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About the Vegas Killer... newest info

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posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:08 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Isn't NN one of those "sources" that are considered toilet paper here at ATS?



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: carewemust


At the 5pm briefing on Tuesday, they sounded optimistic when stating that "in 48 hours, we'll have a lot more info for everybody".

Today (Wednesday) at the 5pm briefing, the investigators were frustrated that everyone wants answers that they didn't have.


I have nothing but a grateful heart for the LV police and sheriff right now. From everything I've read and seen, they've done a really great job and are doing a great job, and I'm sure are doing their best. I'll be patient (or try anyway).

It wouldn't surprise me if the media are pressuring them behind the scenes with stupid questions or unreasonable demands and expectations. Perhaps because they really are that stupid and incompetent themselves... or perhaps to muddy the waters for their own biases and agendas... or perhaps something worse. Trump may also be applying his own brand of pressure. And maybe the FBI is making things difficult for them -- pulling rank and otherwise interfering in their investigation, perhaps for more nefarious reasons that turf wars and power plays.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea


It was impressive hearing the top law enforcement guy announce that in just the past 3 days, they've interviewed over 100 people, all over the world. The coordination, speed, and breadth of this investigation seems to be even more urgent than the 911 terrorist investigation was.

This is how Bob Mueller should operate! But that's for another thread.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: seeker1963


Normally a general practitioner would NOT prescribe Valium for a mental condition.


This doctor that prescribed the meds, according to the Las Vegas Review, is an Internist:

General internal medicine physicians, or internists, are primary-care doctors who perform physical exams and treat a wide spectrum of common illnesses in adult men and women. One of every four physicians in the U.S. is an internist, many of whom are certified in one of 19 subspecialties, including cardiology, infectious disease and medical oncology.

Pretty much a GP, yes?


But then again, I guess it depends on the doctor or the MONEY?


There's always that ^^^.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:29 AM
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not a suicide note the sheriff has said.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: Boadicea

It was impressive hearing the top law enforcement guy announce that in just the past 3 days, they've interviewed over 100 people, all over the world. The coordination, speed, and breadth of this investigation seems to be even more urgent than the 911 terrorist investigation was.


Yes, it's all been very impressive. Well, maybe not all. But for the greatest part, I have faith in LV LE.


This is how Bob Mueller should operate! But that's for another thread.


If only, eh?



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: Official story of Las Vegas shooting unravels; physical impossibility of lone gunman senior citizen makes narrative ludicrous

As always take what you will from the article...


Is it true that shooting an automatic rifle for 10 minutes is almost impossible, due to the physical stress? (I've only shot shotguns.)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
not a suicide note the sheriff has said.


Since learning that he videotaped himself, I've been wondering if he videotaped a statement as well. I haven't seen that mentioned or asked though. Just a thought on my part.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:40 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Sheriff said no evidence of him recording himself.

Was for monitoring when anyone approached room... watching briefing.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

I just read the piece in NYT. It's not bad, the quote about video poker being "the crack coc aine of gambling" is just dumb though. Interesting details and worth a read but I'll post a few excerpts:

Las Vegas Gunman Chased Gambling’s Payouts and Perks


Last week, as a reward for his loyalty and gambling, Mr. Paddock stayed free of charge on the 32nd floor in one of the elite suites of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, one of his favorite places to play.


Comped suite. I have no experience with MGM or Mandala Bay but corner suites are always the nicest and largest and there's obviously less of them so they're harder to book.


Just three days before he opened fire from the Mandalay Bay, he was seen playing video poker in its casino.


More about that from the end:


Mr. Paddock was in the high-limit room at Mandalay Bay last Thursday night, playing a machine that allowed him to bet $100 with each deal of the virtual cards. Nearby, another customer hit a big hand and rose excitedly from his chair. He recalled how his enthusiasm caused Mr. Paddock to pause and turn.

“What’d you hit?” Mr. Paddock asked.

“A royal flush,” the man said.

“Good job,” Mr. Paddock replied. And he went back to playing.


He had credit lines at casinos apparently. This is actually something I know nothing about.


According to a person who has reviewed Mr. Paddock’s gambling history, and who requested anonymity because the information was part of an active police investigation, dozens of “currency transaction reports,” which casinos must send the federal government for transactions greater than $10,000, were filed in Mr. Paddock’s name. Mr. Paddock had six-figure credit lines at casinos that afforded him the chance to make big sums in long sit-down sessions, and he was known as someone who always paid his accounts. His rooms were often comped, meaning given to him free, including this past weekend at Mandalay Bay, according to the person familiar with his history.


He made not one but two complaints about noise coming from the room below, the night before:


He was there to play, not to party. The night before the shooting, Mr. Paddock made two complaints to the hotel about noise coming from his downstairs neighbors: Albert Garzon, a restaurant owner visiting from San Diego, and his wife and friends. Mr. Garzon, who was staying in 31-135, directly beneath Mr. Paddock, said security guards knocked on his door around 1:30 a.m. on Sunday and asked him to turn down his music, country songs. When he asked where the complaint was coming from, pointing out that the nearest rooms on either side were far away, the security guard said, “It’s the guest above you.”

