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Nikola Tesla - Free Energy

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posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 11:38 PM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: surfer_soul

Why would Tesla think he could transfer electricity through the ground? The idea is laughable to even an apprentice Electrical Engineer. He thought he could transfer it wireless through the air, through emitting and receiving towers...

At one time you talk about "transfer electricity through the ground" then later "He thought he could transfer it wireless through the air". These are two separate thing don't you know? My answer was specifically about "transfer electricity through the ground" and I never implied it to be in a wireless way, as ground by itself act as a charge conductor.

Never heard of VLF surface wave propagation? If you consider earth as one surface of a waveguide, don't you think the motion of charge induced into soil qualify as a transfert of electricity? It all depend on definition. What is the definition of tranfert of electricity? Do we need to "transport" the same exact electron from the entrance of a wire to the exit? Seem we are falling into empty rhetoric don't you think?

Here is one extract from 'Basic of Radio Wave Propagation' by I. Rosu VA3IUL Link


A surface wave travels along the surface of the earth by virtue of inducing currents in the earth. The imperfectly conducting earth leads to some of its characteristics. Its range depends upon: Frequency, Polarization, Location and Ground Conductivity.

The surface waves dies more quickly as the frequency increases.


And there is also an interesting paper from Wheeler, H. A. 'Radio-Wave Propagation in the Earth's Crust'.

Don't you think that using earth as one conductor in HVDC lines produce a "transfer electricity through the ground"? A lightning bolt is electricity, when it hit the earth, don't you think there is a "transfer electricity through the ground"? It must go somewhere or do you think it stay at impact point in a concentrated form?

ETA: By re-reading, I find my tone a little harsch, so don't take it as an attack.


Electricity can travel through the ground problem is resistance is very high. Meaning you waist most of your energy. Higher the frequency the worse the resistance . You also seem to not understand science. You got it completely backwards lightening travels from the ground to the clouds. Ground is a negative and clouds are positive. Putting electricity in the ground would just lead to more lightening strikes and have a very negative effect on trees. In fact photosynthesis would stop.

I suggest learning how electricity works from a science perspective and youll see why Tesla was clueless. He was not a scientists he didnt understand why things did what they did. He experimented and found but when he does this he got this reaction. Turns out most things he was given credit for was all ready done in europe. What he was good at is getting patents before scientists got their in. And improving their results. He was an inventor not a scientist.




posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr


You also seem to not understand science. You got it completely backwards lightening travels from the ground to the clouds.

LOLLLLL, another one with the now famous: "You seem to not understand science".

Since, YOU, have a clear undertanding of the "science", do you think electricity is due to electron moving in one direction, or HOLES created from them moving in opposite direction?



posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Tesla was a genius at self promotion.and made things up to seem like he understood science. And the press ate it up because they thought a scientist was willing to explain things they didnt understand.unfortunately real scientist read his comments and laughed. He constantly contradicted known facts. In the end this is why he ends up penniless as investors figured out he was clueless. He could have made a fortune just doing what he did best finding a better way to build something. But his ego didnt allow that he wanted to be a scientist.



posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 11:54 PM
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a reply to: Phage


The Hertz wave theory of wireless transmission may be kept up for a while, but I do not hesitate to say that in a short time it will be recognized as one of the most remarkable and inexplicable aberrations of the scientific mind which has ever been recorded in history.

So?

At the time, the understanding of EM propagation were still debated, and I don't doubt there was other explanation and theory floating around. Tesla had right to his opignons, like you have. And as I said previously, Tesla was not a scientist IMO. He viewed the earth as a sea of charges and was not totally wrong.



posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: Cofactor
I agree. Tesla was not a scientist. But he was a very good engineer.

Do you think his notions about electromagnetic radiation were valid? Do you think that transmitting electricity through the ground is a workable concept?




edit on 10/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: Phage


Do you think his notions about electromagnetic radiation were valid?

Will not answer this one because I can tell with absolute certainty that nobody know EXACTLY what is the true nature of EM propagation in vacuum. You can cite Maxwell, Hertz, Faraday... All we have is strictly mathematical abstraction. Maxwell's equation basically establish the orthogonality relationship between E and H varying field producing a Poynting vector.

And what is the use at such exercise? Me right, you wrong. As I said before, Tesla was not a scientist, and even if it were one, what do you think about Einstein most important mistake about cosmological constant, then expressing that saying that it was his most imortant mistake was now his most imortant mistake. Seem Tesla was not alone at not being all the time right.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: Cofactor

Do you think that Tesla's notions of the transmission of electricity through the ground were valid? Were they practical?
It's a simple question.

edit on 10/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: Phage


Do you think that transmitting electricity through the ground is a workable concept?

Do some research on HVDC, google is your friend.

And since I have spoken of it before, my trolling detector is acting virulently...



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: Cofactor

All I requested is a binary response.

As an engineer, I would think you could provide one.
Do you think that transmitting electricity through the ground is a workable concept?
edit on 10/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: dragonridr


You also seem to not understand science. You got it completely backwards lightening travels from the ground to the clouds.

