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10 Countries With More Firearm-Related Deaths Than The U.S.A.

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posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:30 PM
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Hello everybody. I couldn't find another thread with this title (I'll admit, I didn't look very hard), and mods feel free to move this to a more appropriate forum if needed.

Post-Las-Vegas, I've been reading the usual arguments back and forth about guns and gun control. I wondered what countries have similar or greater amounts of gun-related deaths to/than the United States. I compiled this list from a wiki search. (I know, I know).

The amount of firearm-related deaths (Homicides, suicides, unintentional, and undetermined) per 100k residents in the U.S. was 10.54 (2014), while the amount of guns per 100 residents was 112.6.

Here are 10 countries with higher deaths per 100k, and much lower guns per 100.

Brazil -- 21.2/100k, 8/100

Columbia -- 25.94/100k, 5.9/100

El Salvador--45.6/100k, 5.8/100

Guatemala -- 34.1/100k, 13.1/100

Honduras -- 67.18/100k, 6.2/100

Jamaica -- 30.72/100k, 8.1/100

Panama -- 15.11/100k, 21.7/100

Swaziland -- 37.16/100k, 6.4/100

Uruguay -- 11.52/100k, 31.8/100

Venezuela -- 59.13/100k, 10.7/100

Source - Wikipedia

Also a quick look at gunpolicy.org tells me that these countries seem to have gun laws that are as strict or more strict than the U.S.

I realize this is not a whole or wholly accurate statistical representation of the topic, but, nutshelled, I think it's interesting.

Personally, I don't think that tragedies like the Vegas massacre would be prevented by changing gun laws. Disregarding any Sleeper Agent type conspiracy angles, this seemed like a pre-meditated act, and this fellow would have found a way to pull off what he wanted to, even if he had to go about it in a different way than he did.

What does the U.S. have in common with these countries? Does it matter? I'm just interested to hear some thoughts on this info!

Hopefully it doesn't get too hairy (If anyone replies haha)

Thanks, folks!




posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

We should go further than just "gun deaths" and include deaths by violence.

Every time there is an event like Las Vegas, people go nuts claiming USA is just so violent and it is all because we are a gun owning country, and look at all these mass casualty events relating to a psychotic with a gun, the USA is just such a violent and unsafe place to live.

What's not included in these rants against gun ownership is the relative safety of the USA against other countries with perhaps less guns, but other types of violent deaths!

In 2016, the USA wasn't even in the top 100 of all countries by violent deaths.

Source



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:47 PM
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Are those countries populations as medicated as the US population per capita?

America is a HIGHLY medicated nation!

Now either the psychiatric community has got it right, or they are wrong, purposely, and complicit in pushing pharmaceutical dope on everybody.

Or there is something terribly wrong with the culture, lifestyle, beliefs and habits of everyday people in the United States that may contribute to the occasional person absolutely losing it.

Either way, the proof is in the list of side effects for most of these drugs that are being overly prescribed.

I think that needs be researched....and I'm taking about what the person has been prescribed over their lifetime, not a year ago or couple months ago.

Yeah..yeah...yeah, correlation is not causation..

Whatever.

Look into it anyways.

edit on E31America/ChicagoWed, 04 Oct 2017 19:00:42 -050010pmWednesdayth07pm by EternalShadow because: add/correction



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:48 PM
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originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:51 PM
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Just being a little above these failed states is no big thing. I would not feel too good about just being a little better than these countries…

These very poor countries may at least have a reason for their massive violence: their all ex Spanish, English or maybe French colonies, and have a culture of deep poverty and disease and division based on their recent colonial experience

What’s Americas excuse for all this vicious violence? The supposed greatest country the world has ever seen.

What's their excuse for being so barbaric, yet claiming to be such a great and civilized place where all you hear is the boast “America is the greatest country in the world” all the time while our children are shot down in our schools and on our streets and we cant do anything about it. Innocent people are savagely murdered on a scale unlike anything in the world

What’s so great about that?

Sure America is the wealthiest country, by far, in the world, but when it comes to offering a peaceful healthy environment and having a civilized, decent moral and high culture, America is near the bottom


edit on 4-10-2017 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

Is this a good comparative list to be on? It doesn't seem like a good group to be comparable to.

I haven't been to any of them though, they might be all paradisiacal apart from all the gun crime.

Who knows?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:54 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow

I definitely agree that the U.S. ( and Canada ) are over-medicated. Yet mental health seems to be worse.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

Japan and the US are apples and oranges.

The culture and sociology of the two are vastly different.

The US will have to take a completely custom approach to this as we are a very unique country. We have a high population and large area.

Further more, states will need to curtail as different states are far different from one another.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
a reply to: EternalShadow

I definitely agree that the U.S. ( and Canada ) are over-medicated. Yet mental health seems to be worse.


