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A380 engine disintegrates over Atlantic

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posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Barnalby

It's not like you NEED N1. The wind will spin the engine, and they have enough fuel to deal with the extra drag.




posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

Yes. That was taken by a maintenance guy after they landed. The investigators are on scene now and they'll change it after they give the ok.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
a month or so ago i was flying with my dad and they sucked a bird threw the blades and it's just getting out of the 'shop' and the engine was still intact, i know they did work on the blades but im not sure what else was done ill ask the guys when i see them.


i would have flip[ed my lid if i was on that flight(A380) that's intense to rip most on the nacelle off
edit on 4-10-2017 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

We were talking about it in a maintenance group, and the general reaction of most of us would have been, "God Dammit. What shift gotta deal with that crap now."



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 03:21 PM
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posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

ohhh not AS bad as i thought, the one pic looked like it was just the front fan and the rear compressor blades were gone. close call on the wing damage, that could have been really bad a few feet to either side.


i remember seeing pictures of a member of a crew(for got of what) that got sucked into the turbine and it was much more than hamburger



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 04:09 PM
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They found several large pieces in Greenland, from the initial separation.




posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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In a surprising twist, the aircraft will fly back to France on three engines. In another WTF moment, they're replacing the #4 engine before the flight, but won't run the engine.

blog.flightradar24.com...


edit on 10/11/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/11/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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Did any of the fan hit the fuselage?

Or did the damage stay around the engine and wing?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: grey580

It seems like it was all around the pylon.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm pretty sure that the weight of the engine is needed for flight.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

It is, but if you're putting a new engine on anyway, fly it to LAX or somewhere with all four running and contract the inspection. As it is, with three running they're limited to something like 7 hours at a time.
edit on 10/11/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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Just spoke to my sister in law that works for a company that repairs cowls and thrust reversers.

She said she'd hate to be the last person that worked on that engine.

The FAA is gonna be doing some inspections.



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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any word if they fixed the leading edge of the wing? Looks like some damage there.

I guess it just easier to do this at home than in situ? Or head to a US airport that has extensive facilities? I realize that the plane esp lightly loaded would be fine with the thrust of 3 engines, but you lose an engine on the same side as the windmilling one you are going to have a lively flight so why risk it?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
The FAA is gonna be doing some inspections.


Would the FAA be the lead though? The event was over Canada and originated in France. So Canada and France lead this sucker with the FAA as sort of a interested party?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Component similarity with other engines. The GP7200 uses bits of the PW4000, and GE90. The FAA will have people involved to see what they find, and order inspections on US engines based on that.

PW4000:


Airbus A300-600
Airbus A310-300
Airbus A330
Boeing 747-400
Boeing 767-200ER/-300(ER)/-400ER/Boeing KC-46
Boeing 777-200(ER)/-300
McDonnell Douglas MD-11
Scaled Composites Stratolaunch

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 10/11/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: FredT



Good question. I forgot it happened in Canada.

Does the FAA get called in?



posted on Oct, 11 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: FredT



Good question. I forgot it happened in Canada.

Does the FAA get called in?


Zaph mentioned above because of the commonality of the engine, they will be part of the investigation and if recommendations are made those can be enforced int he US etc.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

They could have done an inspection and found that the engine mount was fine, but the wiring or fuel feed could have been damaged.



posted on Oct, 12 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

From the sound of things, they're not even that far. They're talking about putting the bad engine in storage, until they can find a way to transport it back to the UK.



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