...
gee, it seems the only way we can solve this problems is just remove birth control coverage from all employer based insurance policies, right???

or acknowledging that it's the insurance companies that are responsible for creating these insurance policies and just like the employees are faced with the option of either accepting it or finding another policy that probably costs more, the employers have to accept what the insurance companies offer and make their decision on what is the best business decisions.... and realize what they are buying is the coverage that insurance package offers and not birth control, or any other individual item included in that package.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: dawnstar
a reply to: UKTruth
you are not paying for her choices when insurance is concerned!!! what you are doing is trying to add an extra cost to women if they desire to have their insurance cover insurance while she is still paying for viagra coverage in hers more than likely!!!





The pool of insured pays for her choices. She doesn't want to get pregnant so others pay extra.
It's not even insurance in anything but name. It is a subsidy for her CHOSEN lifestyle. Insurance is a totally different concept, paying a premium for risk of an event/occurrence that you hope will never happen, whilst receiving nothing in return unless that event/occurrence does happen.

This is no different from asking an insurer to provide me with a constant supply of parachutes to pay for my lifestyle choice of base jumping, because I didn't want to pay for them myself - or I wanted to share the cost with others who would never dream of such a risky lifestyle.


edit on 6/10/2017 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:03 PM
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originally posted by: dawnstar
not anymore than women are expected to.

Incorrect.

And take whatever you want off the table. Your body, your choice.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: face23785


When people pay their premiums, they're paying for their contraception, because contraception is covered. What don't you get about that?

Now, some employers can say, get that filthy birth control off the list of options for my employees and their families because it offends my morality, but don't think for a minute it's going to save the employer, or anyone else money. But, it will cost many women and their families.

edit on 6-10-2017 by windword because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth




She doesn't want to get pregnant so others pay extra.


Not as much as they would be paying should she get pregnant.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: dothedew


but, women having to pay for men's Viagra.. i don't get that arguement.

i don't have diabetes, or high blood pressure.. why am i paying for medications like those for other people?? LOTS of people use bc for medical purposes.



also, does you fiancé have insurance? was that the cost after insurance? pretty sure it probably was.. especially if it was 3 months worth!

bc, without insurance, one month can cost up to $50. places like planned parenthood offer bc at a discounted rate, tho... but, isn't that on the chopping block, too.


edit on 6-10-2017 by knoxie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: dawnstar

No it's not. Your freedom has not been abridged. You can still get birth control. No one's religious beliefs have been forced on you. Stop lying. I realize it makes arguing your point more difficult if you can't make # up, but try.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: windword
a reply to: face23785


When people pay their premiums, they're paying for their contraception, because contraception is covered. What don't you get about that?

Now, some employers can say, get that filthy birth control off the list of options for my employees and their families because it offends my morality, but don't think for a minute it's going to save the employer, or anyone else money. But, it will cost many women and their families.


I don't think that at all. I simply said no one's religious beliefs have been forced on anyone as a result of this. Anyone pretending this is the case is a liar. Eye on the ball.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth



There are preventative checkups covered on insurance.

Expecting sex not to happen is not realistic.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: face23785




I don't think that at all.


You emphatically agreed with a poster who did think that.



I simply said no one's religious beliefs have been forced on anyone as a result of this


Not yet. The memo just went out last night. But it will happen. That's a given in this "religious freedom" expansion memo.

No one's forcing birth control on employers. They're forcing insurance companies to make sure it's included in every policy. Now, under the guise religious or moral posturing, employers can block their female employees access to contraception and deny them their legal benefits. So, yeah, that's imposing one's religious and/or moral authority to adversely affect another's life.

Every employer that that takes this option is imposing their moral authority over their employees and their families.


edit on 6-10-2017 by windword because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: knoxie
but, women having to pay for men's Viagra.. i don't get that arguement.

Can anyone provide the section of the ACA that mandates viagra for ED treatments?



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth

here is a list of all the preventive medicine that is mandated by obamacare...





Abdominal aortic aneurysm one-time screening for men of specified ages who have ever smoked
Alcohol misuse screening and counseling
Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease for men and women of certain ages
Blood pressure screening
Cholesterol screening for adults of certain ages or at higher risk
Colorectal cancer screening for adults over 50
Depression screening
Diabetes (Type 2) screening for adults with high blood pressure
Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease
Hepatitis B screeningThis link takes you to a website not operated by the federal government. The site may have different privacy and security policies. for people at high risk, including people from countries with 2% or more Hepatitis B prevalence, and U.S.-born people not vaccinated as infants and with at least one parent born in a region with 8% or more Hepatitis B prevalence.
Hepatitis C screening for adults at increased risk, and one time for everyone born 1945 – 1965
HIV screening for everyone ages 15 to 65, and other ages at increased risk

Immunization vaccines for adults — doses, recommended ages, and recommended populations vary:
Diphtheria
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Herpes Zoster
Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
Influenza (flu shot)
Measles
Meningococcal
Mumps
Pertussis
Pneumococcal
Rubella
Tetanus
Varicella (Chickenpox)
Lung cancer screeningThis link takes you to a website not operated by the federal government. The site may have different privacy and security policies. for adults 55 - 80 at high risk for lung cancer because they’re heavy smokers or have quit in the past 15 years
Obesity screening and counseling
Sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling for adults at higher risk
Syphilis screening for adults at higher risk
Tobacco Use screening for all adults and cessation interventions for tobacco users

www.healthcare.gov...



here's more...