They turned the music down, but had another visit from different security guards half an hour later. The man had called to complain again. Mr. Garzon turned the music off. It wasn’t until the early hours of Monday that Mr. Garzon realized Mr. Paddock had been the complainer.


A bit about his playing and Mandalay Bay:


“He was a math guy,” Eric Paddock, his youngest brother, said. “He could tell you off the top of his head what the odds were down to a tenth of a percent on whatever machine he was playing. He studied it like it was a Ph.D. thing. It was not silly gambling. It was work.”

For experts like Mr. Paddock, who had played the game for 25 years, his brother said, each hand required only a few seconds of time.

The top machines at Mandalay Bay pay out 99.17 percent, or $99.17 for every $100 wagered, according to Mr. Curtis. If Mr. Paddock did wind up a net loser, those losses could be offset, in part, by comps, or “kickback rewards,” essentially free money casinos give loyal customers to gamble with. The more that players play, the more they earn in comps. And casinos offer an ever-changing menu of promotions that can cut the expected losses a fraction further.

“If you get close to 100 percent — that’s where he gambled,” Eric Paddock said. “It’s not just the machine. It’s the comps, it’s the room. It’s the 50-year-old port that costs $500 a glass. You add all that stuff together and his net is better than 100 percent.”


He was a top tier at Wynn though I don't *think* it's called Chairman's Club there. Wynn is its own thing with I believe 5 or 6 casino resorts.


He was better known around a few high-limit rooms of the Las Vegas Strip, including at Mandalay Bay and the Wynn Las Vegas. In May, Mr. Paddock invited his brother Eric and his nephew, who is in his 20s, to a weekend at Wynn, where he had achieved “Chairman’s Club” status, his brother said. They feasted on expensive sushi and saw a show. Mr. Paddock said his brother had seen it so many times that he noticed that one of the performers was an alternate.


Mandalay Bay is one of ten MGM casino resorts in Vegas if I'm not mistaken. Others include the Bellagio, the Luxor, Circus Circus (which is an odd place but in a good way), and New York New York.

It also mentions something that would strike a cord with most casino regulars. According to the one host interviewed, he was one of those people who sits and watches people, waiting for them to get up from a machine so they can plop down. He's actually referred to as "a starer" which and there's a bit more hearsay about another player complaining to the host that he was "creepy."

It's sounding like maybe he didn't have a lot of casino friends at all. It's interesting that he would bother pouncing on machines like that. Ever hand/spin has the exact same chance of hitting as the last on the same machine. It's just math. But I will say, and I'm going to stereotype the # out of people here, the people who do that tend to be solitary assholes.

From the picture that is coming together for me, the primary focus of this guy's life was being a video poker grinder. He was probably in some casino or another most every single day for hours and hours. Basically 25 years spent playing a small set of not very complicated games, trying to beat the house. I mean, there's only so many video poker games and most of them are variants of one of a couple types.

Imagine your life, for maybe 25 years, centered around "playing" a strictly procedural "game." It's not like playing live poker where there's psychology and competition between people. If he played tight to a strategy, it's like being a human bot. A hand of 5 cards is dealt (or many hands if you play multi-hand). You pick the cards to hold and then press "draw" and you either win or you lose. It's possible to know the absolute best way of playing every combination of 5 cards dealt. You can do it on autopilot (believe me).

When you want to eat, you don't leave, you go to a restaurant or the player's club. When your done, you go to your room, watch a movie and order some room service. Or maybe you take in a show. You can spend days, weeks even never leaving the casino.

I'm just having a hard time imagining any sort of political or religious motivation. People with that sort of obsession don't typically have enough left over to possess the sort of extremism in either to lead to mass murder. And it would seem to me that he would be living in that bubble.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

OMG..you just uncovered the MOTIVE! Paddock HATED COUNTRY MUSIC with a passion. He probably picked up a brochure in one of his prior visits to Vegas that was an advertisement for the Country Music concert. He then decided to make plans to go there and murder as many country music lovers as possible.

Maybe one of his X-wives drove him crazy by playing Conway Twitty songs all the time, or something.


edit on 10/5/2017 by carewemust because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:53 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian


He made not one but two complaints about noise coming from the room below, the night before:


He was there to play, not to party. The night before the shooting, Mr. Paddock made two complaints to the hotel about noise coming from his downstairs neighbors: Albert Garzon, a restaurant owner visiting from San Diego, and his wife and friends. Mr. Garzon, who was staying in 31-135, directly beneath Mr. Paddock, said security guards knocked on his door around 1:30 a.m. on Sunday and asked him to turn down his music, country songs. When he asked where the complaint was coming from, pointing out that the nearest rooms on either side were far away, the security guard said, “It’s the guest above you.”

