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10 Countries With More Firearm-Related Deaths Than The U.S.A.

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posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:15 PM
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the few things in common between low crime rate countries is that most of them are old nations, their people put heavy trust in government, they are heavily urbanized, they have mostly unified cultures, they have strict immigration policy, they have highly centralized police and government structures, their military can act within their own borders.

there is probably more but america has none of these traits...




posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country


Well almost all violent crime, including those without guns is way lower in Japan.

The most obvious answer seems to be there is very little diversity in Japan.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:21 PM
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Talking about 'common sense' gun control is like talking about 'common sense' abortion control. No one is going to be willing to negotiate their rights away on either of these issues.

My biggest problem is right wingers and left wingers both want to take away our freedoms and we are freaking helping them because partisan politics.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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Great, so you're better statistically than 3rd world countries(most of those listed are not 1st world anyway)..doesn't really say much IMO
That's all I'm going say about it..have your guns, not my place to tell you how to live.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

I have no particular axe to grind here - gun control is a very complex subject with regards to the USA......but you really want to compare the USA with those countries?

You put the USA in the same category as Swaziland and Colombia etc?

Sorry, it lends no credence or credibility to any point you may be trying to make.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus



I will never be giving up my firearms or my second amendment rights.


And that's your right as it stands....but that's one of the beauties I've become to understand about the US Constitution, it's fluid and recognises that it's not perfect and needs updating, that's why there are so many Amendments.



This discussion is moot as far as I am concerned.


So, in The Land of the Free it's 'moot' to even have the discussion about updating / altering things?

Why can't you have a nationwide discussion on the pro's and con's of current legislation?
Surely that's at the very essence of any 'free' country?



I will die before I surrender my firearms.


You may very well.....just like thousands of other American citizens have done.....but hey, that's your call.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:54 PM
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originally posted by: Freeborn
So, in The Land of the Free it's 'moot' to even have the discussion about updating / altering things?

Why can't you have a nationwide discussion on the pro's and con's of current legislation?
Surely that's at the very essence of any 'free' country?


We have that 'discussion' every time that something like this happens. Some may not want to accept it, but the reality is that the people in a majority of states and Congressional districts have made their decision and do not want a round of major gun control legislation that encroaches on the rights of law-abiding gun owners. They've proven it repeatedly in the voting booth, including last year just a few short months after Orlando. The Dems seem to have finally realized it, too, because even they are backing away a bit from a major gun control push right now for fear that it could cost them the 2018 midterms, particularly when they have several vulnerable Senators in red states that Trump won last fall.
edit on 4-10-2017 by vor78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: vor78

I've got to say that from the outside looking in it seems as if many, many Americans are completely unwilling to have any sort of reasonable, informed national debate solely on the pro's and con's of current gun control legislation across the USA.
Statements like 'this discussion is moot' is clear evidence of this.

I recognise that the issue of gun control in the USA is rather unique and anyone with even the slightest understanding of the subject will recognise that the Right to Bear Arms is engrained in the American psyche. But surely even the most ardent supporter must see that things aren't perfect, not by a long shot, and there has to be changes.

What those changes are only Americans can decide....but they'll never be able to decide if the discussion isn't even allowed to occur in the first place.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:16 PM
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originally posted by: EternalShadow
Are those countries populations as medicated as the US population per capita?

America is a HIGHLY medicated nation!

Now either the psychiatric community has got it right, or they are wrong, purposely, and complicit in pushing pharmaceutical dope on everybody.

Or there is something terribly wrong with the culture, lifestyle, beliefs and habits of everyday people in the United States that may contribute to the occasional person absolutely losing it.

Either way, the proof is in the list of side effects for most of these drugs that are being overly prescribed.

I think that needs be researched....and I'm taking about what the person has been prescribed over their lifetime, not a year ago or couple months ago.

Yeah..yeah...yeah, correlation is not causation..

Whatever.

Look into it anyways.


I could definitely see this being a factor. They do tell patients when they are prescribed certain medications not to stop taking them suddenly because it can make you suicidal/homicidal. When it's time to get you off of them they write you new scripts with progressively lower doses to ween you off of them. Some of these drugs are designed to alter your brain chemistry, so just making your body quit off of them cold turkey can do unpredictable things to your brain, and by extension your thinking.

I have had such an experience. I was on a mild anti-anxiety medication and didn't like the way it was making me feel so I stopped taking it one day, having forgotten the doctor specifically told me not to do that. A few days later I remembered and realized that was probably why I had been thinking about killing myself and sometimes people I worked with for no apparent reason. I wasn't depressed about anything and when I am going through tough times I'm not usually the type that even thinks about suicide. I can only explain it as a side effect of quitting the drug that luckily went away after a few days or a week, I forget exactly how long.

I can totally see people that are on stronger doses of whatever that was or stronger such medicines could have adverse reactions to starting or stopping it that make them do crazy things.

We've all seen the ads on tv for some of these meds. They will literally advertise an anti-depressant and one of the side effects is depression and suicidal thoughts. Everyone's body is different, doctors and drug companies are basically just playing percentages when they prescribe you something like that.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:20 PM
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originally posted by: Freeborn
a reply to: vor78

I've got to say that from the outside looking in it seems as if many, many Americans are completely unwilling to have any sort of reasonable, informed national debate solely on the pro's and con's of current gun control legislation across the USA.
Statements like 'this discussion is moot' is clear evidence of this.

