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A Light Drizzle of Fish in Mexico

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posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I wrote a thread about something similar a few years ago. There were reported fish falls in Nowheresville, Australia and I spent a few days looking at as much information as I could winkle out. By the end of it, I couldn't really say what happened.

The weather explanation didn't fit and nobody's thinking terrestrial fishes are popping out of wormholes in the sky. The fish/es are always native to us and local to where they land. The mode of delivery in the Australian case remained unconfirmed - a curiosity.




posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky



Nowheresville, Australia


Is that an actual place? I mean, there is a place called Boring. In Oregon.

I don't trust anecdotes, generally. Been fished in a couple of times.

Get it?
edit on 9/29/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 12:58 AM
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a reply to: Phage

No, I made it up because I couldn't be arsed locating the thread.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

So. You expect me to accept the rest of your tail?

Get it?



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:02 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Oh go and sling your hook!!

hehehe



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: Phage




Is that an actual place?


Not sure about nowheresville but there is a place called Nowhere Else here in South Australia . Its a bit hard to find as it is no longer sign posted as the signs were pinched as soon as they were put up . How do i know this , well this one time .....

Australian raining fish story .
www.dailymail.co.uk...
edit on 29-9-2017 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:20 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

No matter where you go, there you are.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:27 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

Wait. People got stunned by falling fish?
I hope they recovered.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Not even sure what that means .



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

In joke.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 02:10 AM
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"I don't know if it's climate change," he said, "but we've had tornadoes, storms, rains, floods, raining fish, eclipses, earthquakes, all kinds of natural phenomena that we aren't used to, but that we are experiencing these days."

Eh? How old is this guy? A thousand years old? FFS.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 02:33 AM
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a reply to: and14263

He does make it sound like he's lived through several lifetimes worth of calamities.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:03 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky


The weather explanation didn't fit and nobody's thinking terrestrial fishes are popping out of wormholes in the sky.


Oh, I'm sure somewhere, somebody is thinking exactly that. Remember the "theory" that lake monsters were either flitting through wormholes or we were somehow seeing living dinosaurs in the past (or maybe that the were all dinosaurs traveling back and forth from the past?). I'm too lazy to look it up but I believe there something about high concentrations of quartz.

For every potential anomalous phenomena, it seems like somebody has a cockamamie hypothesis involving wormholes aka the super science-y term, portals.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

For those who don't know what you're referring to when you say, Kentucky Meat Shower (which sounds a wee bit like something involving a trans prostitute and a Waffle House):


The Kentucky meat shower was an incident occurring for a period of several minutes on March 3, 1876, where what appeared to be flakes of red meat fell from the sky in a 100-by-50-yard (91 by 46 m) area near the settlement of Rankin in Bath County, Kentucky.[1] Most of the pieces were approximately 5 centimetres (2.0 in) square; at least one was 10 centimetres (3.9 in) square.[2] The phenomenon was reported by Scientific American, the New York Times,[3] and several other publications at the time.[1][4]

The meat appeared to be beef, but according to the first report in Scientific American, two gentlemen who tasted it judged it to be mutton or venison.[5] B. F. Ellington, a local hunter, identified it as bear meat.[6] Writing in the Sanitarian, Leopold Brandeis identified the substance as Nostoc, a genus of cyanobacteria.[1] Brandeis passed the meat sample to the Newark Scientific Association for further analysis, leading to a letter from Dr. Allan McLane Hamilton appearing in the Medical Record and stating that the meat had been identified as lung tissue from either a horse or a human infant, "the structure of the organ in these two cases being almost identical".[5][7] The makeup of this sample was backed up by further analysis, with two samples of the meat being identified as lung tissue, three as muscle, and two as cartilage.[5]

Brandeis' Nostoc theory relied on the fact that Nostoc swells into a translucent jelly-like mass when rain falls on it, often giving the impression that it was falling with the rain.[2] Charles Fort pointed out in his first book, The Book of the Damned, that there had been no rain.[1] Locals favored the explanation that the meat was vomited up by buzzards, "who, as is their custom, seeing one of their companions disgorge himself, immediately followed suit".[5] Dr. L. D. Kastenbine presented this theory in the Louisville Medical News as the best explanation of the variety of meat.[2] Vultures vomit as part of making a quick escape and also as a defensive mechanism when threatened.[6] Fort explained the flattened, dry appearance of the meat chunks as the result of pressure, and noted that nine days later, on March 12, 1876, red "corpuscles" with a "vegetable" appearance fell over London.[8]



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:10 AM
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a reply to: Kester

The first reply in your thread, lol:


Don't lick it if its blue.


As if licking ice found in a crater in your yard is every really advisable, regardless of the color.




posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: interupt42
a reply to: theantediluvian

You are not paying attention.

Mexico is clearly in the initial stages of operation 1 . The purpose of Operation 1 is to find and test measures to circumvent the wall. We must take this seriously and forget the wall , we need a dome.


I can just hear Trump now.

"When Mexico sends us their fish, they're not sending good fish. They're sending bad fish. Fish with problems. These fish are bringing crimes, they're bringing drugs, they're rapist and I imagine, some of the fish are good to eat."



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:22 AM
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Must be propaganda, I don't give me none of that fake news BS.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian

originally posted by: interupt42
a reply to: theantediluvian

You are not paying attention.

Mexico is clearly in the initial stages of operation 1 . The purpose of Operation 1 is to find and test measures to circumvent the wall. We must take this seriously and forget the wall , we need a dome.


I can just hear Trump now.

"When Mexico sends us their fish, they're not sending good fish. They're sending bad fish. Fish with problems. These fish are bringing crimes, they're bringing drugs, they're rapist and I imagine, some of the fish are good to eat."



LOL , I read it in his voice.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
According to the Tamaulipas Civil Protection director, Pedro Granados, who can be seen in an interview on the office's Facebook page, witnesses observed a number of small fish falling from the sky during a rain shower.

Pictures from another of the office's FB posts show one of the formerly flying fish, found where it fell, and few of its fellows that had been collected.




The curious event reportedly took place in the small coastal town of Tampico on Tuesday. Not a lot more in the way of details. It seems that it was only a very small number of very small fish. An NPR story about the event provides the following quote from Mr. Granados:


For Granados, though, the reason for what happened Tuesday in Tampico is far less clear.

"I don't know if it's climate change," he said, "but we've had tornadoes, storms, rains, floods, raining fish, eclipses, earthquakes, all kinds of natural phenomena that we aren't used to, but that we are experiencing these days."


Personally, if I were a citizen of the state of Tamaulipas, those words wouldn't inspire a lot of confidence in me for that guy. The NPR story also mentions an interesting and apparently annual phenomenon that takes place in Honduras. I have to admit, I was completely unfamiliar with this particular periodic piscatorial precipitation until reading about it this very evening.


In a small Honduran farming town, residents told The New York Times that powerful rainstorms bring fish with such regularity, they've marked them with an annual festival they have celebrated for decades. Many people in the inland town said it's their one chance to eat seafood. Their explanation for the phenomenon:

"It's a miracle," one farmer told the Times. "We see it as a blessing from God."


(FYI: the linked NYT article is from June of this year.)

I'd rather receive a blessing of shrimp and crab but hey, to each his own.


Read about this phenomenon in other areas. Seems like I recall them relating it to water spouts?

I'd rather it rained dry aged tomahawk steaks personally....



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian
The one appears to be a gambusia, possibly a mosquito fish.
Mosquito Fish



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