LOLLLLL, another one with the now famous: "You seem to not understand science".

Since, YOU, have a clear undertanding of the "science", do you think electricity is due to electron moving in one direction, or HOLES created from them moving in opposite direction?


Electricity is caused by the empty space between charged objects. The space surrounding a charged object is affected by the presence of the charge; an electric field is established in that space. A charged object creates an electric ffield.

Now to answer your question lets lookat AC shall we.If the terminals constantly switch their polarity from (+) to (−) and back again, the direction of the electrons alternates back-and-forth and is called alternating current or AC electricity. Now what is it at its most basic its movement of a charge. Im not going to go into atoms as this would take to much time.

Charge is a property of matter–just like mass, volume, or density. In order to move charge we need charge carriers, and that’s where our knowledge of atomic particles–specifically electrons and protons–comes in handy. Electrons in atoms can act as our charge carrier, because every electron carries a negative charge. If we can free an electron from an atom and force it to move, we can create electricity. This movement creates an Electric field this IS the pulling or pushing force in a space between charges. The charges are propelled by an electric field. We need a source of electric potential (voltage), which pushes electrons from a point of low potential energy to higher potential energy. See Coulombs law

en.m.wikipedia.org...

Ps you learn this in high school physics.
edit on 10/2/17 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:23 AM
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a reply to: Phage


As an engineer, I would think you could provide one.

Personally, I would be wary of ANY systems transmitting electricity using the conductivity of Earth. Professionally I would NEVER design or approve such design. They comes strictly from cash saving paradigm. But as we all know, even an engineer need a paycheck and that is why such thing get approved.

Seem to me a CLEAR answer Phage. No rhetorics, no deflection... Anything else you need to know?



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: Cofactor

So. Tesla's notion was not valid.

I agree.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr


Since, YOU, have a clear undertanding of the "science", do you think electricity is due to electron moving in one direction, or HOLES created from them moving in opposite direction?

I think you missed the fact that it was more cynism than a question.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: Phage


As an engineer, I would think you could provide one.

Personally, I would be wary of ANY systems transmitting electricity using the conductivity of Earth. Professionally I would NEVER design or approve such design. They comes strictly from cash saving paradigm. But as we all know, even an engineer need a paycheck and that is why such thing get approved.

Seem to me a CLEAR answer Phage. No rhetorics, no deflection... Anything else you need to know?


And why would you not recommend it? Simple resistance you waist alot of the charge. I can pass electricity through rubber if i have enough voltage but its a waist of energy.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 12:44 AM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: dragonridr


Since, YOU, have a clear undertanding of the "science", do you think electricity is due to electron moving in one direction, or HOLES created from them moving in opposite direction?

I think you missed the fact that it was more cynism than a question.


Sorry i often have toteach 1st year physics students things they should have learned in high school. Most of the first semester is reteaching what they misunderstood. So i can tend to get wordy.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 01:02 AM
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Oh.

My.

God.

I cannot believe the ignorance I have seen on just the first and last page of this thread.

Firstly, JP Morgan was not the financier behind Wardenclyff. Westinghouse was. Morgan was the financier behind Edison, and threatened to destroy Westinghouse through a long drawn-out court battle over patent rights, after Tesla beat out Edison for a contract to light a science exhibition. Westinghouse folded and gave up many of Tesla's patent rights to protect himself.

Wardenclyff was NOT 'free energy.' It was simply an attempt to transmit electric power wirelessly. The idea of free energy comes from the fact that the receivers could conceivably be built by anyone and there was no way to disable them... meaning an enterprising person could build one, connect it to his home, and draw electricity from Wardenclyff without paying for it. Westinghouse pulled the plug on Tesla when he realized this economic flaw. Tesla went into a depression and never fully recovered.

The FBI did indeed raid his home at his death and took many of his documents. To this day no one knows what was taken.

Tesla was also not just an experimenter. I thought he was for a very long time, until I had the opportunity to peruse some of his notes. The man had a deep understanding of electrical/magnetic phenomena and a seriously solid mathematical background. He was an engineer by trade, but a scientist at heart, which is not that unusual. The two are closely related.

It's not that hard to look up actual facts about Nkola Tesla. It's just inconvenient when the facts are at odds with the myths/legends.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Lol you are wrong about everything you said



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Simple resistance you waist alot of the charge.

You mean when passing a current thru a resistor, charge is not conserved?! Those electrons evaporate somewhere?


I can pass electricity through rubber if i have enough voltage but its a waist of energy.

Voltage is NOT energy. Drop of voltage multiplied by current multiplied by time IS energy. Don't you think increasing voltage decrease I2R losses?

In HVDC power lines, do you have an idea of the magitude of Ohmic losses vs Corona loss???

I think you don't know what your talking about! Stop wasting my time.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Apparently, Donald Trumps Uncle had access to several doc's. Some speculate one of them was regarding time travel.



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles

The concept that he has brought is very next generation and I will be very happy if it becomes successful. The technologies of the past few decades have been very helpful for us in many ways. I'm sure this one will be too.




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