Well you start screwing with people's noodles by increasing/decreasing their mental state and statistically someone is going to snap.

Especially prescriptions given to the underdeveloped minds of children. Get em while their young I guess.

edit on E31America/ChicagoWed, 04 Oct 2017 18:02:17 -050010pmWednesdayth06pm by EternalShadow because: correction



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

Well...Japan does have the highest suicide rate....just saying



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard



What does the U.S. have in common with these countries? Does it matter?

Other than Swaziland, they're all in the Americas. Americans sure love handling our problems with guns, don't we?


That is what you were referring to, right?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow

I completely agree. Between pharmaceuticals and constant external stimulus, it's the perfect "someone's gonna snap" soup.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country


About two-thirds of the 33,599 'gun deaths' will be suicides. I would point out that Japan has a MUCH higher overall suicide rate than the US.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Haha I noticed that, but I don't think the hemisphere has much to do with it



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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How about compare us to other first world countries?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:39 PM
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originally posted by: EternalShadow
Well you start screwing with people's noodles by increasing/decreasing their mental state and statistically someone is going to snap.

Especially prescriptions given to the underdeveloped minds of children. Get em while their young I guess.


That, and there's the sociodynamic of humans beings in an industrial society, something which seems to go completely unacknowledged. Its not natural any of it, especially the fact this this whole idea of populations bombarded with cradle to grave TV induced impulsiveness mindsets... this stuff is less than 100 years int he making, this grand experiment in which we're in uncharted territory as a species.

It's not that its gone undetected, but its certainly going unacknowledged.

We're all under perpetual Future Shock whether we know it or not. I'm starting to believe that Future Shock in conjunction with the Propaganda Model the corporatacracy bombards us all with, explains this obscene levels of drug addiction culture (both 'illicit' and pharmie drugs mind you).

Quite frankly, that these murder events aren't far more commonplace is breath taking. Especially considering that the media wields manipulative coverage techniques which ensures enhanced Mass Shooter Contagion Effect, as well as the bling bling culture they prey upon our poorest populations with (which bling bling status can only ever be achieved via a life of crime for the overwhelming majority of them).


Here’s What We Know About The Contagion Effect Of Mass Shootings
In the aftermath of yet another mass shooting in the U.S. — the 351st in the 336 days so far this year — a visibly weary President Barack Obama addressed the nation yet again.

“We have a pattern now of mass shootings in this country that has no parallel anywhere else in the world,” he said.

This tragic, uniquely American pattern has led to cycle in which each horrific event begets more violence.

These events don’t occur in a vacuum. While the “contagion” effect is well-documented in the case of suicides, it’s been studied less in the context of mass shootings. But as shootings become an ever more commonplace occurrence, more of us are wondering about the possibility of a ripple effect.

We’re starting to better understand the epidemiology behind this tragic trend. While the research is limited, a recent Arizona State University study found strong evidence that school shootings and other acts of mass violence are contagious.

The researchers did a statistical analysis of 176 mass shooting events in the U.S. from 2006 to 2011 and 220 school shootings between 1997 and 2013. They discovered that mass shootings were significantly more likely to occur if another shooting that received national media coverage took place in the previous 13 days — a finding that suggests that mass shootings tend to cluster together in a similar manner to suicides. This was “apparently due to the [media] coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts,” the study said.


edit on 4-10-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: WizardVanWizard
What does the U.S. have in common with these countries?


Hmm

Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US.

I think the better question is, how can the US have more in common with that country

Japan has a culture all its own . The low violence rate is due to that most honorable culture for the most part
How can the US (or any other country) become more like Japan ?
1) Develop a culture based on an intense code of honor
2) Develop a culture based on morality and every single life matters.

Impossible , isn't it ?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow




Are those countries populations as medicated as the US population per capita?

Self-medicated ?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

I think in a sense hemispheres do count regarding guns, at least as far as all 3 parts of the Americas were the actual frontier not 100 to 200 years ago.

There massive and great swathes of land remained remote well into the the 20th century. I believe the advancements in gun tech as well as industrialization coinciding with the young adult stages of growth these nations were at...created a unique "need" and use of firearms. Heck firearms were an essential in the founding of this nation...just ask Fort Ticonderoga.

The other parts of the globe had ancient societies, already steeped in traditions and population centers mostly long standing over centuries. Their needs were considerably less from the Frontier perspective.

Well that's my theory

edit on 4-10-2017 by BlueJacket because: Sp

edit on 4-10-2017 by BlueJacket because: Sbeesh auto

edit on 4-10-2017 by BlueJacket because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: WizardVanWizard

I will never be giving up my firearms or my second amendment rights.

This discussion is moot as far as I am concerned.

I will die before I surrender my firearms.



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