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A question about hyper speed in space

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posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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Yea, I get my knowledge from movies and Star Trek. And I fully admit my knowledge is minimal. But when I try to think about "Warp" speed, in that a ship is moving really, really fast in space, I start to wonder about all the little bits of things floating around up there. All the rocks hurling towards something. How could you set up a destination, the vehicle start up, move really, really fast, and not have anything fly into an engine, or hit the windshield?

It kind of pisses me off, I can't travel 200 miles of interstate at the speed limit without a rock flying up and hitting my windshield. Why do you get a free pass in space?




posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: network dude

Silly.
Deflector fields are not just good for deflecting phaser blasts.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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because its a TV program so be pretty lame if they set off and hit a rock and the show ended



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: network dude

In the case of Star Trek, the deflector dish creates a navigational shield around the ship that blocks out micrometeorites and other debris as they travel.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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Well technically, the ship is stationary and space time is moving. So that means that there is a field around the craft and matter simply moves around it. This is a fictional/theoretical of course. a reply to: network dude



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: network dude
Yea, I get my knowledge from movies and Star Trek. And I fully admit my knowledge is minimal. But when I try to think about "Warp" speed, in that a ship is moving really, really fast in space, I start to wonder about all the little bits of things floating around up there. All the rocks hurling towards something. How could you set up a destination, the vehicle start up, move really, really fast, and not have anything fly into an engine, or hit the windshield?

It kind of pisses me off, I can't travel 200 miles of interstate at the speed limit without a rock flying up and hitting my windshield. Why do you get a free pass in space?


On the Star Trek style ships there was a "Deflector Beam" that took care of this issue.

Han Solo references the question in IV, but merely says that you don't want to hyper-jump into a star or asteroid field.

I'm thinking that SW Tech may be based around wormholes/Einstein-Rosen bridges where as ST was based more on altering space-time itself ... which interestingly enough, also has some basis in actual science (well, not in 1966 of course). MIguel Alcubierre.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: network dude
There is no free pass. Maybe there aren't that many rocks in deep space (outside of solar systems etc), but there are hydrogen atoms and they are what end up killing you via radiation when you travel near the speed of light:

Warp Speed Will Kill You

Edelstein's work showed that a starship traveling at just 99 percent of the speed of light would get a radiation dose from hydrogen of 61 sieverts per second, when just one tenth of that number of sieverts would deliver a fatal dose for humans. And that's not even the 99.999998 percent of light-speed necessary to make the journey to the center of the Milky Way in 10 years

At the higher speed, the human crew of a starship would experience something like getting struck by the high-energy proton beam from the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. On top of killing the crew, such powerful levels of energy would also likely destroy the starship electronics.
So 99% the speed of light will give you ten times a lethal dose of radiation, just from hydrogen, even if you don't hit any rocks. If you did hit a rock, well, it would probably be like a bomb exploded, when you calculate the effect of a rock hitting your space ship at 0.99c.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:03 PM
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I always thought they said "shields up!" just before an attack.
LOL, I actually was thinking our rockets would have some of the same issues with all the space junk we were cool enough to just toss out like the trash.

But thanks for the info. I'm glad bird strikes aren't an issue in space.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: network dude

There are several sets of shields, designed to protect the ship from all quarters. They are not all normally active, that would be a waste of power.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: network dude
There is no free pass. Maybe there aren't that many rocks in deep space (outside of solar systems etc), but there are hydrogen atoms and they are what end up killing you via radiation when you travel near the speed of light:

Warp Speed Will Kill You

Edelstein's work showed that a starship traveling at just 99 percent of the speed of light would get a radiation dose from hydrogen of 61 sieverts per second, when just one tenth of that number of sieverts would deliver a fatal dose for humans. And that's not even the 99.999998 percent of light-speed necessary to make the journey to the center of the Milky Way in 10 years

At the higher speed, the human crew of a starship would experience something like getting struck by the high-energy proton beam from the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. On top of killing the crew, such powerful levels of energy would also likely destroy the starship electronics.
So 99% the speed of light will give you ten times a lethal dose of radiation, just from hydrogen, even if you don't hit any rocks. If you did hit a rock, well, it would probably be like a bomb exploded, when you calculate the effect of a rock hitting your space ship at 0.99c.


thanks, you kind of put the whole "watch out for that tree" thing in perspective.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: network dude
I think that the biggest reason is the relative emptiness of space. Interstellar travel would mean not much to run into.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: theruthlessone
because its a TV program so be pretty lame if they set off and hit a rock and the show ended


Lame, but realistic. You would know if the main character was a no name guy in a red shirt.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: theruthlessone
because its a TV program so be pretty lame if they set off and hit a rock and the show ended


my god, is the bar set so low on ATS, that this is worth a thread?...sad


+6 more 
posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:11 PM
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originally posted by: jimmyx

originally posted by: theruthlessone
because its a TV program so be pretty lame if they set off and hit a rock and the show ended


my god, is the bar set so low on ATS, that this is worth a thread?...sad


I wrote it specifically so some pinhead would come in and complain about it instead of just moving along to something else.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

youre forgetting the shields also deflect radiation away too. And actually going to hyperspace would be a totally different set of hazards to worry about. Its space above normal space and normal rules need not apply.

B5 space is what i imagine hyperspace to be like. nothingness. Now Warping..thats different. As Phage said SPACE itself is moving. Its why in star trek scotty could use transwarp beaming. that was a variable.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: network dude

You don't get a free pass in space. You move via a null-mass field around your ship. Anything that completely enters that field becomes massless,as is the ship itself, will harmless bounce off of the hull without making a dent. This system must be very strong to handle the load of the mass that is being neutralized. On deep space craft the strength of that mass surrounding the ship would huge to protect the ship on all sides, especially toward the forward portion. It is not a deflector shield as Phage mentions, such would be insufficient to provide the all-sides protection.

That field is nothing more than a more intense field as produced that any UFO that gives every appearance of having no mass.

My signature line for several years tells it very simply.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: jimmyx

originally posted by: theruthlessone
because its a TV program so be pretty lame if they set off and hit a rock and the show ended


my god, is the bar set so low on ATS, that this is worth a thread?...sad


How does the USS Enterprise communicate with Earth or other vessels, when it's moving faster than the communications transmission?



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: network dude

Bird strikes are absolutely not an issue. It's the snakes you have to beware of.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:44 PM
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Air pressure in front of the ship creates a pocket of high pressure air that pushes debris around it.

Also, the hulls are really really really really really thick.

Sorry to use so much tech lingo.



posted on Sep, 18 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: network dude

Our current prospects for interstellar travel look like this:



...one rake after another.



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