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A380 engine disintegrates over Atlantic

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posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 12:48 PM
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This is just breaking into to media an Air France A380 has suffered a major engine problem.

link to story

edit on 30-9-2017 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 12:50 PM
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Wow, looks like it's completely sheared off!



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: Churchhousecreeper

Hanging in there by a thread by the looks of it



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

a reply to: Churchhousecreeper

Yes and no. What came off looks like the ring cowling that acts as the inlet for the engine. It looks like at some point the fan came off as well, but the question is did the cowling go and take the fan, or did the fan go and take the cowling.

There are several mounts thar hold the engine that are still intact and holding the engine in place. From the pictures it doesn't look like it was in any danger of separating. This isn't the first time something like this has happened.

Southwest 737 over the Gulf of Mexico:



And once again the media swings and misses. According to several articles the pictures are showing a large chunk of the back of the engine missing.
edit on 9/30/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Is it the same family of rolls Royce engines as the A330 that had a problem the other month?



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

You mean the Air Asia X in Australia?

It looks like Air France uses the GP7200, built by GE.
edit on 9/30/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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Losing the fan is probably pretty jarring for passengers, but is about 95% more boring than compressor failure.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah that was one. Ah right wasn't sure what Air France used for engines.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

They have two options. Rolls offers the Trent 900, and Engine Alliance offers the GP7200. Interestingly Snecma (although they have a different name now) works on both the CFM56 and GP7200. I think there is some overlap on the parts they build too, although I'd have to go back to the report on the Southwest to check.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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Hasn't most of the engine issues of late been GE?



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Oh lord no. They've had a few issues, but they've been spread over a couple different types.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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O boy, hope I didn't work on those blades. Wouldn't be the first time that's happened to something I touched, not a good feeling.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I am not versed on aircraft, but my impression is that the cowl ring is comprised of
carbon fiber. There does seem to be a lot of cowl collapses which does cause one
to wonder if perhaps a metal wouldn't be better suited for this application, since metal tends to hold together better than most manufacturing materials. I do not trust carbon fiber. It feels yucky in my hands when I hit a tennis ball. Didn't an ats member trust this composite with expensive surveying gear whilst exploring a mineshaft, only to have the stuff ruin his week?

Personally, I think the cowl let go. I believe this is is happening frequently, as hidden stresses
silently accrete within the cowl and go unnoticed, awaiting failure.

# 884



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: TheWhiteKnight

There are a couple things they're looking at. One possible problem is part of the engine piping system is creating a vacuum somewhere near the ring cowl that causes a smallb piece to collapse. Once it loses structural integrity, the rest goes with it.

The ring cowling is a mix of aluminium and carbon fiber. It has been built that way for years, and something like 99% of them go through their entire life without any significant problems.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Woody510

a reply to: Churchhousecreeper

Yes and no. What came off looks like the ring cowling that acts as the inlet for the engine. It looks like at some point the fan came off as well, but the question is did the cowling go and take the fan, or did the fan go and take the cowling.

There are several mounts thar hold the engine that are still intact and holding the engine in place. From the pictures it doesn't look like it was in any danger of separating. This isn't the first time something like this has happened.

Southwest 737 over the Gulf of Mexico:



And once again the media swings and misses. According to several articles the pictures are showing a large chunk of the back of the engine missing.
I haven't seen anything concerning the rear of the engine I suppose if the cowl went through some of the rear would be damaged?
Quick question when I'm on the desktop website I get what the speech bubble means, the flags and the stars but what about the trophy and lightning bolt?
edit on 30-9-2017 by Woody510 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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That'll buff right out...



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

The engine was almost certainly shelled out by debris going through it. Looking at the pics of the entire engine, there's nothing wrong with the exhaust portion of the engine, the people that wrote those articles are just idiots.

Karma and WATS. They were used in previous iterations of the board. They don't do much now. I believe WATS is used to be able to start threads in certain forums, such as 9/11, but that's about it.
edit on 9/30/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: 00018GE

Slap a new ring cowl on it, a little bondo and maybe some 200 mph tape and it'll be good as new.



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

When they replace the engine Zaph will one be flown out to Newfoundland and replaced there or take the damaged engine off and fly on to somewhere else or is that a big no no?



posted on Sep, 30 2017 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: Woody510

They'll probably fly an engine and crew to them. They occasionally will fly an aircraft with a damaged engine on three engines but there has to be a good reason for it. They'll probably contract an An-124 and fly the engine in. They'll replace the engine and strut and check the wing for damage.



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