Anemia screening on a routine basis
Breastfeeding comprehensive support and counseling from trained providers, and access to breastfeeding supplies, for pregnant and nursing women
Contraception: Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptive methods, sterilization procedures, and patient education and counseling, as prescribed by a health care provider for women with reproductive capacity (not including abortifacient drugs). This does not apply to health plans sponsored by certain exempt “religious employers.” Learn more about contraceptive coverage.
Folic acid supplements for women who may become pregnant
Gestational diabetes screening for women 24 to 28 weeks pregnant and those at high risk of developing gestational diabetes
Gonorrhea screening for all women at higher risk
Hepatitis B screening for pregnant women at their first prenatal visit
Rh Incompatibility screening for all pregnant women and follow-up testing for women at higher risk
Syphilis screening
Expanded tobacco intervention and counseling for pregnant tobacco users
Urinary tract or other infection screening

www.healthcare.gov...


and there's even more!!!





Alcohol and drug use assessments for adolescents
Autism screening for children at 18 and 24 months
Behavioral assessments for children ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years, 5 to 10 years, 11 to 14 years, 15 to 17 years
Blood pressure screening for children ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years , 5 to 10 years, 11 to 14 years, 15 to 17 years
Cervical dysplasia screening for sexually active females
Depression screening for adolescents
Developmental screening for children under age 3
Dyslipidemia screening for children at higher risk of lipid disorders ages: 1 to 4 years, 5 to 10 years, 11 to 14 years, 15 to 17 years
Fluoride chemoprevention supplements for children without fluoride in their water source
Gonorrhea preventive medication for the eyes of all newborns
Hearing screening for all newborns
Height, weight and body mass index (BMI) measurements for children ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years, 5 to 10 years, 11 to 14 years, 15 to 17 years
Hematocrit or hemoglobin screening for all children
Hemoglobinopathies or sickle cell screening for newborns
Hepatitis B screeningThis link takes you to a website not operated by the federal government. The site may have different privacy and security policies. for adolescents at high risk, including adolescents from countries with 2% or more Hepatitis B prevalence, and U.S.-born adolescents not vaccinated as infants and with at least one parent born in a region with 8% or more Hepatitis B prevalence: 11 – 17 years.
HIV screening for adolescents at higher risk
Hypothyroidism screening for newborns

Immunization vaccines for children from birth to age 18 — doses, recommended ages, and recommended populations vary:
Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
Haemophilus influenza type b
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Human Papillomavirus (PVU)
Inactivated Poliovirus
Influenza (flu shot)
Measles
Meningococcal
Pneumococcal
Rotavirus
Varicella (Chickenpox)

Iron supplements for children ages 6 to 12 months at risk for anemia
Lead screening for children at risk of exposure
Medical history for all children throughout development ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years , 5 to 10 years , 11 to 14 years , 15 to 17 years
Obesity screening and counseling
Oral health risk assessment for young children ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years, 5 to 10 years
Phenylketonuria (PKU) screening for newborns
Sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling and screening for adolescents at higher risk
Tuberculin testing for children at higher risk of tuberculosis ages: 0 to 11 months, 1 to 4 years, 5 to 10 years, 11 to 14 years, 15 to 17 years
Vision screening for all children

www.healthcare.gov...


they are included for their value of prevention, because it's cheaper to provide these than it is to address the problems thay seek to prevent.
my kids are adult, I have no need for insurance on those items that are listed for children. I am not sexually active, I have no need to be covered for any STDs, and, even with insurance, I wouldn't be able to afford any treatments for any cancer that could possibly be found!!! but it is still beneficial to me that children get their immunizations, that people are tested for stds and treated, that the kids can have their vision problems corrected and they are able to learn!!

and by they way, if you jump out of a plane and your chute doesn't open, well, that was a choice you made, a very costly choice if you happen to survive, which will drain that pool of money much faster that a women's birth control costs will!



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:36 PM
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I would gladly pay for birth control and abortions with my taxes.


And speaking of abortions, should we start punishing women who have miscarriages?

Is it cool when her body does it, but not her conscience?

Back before abortions, they just drank tea that made them miscarry.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: peck420

robschwab.com...

that's the best I am gonna do to answer that question.
obamacare mandates that prescription drugs be covered, and, for the most part, the insurance covers at least some of the meds for each medical problem. if the one that your doctor is prescribed isn't included then usually there is one similar enough to it that can be substituted.



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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Birth control used properly is not 100% effective. Heck even tubal ligations fail and vasectomies fail. All the men who do not want to pay for contraception still have to pay taxes for schools and prisons. All these pregnancies involve men and sometimes they do not want kids or more kids. The burden always falls on the woman if she gets pregnant as it is obvious that she had sex. The "father" gets to walk away. Men do not have to take pills every day that affects their hormone levels and if it fails they are not pointed out as a moral failure. Shame shame. Maybe it is $1 a day for BC, but first you need to see a doctor every year, then find a pharmacy every month without fail by a certain time or risk a pregnancy. In some places neither of these are easy.

Two separate basic insurance plans, one for people who do not want anyone to have contraception but has to pay for pregnancy and health care for all children, and a second for people who believe that contraception and pregnancy coverage plus health care for children.

I remember when SAFE legal abortion was fought for. Some people do not realize that there was always abortion even when it was illegal. There will still be abortion even if it is outlawed. Rich women will go abroad, middle class will support another child or find a hopefully safe black market abortion and poor women will die just like they always do from unsafe methods..




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