I recognise that the issue of gun control in the USA is rather unique and anyone with even the slightest understanding of the subject will recognise that the Right to Bear Arms is engrained in the American psyche. But surely even the most ardent supporter must see that things aren't perfect, not by a long shot, and there has to be changes.

What those changes are only Americans can decide....but they'll never be able to decide if the discussion isn't even allowed to occur in the first place.



As a pro-gun American, I can tell you I and many gun owners I know are open to such a discussion and would even entertain some restrictions. However, the extremists on the other side make it hard to compromise on anything. As soon as you give an inch and agree to one measure, they immediately start pushing for the next. It's an easy path towards not actually banning guns but making so many laws that it makes it next to impossible for many people to get them. They've already effectively priced poor people, who live in the most dangerous neighborhoods, completely out of the ability to own a gun to defend themselves. Many of them can't even afford the application fee.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: Freeborn

It may seem that way from the outside, but you have to understand that this conversation has been ongoing for years in the US. Everyone has heard it all before and both sides are firmly entrenched in their positions at this point. And that's before you even consider that this is one of the two major lightning rods of social issue politics in the US (the other being abortion).

The only thing that might come of this would be a restriction or outright ban on the sale of bump-fire stocks. That's something that's going to be new to the public and there may be an opportunity for something to happen there. Myself, I'm not a supporter of any major gun control legislation, but I do support that, on the basis that those serve no purpose except to intentionally circumvent the existing restrictions on fully automatic weapons.

A major bill, such as an 'assault rifle ban'? Almost certainly not going to happen. The GOP would lose a huge portion of their base if they did, and the Dems will lose key Senate races if they do.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

Can't compare the US to third world countries - apples and oranges dude.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:52 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country

Japan has a culture all its own . The low violence rate is due to that most honorable culture for the most part
How can the US (or any other country) become more like Japan ?
1) Develop a culture based on an intense code of honor
2) Develop a culture based on morality and every single life matters.

Impossible , isn't it ?


You'd be on to something but for the weird porn..



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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originally posted by: Grambler

originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country


Well almost all violent crime, including those without guns is way lower in Japan.

The most obvious answer seems to be there is very little diversity in Japan.



what about the countries with little diversity and still have higher crime rates with a firearm than the US?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: Freeborn

I wasn't trying to make any point, per se. If any, it was precisely that gun control is an extra-complex issue in the U.S.

I was curious to see how extreme the stats got in this area. Many folks on my Facebook feed immediately posted all the 'guns are bad. period.' memes, and I knew that the U.S. didn't have the worst stats in this area, so I checked it out, and figured I'd post a thread about it. I must say I've enjoyed reading the responses. I hope the OP wasn't too baity or anything.

I wasn't so much comparing the U.S. to these countries overall. The only things I can think of in common with some of them in terms of crime is the presence of organized crime; gangs, major drug trade/cartels etc.

Don't throw too many tomatoes at me, but I'm from Canada haha. I wanted to read some of the issues about gun control that make it so complex, because I know I don't really understand it. I'm from Labrador, it's in the middle of nowhere, in a dense forest, so hunting and guns are definitely a part of my growing up. Guns weren't ingrained into our culture to quite the same degree, but I know that they are into yours, and that is a major factor.

Sorry for the winded reply, just wanted to explain the reason for the thread haha. Thanks for responding.
edit on 10/4/2017 by WizardVanWizard because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:19 AM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: SaturnFX

Japan and the US are apples and oranges.

The culture and sociology of the two are vastly different.

Yep, time to bridge that gap then and be more like them



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 05:56 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn

I think most of us are very willing to have that discussion, but the end result usually ends up with everyone realizing that those who would kill others pre-planned, would do so no matter what. So it always turns around to the shooter, and not the weapon. The US has some issues that go beyond the gun. To have someone who devalues human life to the point of taking another life, is the crux of the issue. They would use a hammer, or an axe, or a shovel. And if they were dead set on using a gun, even if they were illegal, (as drugs are) we all know the criminals can find them regardless.

It has to do with looking at the unpleasant truth that Human Nature is flawed. The gun is no more at fault than the flower in this case, it's just a tool used to complete a task. It cannot do a damn thing by itself. But put in the hands of a crazy person, it's as dangerous as a sharp knife. Knowing that we cannot rid the world of guns, it seems the only logical position would be to try to fix the crazy issue. Yet, we in the US are infants when it comes to dealing with mental health.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 05:59 AM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: SaturnFX

Japan and the US are apples and oranges.

The culture and sociology of the two are vastly different.

Yep, time to bridge that gap then and be more like them

If you look at the culture in Japan, everyone is polite, theft isn't an issue, the entire culture is based on that kind of mentality. It would be amazing if the US could mimic that. But think realistically for a second, do you see that as an option?



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 06:29 AM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

All you are telling us is that the US isn't the 10th or worst country with firearm deaths. There are 247 countries in the world though. I think that you should shoot for a higher goal than "not tenth worst". Just saying.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 09:28 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country

Japan has a culture all its own . The low violence rate is due to that most honorable culture for the most part
How can the US (or any other country) become more like Japan ?
1) Develop a culture based on an intense code of honor
2) Develop a culture based on morality and every single life matters.

Impossible , isn't it ?



They are also very homogeneous.

Not a whole lot of that exalted diversity and safe spaces.

The USA has more safe spaces than any other country.








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