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Nikola Tesla - Free Energy

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posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 01:50 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles
Actually, his English was very good.


“Yes,” he replied to an unasked question. “Yes, I loved that pigeon, I loved her as a man loves a woman, and she loved me. When she was ill, I knew, and understood; she came to my room and I stayed beside her for days. I nursed her back to health. That pigeon was the joy of my life. If she needed me, nothing else mattered. As long as I had her, there was a purpose in my life.

“Then one night as I was lying in my bed in the dark, solving problems, as usual, she flew in through the open window and stood on my desk. I knew she wanted me; she wanted to tell me something important so I got up and went to her.

“As I looked at her I knew she wanted to tell me—she was dying. And then, as I got her message, there came a light from her eyes—powerful beams of light.

“Yes,” he continued, again answering an unasked question, “it was a real light, a powerful, dazzling, blinding light, a light more intense than I had ever produced by the most powerful lamps in my laboratory.

www.cabinetmagazine.org...




posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 05:30 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles

Are you telling me that a guy who spent over 60 years speaking English in an English speaking country didn't speak very good English?

K.



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language

edit on 8102017 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2017 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language


He did also at times went catatonic during speeches. When it happened he would claim he just travelled to the future. He really was nuts

But why I find funny does anyone seriously believe Tesla a man around when they first started experimenting with electricity knows more than the thousands of electrical engineers with a PHD? We've learned so many things since then that an electrical engineer today would make him look like a fool. You can't take him out of context and say he knew things that others do not simply not true in fact quite the opisit he had a limited understanding because of when he was born.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language
he didnt reveal it, but imo it could have been an angel



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language
he didnt reveal it, but imo it could have been an angel


Right.

Making things up just so you don’t have to admit that he was a bit on the looney side and loved a pigeon.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Didn’t you know? He gets credit for everything, especially the things he had nothing to do with.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language
he didnt reveal it, but imo it could have been an angel


Right.

Making things up just so you don’t have to admit that he was a bit on the looney side and loved a pigeon.
how stupid of you, making up what things? I have an opinion just as everyone else.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: Phage

case in point that pigeon was an angel in disguise


Are you sure he meant angel?

After all, you did say

english was not his first language
he didnt reveal it, but imo it could have been an angel


Right.

Making things up just so you don’t have to admit that he was a bit on the looney side and loved a pigeon.
how stupid of you, making up what things? I have an opinion just as everyone else.


Yes, we know. You’re full of opinions.

Like the pigeon he loved was an angel, or he didn’t speak very good English because it wasn’t his first language.

Any excuse to not have to admit your deity was a nut case.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: surfer_soul

If you want to use Wikipedia, fine.



The first commutator-free two phase AC induction motor was invented by Hungarian engineer Ottó Bláthy, he used the two phase motor to propel his invention, the Electricity meter [9][10]

Wikipedia


Speaking of making things up, I thought it was very odd why no other sources mentioned Ottó Bláthy as having anything to do with the invention of the first AC induction motor.
In fact I checked the wiki page you linked about 5 days ago and I couldn't recall it saying any such thing either, nor was it mentioned on the Wikipedia page dedicated to Bláthy's inventions. So I thought I would do a little fact checking and according to the web archive, the last time that wiki page about induction motors was saved on July 14th 2017 it said no such thing either!


In 1824, the French physicist François Arago formulated the existence of rotating magnetic fields, termed Arago's rotations. By manually turning switches on and off, Walter Baily demonstrated this in 1879, effectively the first primitive induction motor.[2][3][4][5]

The first AC commutator-free induction motors were independently invented by Galileo Ferraris and Nikola Tesla, a working motor model having been demonstrated by the former in 1885 and by the latter in 1887. Tesla applied for US patents in October and November 1887 and was granted some of these patents in May 1888.


en.wikipedia.org..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">web.archive.org...://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_motor
If the above link isn't working, simply put the URL of the wiki page in question Here into the web.archive.org search engine, and then select the most recent date the page was archived.

Here's what that page currently says...I've highlighted in bold the "new" additions... My BS meter went off because it was Dobrovolsky who first developed 3 phaze.


