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Puerto Rico is 100% without power after Hurricane Maria — here's why that's a huge problem

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posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 02:53 PM
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Members of the 101st Airborne left on Wednesday with helicopters to help with rescue and recovery. Here's a story: www.theleafchronicle.com...

They had just arrived back in Ft. Campbell from doing Irma relief in Texas.




posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: JIMC5499

I posted in another thread with numbers.

A sub can power some 1200 homes. A carrier can power 12k homes. Or around those numbers.

I agree that a carrier needs to go there and produce some power.


Thing is that producing power does nothing right now. The infrastructure was destroyed! There really isn't any way to get the power there.

That means you are relying on generators which need fuel. So even if you get the fuel. What I heard on the radio this morning is that you have very few roads that can be driven and the governor admits no drivers.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: JIMC5499

I posted in another thread with numbers.

A sub can power some 1200 homes. A carrier can power 12k homes. Or around those numbers.

I agree that a carrier needs to go there and produce some power.


Thing is that producing power does nothing right now. The infrastructure was destroyed! There really isn't any way to get the power there.

That means you are relying on generators which need fuel. So even if you get the fuel. What I heard on the radio this morning is that you have very few roads that can be driven and the governor admits no drivers.


The figure I heard was that only about 20% of the truck drivers are available.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: AndyFromMichigan

I don't know, but the source this morning quoted the governor as begging for truck drivers from anywhere.

But the problem with hooking up the reactor to generate electricity is that it sounds like you have no lines, so you need generators which need fuel, but then you have poor roads to no roads and lack of people who can drive when the roads are there.
edit on 28-9-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: AndyFromMichigan

I don't know, but the source this morning quoted the governor as begging for truck drivers from anywhere.

But the problem with hooking up the reactor to generate electricity is that it sounds like you have no lines, so you need generators which need fuel, but then you have poor roads to no roads and lack of people who can drive when the roads are there.

You also have poor communications (largely because there's no power), so even finding out who needs what is a challenge.

The official death toll in PR is currently something like 25. I'm starting to wonder if there might be large numbers of unreported deaths that we haven't heard about yet. I'm rather suspicious of the reports from those dinky little islands that got blasted with Cat5 winds that leveled everything, and they say that one guy died.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: AndyFromMichigan

Yep.

Thing is that Puerto Rico just basically had modern society wiped out suddenly, overnight, and the logistics of the situation are such that any relief and recovery efforts are operating in near colonial conditions at the moment. That Puerto Rico is an island makes it worse because it's not like Harvey or Irma relief where the disaster gradually gives way to civilization again and you can start working in from the edges.

For the people of Puerto Rico, the disaster doesn't quit.

It all pretty much has to be rebuilt and re-modernized from the ground up, even basic systems. And that's the reality on the ground now for 4 million people.

People should pay sharp attention. This is a microcosm of THTF going on. This is what anyone hit by EMP could expect, and this is precisely how much help you would get too, less.
edit on 28-9-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: grey580

I would agree with you except that there are very few if any ports in Puerto Rico where a carrier can dock. There are several places where subs can. With the damage to the power grid being able to supply power at several places may help more than being able to supply power only to one.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

JIM I'm pretty sure the cruise ship terminal in San Juan is about it. However, you could have the CVN a bit offshore from the port and tender the water in as airlift would be brutal. The Carrier's airwing can stay home and load that sucker up with chinnooks for distribution. No from the carrier mind you but rather from the ship dock

The CVN could take the load off local airports, be a self sufficient airport. Help ferry casualties to the Mercy which is due in soon etc.

I was thinking less about electrical generation. You can live without electricity but NOT water. Plus the USS Ford seems to be the only CVN that has surplus electrical power. Also, even if using a carrier as an offshore power plant is feasible it would be feasable for a small area. It sounds like the distribution method is shot. This is why microgrids are much more robust
edit on 9/28/17 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: FredT

I am unfamiliar with San Juan's port, but I am assuming they can handle the biggest cruise ships, some are slightly bigger than carriers. If so they can dock a CVN there.

A nuclear power at dock will have extra electricity, even if only for a small area.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: FredT

I am unfamiliar with San Juan's port, but I am assuming they can handle the biggest cruise ships, some are slightly bigger than carriers. If so they can dock a CVN there.

A nuclear power at dock will have extra electricity, even if only for a small area.


I get that part, but the Nimitz class CVN's do not produce a huge surplus of electricity. 700+ MW versus 550+ MW. The Ford class has extra extra electricity but its unclear how either could send that electricity to shore (Even at a dock). There is alot of questions here. It sounds like the USN tried or at least thought about using a nuclear sub to generate electricity in Hawaii after it was hit by Iwa in 82 but could not make it work.