They turned the music down, but had another visit from different security guards half an hour later. The man had called to complain again. Mr. Garzon turned the music off. It wasn’t until the early hours of Monday that Mr. Garzon realized Mr. Paddock had been the complainer.


.


I couldn't help but notice that he complained twice in the middle of the night about the guest in the room below him, who was playing COUNTRY music. Then I start wondering if maybe the next night, when that loud country music was going on in the parking lot across from his room, he just snapped.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 12:56 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian




According to the one host interviewed, he was one of those people who sits and watches people, waiting for them to get up from a machine so they can plop down. He's actually referred to as "a starer" which and there's a bit more hearsay about another player complaining to the host that he was "creepy."


I had a very brief gambling phase. The watchers are compulsive gamblers who mentally count how many plays someone has versus how often the machine pays out. They haunt bars and casinos and hover near the machines waiting for them to be primed to pay. I'm not sure about every play having an equal chance of paying out. Myth or otherwise, the compulsive gamblers think they pay out according to how many plays there have been and how much cash is in its belly.

I've only got anecdotal evidence. I worked in bars in Liverpool and we'd ask the 'watchers' to leave. They'd rarely buy a drink and were taking money from the machines and out of the bar whereas customers would pay the money back to the bar or the machine. I also have a mate who had a problem with gambling; he'd hang around and 'identify' the ones waiting to pay out.

It's a human nature thing where belief dictates behaviour. I reckon most gamblers believe machines and roulette wheels will pay out after a vague period of time or plays. It's nuts in reality!



a reply to: Dudemo5

People keep looking for political reasons so they can trash talk the 'other side.' The most unpopular explanation so far has been 'man loses # for no good reason.' Country music, eggs overcooked, fat man got the last nacho? People who go crazy make crazy decisions.
edit on 10.5.2017 by Kandinsky because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:02 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian




It's interesting that he would bother pouncing on machines like that. Ever hand/spin has the exact same chance of hitting as the last on the same machine. It's just math. But I will say, and I'm going to stereotype the # out of people here, the people who do that tend to be solitary assholes.


Some people that do that are just waiting on that particular machine. And him being such an avid gambler he probably had only 3 or 4 machines in a casino that he would play.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: theantediluvian




According to the one host interviewed, he was one of those people who sits and watches people, waiting for them to get up from a machine so they can plop down. He's actually referred to as "a starer" which and there's a bit more hearsay about another player complaining to the host that he was "creepy."


I had a very brief gambling phase. The watchers are compulsive gamblers who mentally count how many plays someone has versus how often the machine pays out. They haunt bars and casinos and hover near the machines waiting for them to be primed to pay. I'm not sure about every play having an equal chance of paying out. Myth or otherwise, the compulsive gamblers think they pay out according to how many plays there have been and how much cash is in its belly.

I've only got anecdotal evidence. I worked in bars in Liverpool and we'd ask the 'watchers' to leave. They'd rarely buy a drink and were taking money from the machines and out of the bar whereas customers would pay the money back to the bar or the machine. I also have a mate who had a problem with gambling; he'd hang around and 'identify' the ones waiting to pay out.

It's a human nature thing where belief dictates behaviour. I reckon most gamblers believe machines and roulette wheels will pay out after a vague period of time or plays. It's nuts in reality!



a reply to: Dudemo5

People keep looking for political reasons so they can trash talk the 'other side.' The most unpopular explanation so far has been 'man loses # for no good reason.' Country music, eggs overcooked, fat man got the last nacho? People who go crazy make crazy decisions.


I love to gamble, have a bit of a slots problem. I mostly gamble online now but when I was at the casino every night I had my favorite macjines that I wanted to play. They could have 10 of the exact same slot but 1 has paid me 5 times so thats the one I play lol



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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I guess I am too impatient
edit on 5-10-2017 by notsure1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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oops double post
edit on 5-10-2017 by notsure1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:13 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: theantediluvian

OMG..you just uncovered the MOTIVE! Paddock HATED COUNTRY MUSIC with a passion. He probably picked up a brochure in one of his prior visits to Vegas that was an advertisement for the Country Music concert. He then decided to make plans to go there and murder as many country music lovers as possible.

Maybe one of his X-wives drove him crazy by playing Conway Twitty songs all the time, or something.



If you're not being sarcastic, I mentioned that possibility 2 days ago. It was your OP actually!

www.abovetopsecret.com...

I was just putting it out there.

edit on E31America/ChicagoThu, 05 Oct 2017 01:17:33 -050010amThursdayth01am by EternalShadow because: add



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: Dudemo5

Here I shared earlier that it was said he liked Country Music.

'I know he liked country music so then I'm thinking he must have been after someone he knows, that was my first thought.
Gunshop worker
Maybe the song by Jason Aldean, when he started shooting set him off-further because it was already planned, maybe it was his and Marilou's song(lyrics mentioned anger in the song might be what people were claiming of him).

Would be interesting to know which song/s were playing from the other hotel patron.

IMO I don't believe the motive was music but rather opportune time and place for what ever his motive was.
www.abovetopsecret.com...







 
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