In 1824, the French physicist François Arago formulated the existence of rotating magnetic fields, termed Arago's rotations. By manually turning switches on and off, Walter Baily demonstrated this in 1879, effectively the first primitive induction motor.[2][3][4][5][6][6][7][8]
The first commutator-free two phase AC induction motor was invented by Hungarian engineer Ottó Bláthy, he used the two phase motor to propel his invention, the Electricity meter [9][10]
The first AC commutator-free three-phase induction motors were independently invented by Galileo Ferraris and Nikola Tesla, a working motor model having been demonstrated by the former in 1885 and by the latter in 1887. Tesla applied for US patents in October and November 1887 and was granted some of these patents in May 1888.


source

Well it appears I've learned something from this thread after all, not to trust Wikipedia as a source anymore without fact checking it first. If it can so easily be edited with misinformation by someone with their own agenda, then the people that manage that site should be alerted and take measures to prevent it from happening. It's supposed to be a factual website isn't it?


edit on 10-10-2017 by surfer_soul because: fixed link



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Same wiki page, go down to history, 2nd paragraph after the 2 pictures.


The first commutator-free two phase AC induction motor was invented by Hungarian engineer Ottó Bláthy, he used the two phase motor to propel his invention, the Electricity meter [9][10]


But yes, they do have things wrong. Like crediting Tesla and Ferraris for the first 3 stage.

ETA: Link supplied by AM some pages ago show the timeline. It also shows Tesla wasn’t first. link
edit on 10102017 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Not in the web archive it doesn't! It says nothing of the sort about Ottó Bláthy, nor does any other source I've found mention him either.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 03:07 PM
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While some of his work may be documented and I am by no means an expert on anything he actually created.

I am an expert on one area...Not a single person on ATS ever met the man or has any idea of what he knew, felt or was intending in everything he did.


Sheesh people get a grip and stop acting like you knew Nikola Tesla and his inner workings and beliefs.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 03:10 PM
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originally posted by: surfer_soul
a reply to: TerryDon79

Not in the web archive it doesn't! It says nothing of the sort about Ottó Bláthy, nor does any other source I've found mention him either.


I wouldn’t know, because your link isn’t working. But I went to wiki and it’s there.

Like I said, I was just quoting wiki to prove a point.

Try reading a few pages back. AM posted a history. Tesla didn’t invent it. (Here's the link)



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

The link you've just posted backs up everything I've been saying, and it's easy enough to check the wiki page in the way back machine Here Just post the wiki page in the search at the top.

I've followed this thread from the start, I haven't had time to reply to everyone, but I've read some misinfo so got involved. I dare say I know more about Electrical Engineering generally than AM and Phage combined, not that they aren't up on other subjects but I doubt they have spent a few years studying EE.
It's easy enough to ask Siri or whatever you like these days and get a quick answer, but there's a difference between that and actually knowing the subject your discussing, and it's particularly difficult when it comes to EE as quick answers will still leave you clueless on the subject unless you actually spend time studying it.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Actually, if you read the link I provided (thanks AM), you’ll see Tesla didn’t invent the ac induction motor.

But keep on coming back, even though you said you wouldn’t



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

I think it's true with some people you'll never get through to them, no matter how hard you try. But I'm a bit of a stickler for truth and isn't this site about denying ignorance?

Actually in the link you provided you'll see it states this:


1882-1889 Nikola Tesla (Croatian, naturalized US-American) already thinks about a multi-phase voltage system while studying in Graz / Austria in 1882. He emigrates to America in 1884 and launches a small company and development laboratory in 1886 in New York. Meanwhile, the Italian professor Ferraris is successful in building a small two-phase induction motor in 1885 (see below). Tesla knows nothing of Ferraris' induction motor and reinvents it shortly thereafter. He also builds a series of functional models.


and this:


1885 Galileo Ferraris (Italian) builds the first induction motor. Like Tesla, he uses two phases. However, Ferrari believes incorrectly that such motors can never exceed an efficiency of 50%. He therefore loses interest and does not continue to develop his machines.



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul




The link you've just posted backs up everything I've been saying, and it's easy enough to check the wiki page in the way back machine Here Just post the wiki page in the search at the top.

It's also easy to see the history of edits.
History
edit on 10/10/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

I know, right? You can’t even read sources very well.

Here’s a hint: It doesn’t say Tesla invented the AC induction motor.



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