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A380 engine disintegrates over Atlantic

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posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Cheers for clearing that up I knew they'd have enough power to fly on the 3 engines especially with no passengers or luggage on board just wasn't sure of it was allowed or not.




posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

One of the few times I've seen it done was with an ATI DC-8 out of Hawaii. One of their ground crew went to plug the comm cord in before they fully shut down. On the DC-8 that meant the bottom of #3 engine. He ended up shelling it out.

Since no one flew DC-8s anymore they couldn't get a spare locally, and couldn't get space to fly one in. Since they were looking at 10+ days to get the replacement on site, the FAA allowed them to fly on three engines to a repair base in California. It was an interesting takeoff, and they barely had the fuel to make it, even with just the flight crew on board.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: Woody510
a reply to: Zaphod58

Is it the same family of rolls Royce engines as the A330 that had a problem the other month?


No, It's a different engine made by Engine Alliance. The fan blades are made of titanium. Looks like the cowling disintegrated and was sucked into the engine. Didn't do the fan blades much good.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

Those fan blades are also fragile as hell, and have been known to come apart in flight and cause the cowling to shred.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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dang, i figured more bracing would be there...great pics

those fans are too big not to be fragile, huh...@ Zaphod...do they ever get frozen ducks....?

my brother went to Bell one day and they were throwing frozen chickens at the pure turbines...before we saw a turbofan back in the sixties
edit on 30-9-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-9-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I can remember watching a documentary on the Rolls Royce factory and if I remember correctly aren't the fan blades hollow?



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

They're honeycombs IIRC, but essentially, yes. People focus on the titanium part, and how strong titanium is, but I've seen torn up blades because ice went down the engine. It's even worse with a bird.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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Air France uses Boeing 777 for their short hops to JFK in NY, does the A380 have a different cowling than a 777?



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

I would've thought it would depend on what engines are being used? If they use the same engines on the 777 as the A380 then maybe??



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

Boeing 777 produce up to 115,300 lbs of thrust, different engine than A380.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

The cowling is all built the same but is shaped for the engine in question. The A380 has a smaller inlet than the 777 so it has a different cowling.

The GP7200 is 124 inches in diameter, with a fan of 117 inches. The GE90 series up to the -94B is 123 inches at the fan, and the -110, 113, and -115 are 128 inches at the fan.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

Southwest 737 over the Gulf of Mexico:




This was cause by a fan blade that suffered a metal fatigue failure. It separated from the hub, and ripped into the inlet, and the resulting vibration and engine imbalance did the rest.

Safran produces both the fan and low pressure turbine on the CFM56. On the GP7200, the fan is a Pratt&Whitney supplied fan. So it might boil down to whoever makes the individual blades.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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The Vulcan project a couple years ago lost an engine by someone leaving a bag of Desiccant in the intake...



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

It really doesn't take much to cost you an engine. We used to have to sweep the hell out of the ramp ahead of F-16s coming in, or departing, just because they'll put up rocks from 50 feet it seems like.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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Nolinor Aviation sent a 737 to Goose Bay, and Air France is sending a 777 from Montreal to get the passengers out.



posted on Oct, 1 2017 @ 04:41 AM
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Years ago a friend in the family who is a QF A380 captain (ex mirage RAAF pilot) mentioned they were having major issues with the engines at load during climb, he went into pretty good detail but this was 7+ years ago maybe more and I haven't stayed in the local aviation scene. I think QF had had lots of engine trouble that never make it into the media.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

turbine still intact it looks like



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

It's ok, fan stages are overrated, anyways...



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

is that the engine in question?...if so dannnng it looked like a housing issue from the window shot, but the compressor areas is gone...well not gone just lost on the ground somewhere.



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