Far better to use the CVN as I indicated to shuttle supplies over the island and keep the deep beam docks for cargo ships



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 05:53 PM
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originally posted by: FredT
a reply to: JIMC5499

JIM I'm pretty sure the cruise ship terminal in San Juan is about it. However, you could have the CVN a bit offshore from the port and tender the water in as airlift would be brutal. The Carrier's airwing can stay home and load that sucker up with chinnooks for distribution. No from the carrier mind you but rather from the ship dock

The CVN could take the load off local airports, be a self sufficient airport. Help ferry casualties to the Mercy which is due in soon etc.

I was thinking less about electrical generation. You can live without electricity but NOT water. Plus the USS Ford seems to be the only CVN that has surplus electrical power. Also, even if using a carrier as an offshore power plant is feasible it would be feasable for a small area. It sounds like the distribution method is shot. This is why microgrids are much more robust


That's the big thing, a carrier much less an entire carrier group is capable of making fresh water, as well as distributing huge amounts of canned food. Electricity doesn't really matter. Powering 12 or 12,000 homes matters little when we're talking about 4 million without power, and that doesn't even get into the issue of distributing the electricity. Food, water, and medical supplies are a different story though.

That's to say nothing of medical care, such as moving people to the ships to care for them rather than letting them die in a hospital that can't run it's medical devices without surplus fuel.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 05:58 PM
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They have over 20% of the power back but will take a long time for the next 20% THEN THE NEXT. The hospital ship Comfort is gathering staff and will be headed there I the next couple of days.



edit on 28-9-2017 by mikell because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-9-2017 by mikell because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Lots of good wells in Puerto Rico that could put out 2500 gallons a day with a 3/4 HP pump and a $250 generator would only have to power the well 5 hours with plenty of surplus for lights recharging cell phones, microwave ovens, and ceramic heaters. Gas tank in a car or pickup truck holds enough for a once a week trip into the fuel depot. Many of the roads are passable Puerto Ricans are smart like that..



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: Cauliflower
a reply to: FredT

Lots of good wells in Puerto Rico that could put out 2500 gallons a day with a 3/4 HP pump and a $250 generator would only have to power the well 5 hours with plenty of surplus for lights recharging cell phones, microwave ovens, and ceramic heaters. Gas tank in a car or pickup truck holds enough for a once a week trip into the fuel depot. Many of the roads are passable Puerto Ricans are smart like that..



Yep this is where a solar powered pump would pay huge dividends and use the gas powered generator as a backup. FEMA should simply have huge deplorable stocks of these IMHO as most places have well water that can be used. A google search shows there are alot of companies that can provide this. Plus its good long term. That whole decentralized power generation for basics can go a long way in a disaster



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 06:47 PM
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PR only have one working port in San Juan, before the Roosevelt roads closing that was another area where big ships and carries could stop and it had its own airport, but thanks to the stupidity of the people that base has been close for a long time and the land given back to the government.

And yes PR only have one airport too.

The only and last base Operating in PR is Fort Buchanan and army post.

Electricity in PR will not be available until the entire infrastructure is rebuilt from the ground up.



edit on 28-9-2017 by marg6043 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: ElectricUniverse


Today I heard in the Spanish channel Univision that authorities expect all of Puerto Rico to be without electricity/power for 6 months to a year.


I find that very hard to believe.



ZERO SOLAR In storage on the entire island??



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: prevenge
ZERO SOLAR In storage on the entire island??


To be fair most places have ZERO battery storage. Its a heck of an upfront cost at this stage. I was talking about deployable solar panels to run wells not really running the whole grid.



posted on Sep, 28 2017 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043

And yes PR only have one airport too.



They do have several airports but Im assuming your referring too ones that can handle larger aircraft. Since the power generation is devastated, it would be much much better for PR to develop wind and solar to increase their independence. Smaller grids impact fewer people. We installed solar 4 years ago and it is liberating to NOT be beholden to a utility to turn the lights on.

I'm much more concerned by the lack of water and devastation to the agriculture. My other island I love should be paying attention. Hello Hawaii im talking about you



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

According to jimstone who had a night time pic of the place on the article, this story is completely false.



posted on Sep, 29 2017 @ 11:46 AM
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Well, maybe I spoke too soon about praising Trump for doing something. He hinted today that he doesn't think Puerto Rico is worth the cost to rebuild.



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