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Battle Over Confederate Monuments Moves to the Cemeteries

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posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 04:46 AM
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Wow. Now the statue-wreckers want to remove not just statues and public monuments to "historical" Confederate figures, but memorials to everyday soldiers in the one place where such a memorial ought to be acceptable: graveyards.

Source

From the article:



The calls to remove the monument in Madison, and other monuments like it, have given rise to questions of the place of Confederate memorials and cemeteries in daily life: Is a monument in a cemetery really on public display? Though most people rarely enter cemeteries, are their contents — statues, monuments and plaques — subject to scrutiny by people in the community? While a Confederate statue in a busy town square honors the dead, does a monument in a tranquil, little-trafficked cemetery have the same effect?

“These are markers to a person’s grave,” said David Sloane, a historian at the University of Southern California who has written two books on cemeteries. “Cemetery memorials do have a different meaning than a symbolic public memorial on the highways and byways of the city or in a public park.”

The monument targeted for removal, boxy and carved from a smooth gray granite, is engraved with the names of dozens of soldiers, mostly men who were imprisoned and died at nearby Camp Randall during the Civil War. It stands prominently in front of the men’s graves, their names chiseled on their headstones in simple block letters — C. A. Hollingsworth, H. Faulks and L. Galloway among them — alongside their regiments and home states, frequently Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi.


Here's a picture of this horribly offensive monument:



Now in all fairness I must say that they're not talking about removing the actual gravestones. But good grief--what is wrong with us? This isn't some statue of a "valiant Confederate warrior" mounted on his magnificent steed and "glorifying the cause." It's a plain, unadorned tribute primarily to--if you read the inscription--a woman who faithfully tended the graves of these plain, everyday soldiers. Are we going to go around knocking down gravestones next, just because the bodies beneath them fought for the Confederacy?

This makes me terribly sad. If I were one of the descendants of these men--if it were my great-great-grandfather whose name was on that monument, or my great-great grandmother who cared for the graves, I would be incensed.

How about Confederate graveyards? Are they offensive? Do we need to remove them too? Where does this end, honestly? What is the next item for destruction once everything associated with the losers of our terrible Civil War has been destroyed or tucked away out of site because it offends someone?
edit on 22-9-2017 by riiver because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 04:59 AM
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a reply to: riiver


So much for RIP. It is very sad. I wonder when it will end. I wonder if any of these people even owned slaves.
Off to work I go............where is that coffee.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 05:04 AM
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And someone will be along shortly to say how this is not that important I am sure, its just a piece of cloth, its just street sign, its just a statue, its just a grave marker can now be added to the list.

With all that is going on in the world its terribly sad to me that this is what people choose to get offended by.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 05:26 AM
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Daaaaamn. You go messing with people's graves and there's no telling what 'demons' may conjure up in response. Human beings are at their kookiest when it comes to funerals, and all the details there in all that realm of affairs.

Your goal is to incite a hot civil war out of all the crazy divisive stuff we've seen from them this move and the self one upmanship of what comes next (the tombstones, and then after that?) this is perhaps the most telling that theyre here not for these "oppressed" groups and what's best for them in the long run, but instead to cause total divisive havoc.

As an aside, this stamping out of history that which 'we love to troll into a war' stuff with, go look up censorship with the Leninists and then the Maoists. The key to their propaganda model was "Cultural Revolution" (to usher in communism and it reign supreme for ever and ever). And the key to the whole blueprint was utterly erasing every shred of print or art that gave anyone any sense of how things were before the communists takeover. There Only Ever Was Communism was the 'completed model' of their ruthless control freak tyrannical ambitions.

Chilling.
edit on 22-9-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 05:34 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
And someone will be along shortly to say how this is not that important I am sure, its just a piece of cloth, its just street sign, its just a statue, its just a grave marker can now be added to the list.

With all that is going on in the world its terribly sad to me that this is what people choose to get offended by.

But thats sort of the whole idea isn't it? A safe subject, a useless distraction train, going nowhere. Like burying our heads in 911 rubble or focusing on chemtrails, which bathroom to use, skin color, these are 'acceptable' issues before the masses, promoted by the media.

