It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Italian Typhoon crashes during airshow

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 02:41 PM
link   
An Italaian Typhoon crashed into the ocean during the Terracina airshow. The pilot was killed. The crash was captured on multiple videos from multiple angles and it appears that the pilot never pulled out of the loop, and did not eject prior to the crash.

I wonder if the pilot was performing the maneuvers lower than normal because of the scattered cloud deck? Or GLOC? and rode it down?

A composite still of the video is pretty hazy and its hard to make out the position of the canards and other maneuvering surfaces prior to impact.

Condolences to the pilots family and all in all its been a rough 2017 for military aircraft.



theaviationist.com...




posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 02:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: FredT
An Italaian Typhoon crashed into the ocean during the Terracina airshow. The pilot was killed. The crash was captured on multiple videos from multiple angles and it appears that the pilot never pulled out of the loop, and did not eject prior to the crash.

I wonder if the pilot was performing the maneuvers lower than normal because of the scattered cloud deck? Or GLOC? and rode it down?

A composite still of the video is pretty hazy and its hard to make out the position of the canards and other maneuvering surfaces prior to impact.

Condolences to the pilots family and all in all its been a rough 2017 for military aircraft.



theaviationist.com...


Yes, it's sad when that happens. It's hard to even think what might have happened from the video.



posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 03:02 PM
link   
Wow.

That's pretty horrible. I wonder what happened that he didn't eject.



posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 03:15 PM
link   
a reply to: grey580

He may have thought he was going to be able to make it and did not eject. That's my guess.



posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 05:05 PM
link   
a reply to: grey580

Most of the time it's a case of "I can save it" and they simply ride it in.

In this case he was a test pilot, who had also trained with the US Fighter Weapons School. Sadly his parents and girlfriend were watching at the time.



posted on Sep, 25 2017 @ 06:25 PM
link   
Yikes, that's terrible. Condolences to the family and friends.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 03:25 AM
link   
Here is a video from another angle (jump to 5 min).


Looks like he was simply too low when he initiated that loop.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 04:18 AM
link   
Tragic, that is awful to see. They usually plan these displays meticulously, do you think there are different rules over the sea ie. no runway line which you cannot cross and maneuvers away from the crowds?

What about reflection from the sea, it can probably impare your vision but can it effect lift or anything?

I suppose with these level of technology, speed and maneuverability, accidents will happen.

Mark Bowman (is/was) our Typhoon test pilot at BAES and he always took a few seconds to compose himself because he said you were about to have the most exhilarating ride of your life, every time!

He died fast doing what he loved, RIP.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 04:38 AM
link   
a reply to: Forensick

From what I've heard over the years, it's a lot harder to judge your altitude over water. You have more freedom with the crowd being away from the stage, but it's a lot easier to get in trouble if you aren't careful.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 02:14 PM
link   
Sad loss. RIP.

The Typhoon wasn't close to the boat. It is just telephoto perspective.




posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 02:32 PM
link   
a reply to: tommyjo

You could tell he hadn't even really started to recover in the video but I didn't realize he was that far off.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 03:06 PM
link   
a reply to: tommyjo

Yeah the control surfaces and the canards look barely deflected



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 03:59 PM
link   
I have to wonder if there might have been something wrong with the Typhoon's oxygen system.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 04:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

I've been told that over water the pilot should set the Radar Altimeter to give a warning at an altitude to allow you to pull out in time.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 04:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: JIMC5499
I have to wonder if there might have been something wrong with the Typhoon's oxygen system.


I wonder as well. Also as I pointed out in the OP could the cloud deck forced the routine lower and the pilot failed to adjust?



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 04:28 PM
link   
The Typhoon can be equipped with terrain avoidance systems. The wiki page seems to indicate an alert but not the automated pull up we saw with the F-16 video poster in this forum a while back.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 9/26/17 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 09:19 AM
link   
This was the same aircraft seen at last years RIAT. My thoughts are will those affected by this tragic loss




posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 11:35 AM
link   
Man. He was hauling through that maneuver. I think he was just too fast and was arcing. I don't know why he's still in burner at that point in the manuever. He never gets his nose up during that pull, which means he wasn't even close to completing that maneuver.

When performing aerobatics, you have checkpoints/standards. For instance, the top of the loop, you might plan to be at 6k' with 200 knots. As you descend, you can adjust power and G to carve out your bottom half. It looks like he's doing a couple hundred knots over the top, which makes your turn radius much larger. But he should have recognized that when he was bullseyed nose low. He could do an altitude check to ensure he had the airspace to make the last 90 degrees, if you don't, you need to punch out right there. Instead, he sticks with it, leaves the power in burner and tries to scoop it out. Looks weird to me. He turn radius is quite large and he never reefs on the AOA like he's panicking.

Lastly, over the water you can use the barometric altimeter because you know exactly what level earth is at, since it's at sea level. There is some lag, but it's pretty good. RadAlt will actually penetrate water and give bad readings. I've been zorching over the water at only a few hundred feet and the RadAlt told me I was a few thousand feet up.




top topics



 
6

log in

join