God forbid people should get excited about any thing really important.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: riiver

If this is what we are coming to be, why not just remove all the headstones and dig up the coffins? I am sure these folks won't mind, so we can start with their mothers and fathers.
I don't doubt the land could be used for some other purpose like building some of these same people free housing in the same place their families now occupy.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:03 AM
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I once read a story about what happen in South Vietnam after the war. The unification government bulldozed the grave yards of the soldiers that fought with the US, because the memory of the war was offensive to the people.

Do we really want to emulate?



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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the problem is [ my opinion ] :

that for these idiots to remain " newsworthy " - they have to keep shifting the goal posts

thus thier " targets " will become exponentally more bizarre and desperate



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:17 AM
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And what about the Indian graves. There is a small town on Lake Minnetonka called Mound. Many houses were buried there over the Indian Burials. You actually went in dirt basements of some houses and there was a big mound of dirt-the burial site. Before the law was passed that it was against the removal of the Indian burial grounds, they just bulldozed the burials away and built houses. After the law, these burial areas dotting the entire town were not allowed to be moved-they were built over and kept in old dirt basements. Really creepy.

I do believe as time goes by and land becomes even more precious-all of these cemeteries will disappear. Developers are already moving them to build on cemetery land because of its valuable location.

In the future-there will be no burials on land-too precious. Cremation accounts for half of body disposal now. So, in the future there will probably be no problems with cemeteries being "offensive."


edit on 22-9-2017 by Justso because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:19 AM
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originally posted by: tinymind
If this is what we are coming to be, why not just remove all the headstones and dig up the coffins?

Yes, that was the mediaeval pattern. Someone is thought to have died in disgrace or especially heresy, his body is disinterred and thrown onto the rubbish tip. I think it happened to at least one Pope, so a Confederate general need not be immune.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:46 AM
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a reply to: riiver

Confederate cemeteries, specifically, are protected by federal law and cant be replaced / removed. Congress made sure to give confederate soldiers the exact same status as Union soldiers who dies during the civil war.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:50 AM
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Winter is coming it'll be something new in the spring. Just like occupy wall Street died over the winter



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:55 AM
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It is almost like it is time for the parents to put their foot down and tell a toddler that their tantrum has went too far.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 06:58 AM
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The article is actually more realistic than I would have anticipated. Bravo.

Clearly, there are different feelings among the public about these objects.

However, in every case thus far, it is the city, county or State governments that have chosen to remove these objects from public lands.

For better, or worse, that means that the elected officials of the People have done their jobs. Most of the situations I have studied in depth (like Charlottesville, VA for example) have had months and years of public meetings.

These are examples of local determination in action.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: riiver

I have said it a few times, but I'll just repeat it here again. The retards who push this stuff will not stop until they run out of things to be afraid of. Town's named after civil war generals, counties named after civil war generals, they are already going after schools, and buildings. It was all started when we caved into the flag haters. Once they saw they could get their way by throwing a small tantrum, they decided that throwing a HUGE tantrum, would be better, and you have what we have today.

There will even be those who will defend this, taking down grave markers of civil war soldiers. In graveyards they have never been to. This is a level of stupid that we never saw coming. I believe it's proof of the brain eating amoeba.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:26 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66

These are examples of local determination in action.


prove that. the local part.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Sure, from the second paragraph in the OPs link:



Local officials and residents, outraged by the violence in Charlottesville, Va., last month and determined to clear their cities of markers that glorify the Confederacy, are pushing for the removal of Confederate monuments that have adorned the graves of soldiers for decades.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

thanks.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: Gryphon66

thanks.






Days after the protests in Charlottesville, Paul Soglin, the mayor of Madison, directed that a plaque honoring the Confederacy inside Forest Hill Cemetery, a city-owned property near the University of Wisconsin campus, be removed. The city council will soon consider whether to take out another, larger memorial in the cemetery that is dedicated to Confederate soldiers.



posted on Sep, 22 2017 @ 07:35 AM
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I have posted it before in another thread, but in the county of my birth in Pennsylvania, there are two markers commemorating Confederates, one is actually a grave marker.
US Senator Robert Casey, Jr. (D- PA) has called for them to be removed.
The people of the county want them to stay.
Public Opinion Online

explorepahistory.com

waymarking.com



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