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California introduces bill forcing presidential candidates to release taxes

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posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: MotherMayEye

The state web site says. You need a state issued ID card. If you apply by mail you need to show it when you go to vote.
To get a license or ID you need to prove you're legal. You need to prove who you are.



Yes, and what serves as an acceptable ID if none was shown at registration? A Voter Notification Card obtained by an ineligible voter who fraudulently registered to vote.

This has been covered ad nauseam in this thread: Link

I don't know if Trump has ever mentioned that, but I didn't need him to tell me. It's all public information.



edit on 9/17/2017 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

How easy is it to obtain fake IDs today?



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: MotherMayEye

How easy is it to obtain fake IDs today?


Well, an ineligible person could register to vote, in California, without providing a SS# or DL/ID#, and without showing identification. The state will assign them a voter ID# and mail them a Voter Notification Card.

They can then use that fraudulently obtained Voter Notification Card as acceptable ID the first time they go vote.

Voila. It's that easy.

Link, see page 2 in the pdf



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: MotherMayEye

How easy is it to obtain fake IDs today?


Well, an ineligible person could register to vote, in California, without providing a SS# or DL/ID#, and without showing identification. The state will assign them a voter ID# and mail them a Voter Notification Card.

They can then use that fraudulently obtained Voter Notification Card as acceptable ID the first time they go vote.

Voila. It's that easy.

Link, see page 2 in the pdf


Right.

However, my question to you is, for all states in which a "valid ID" is the standard to vote, how easy is it to fake that ID?



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

I haven't looked at every state's requirements but every one that I have looked at accepts a variety of types of ID...including certain types of mail.

So we aren't really talking about government-issued ID, here.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:53 AM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: Gryphon66

I haven't looked at every state's requirements but every one that I have looked at accepts a variety of types of ID...including certain types of mail.

So we aren't really talking about government-issued ID, here.


So, what are we talking about? If there is a big problem with the way CA registers voters and manages voting (apparently as compared with other States) what do you want to change?

How do we "fix" it?



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

I suggest every state adopts some kind of verification system for voters who do not provide a SS# or DL/ID#.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: Gryphon66

I suggest every state adopts some kind of verification system for voters who do not provide a SS# or DL/ID#.


I hear you, but's hard to see how that doesn't become a cycle of self-verifications.

Here's my solution. We utilize RFID technology (or something similar) we already have and insert an encrypted device into each person's body that constantly updates with unique personal coding.

Coupled with that, each person has a secured PIN that must accompany the primary ID by device.

Aside from that, any schema of presentation of ID is limited by the validity of the ID item itself.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: opecz

What is their justification for invading a person's right to privacy? Are they arguing that because he is attempting to influence public policy that we need to see his tax returns? If that is their argument then how about forcing all the Hollywood celebrities who run their mouths on how this country should be run release their tax returns?
In the linked article it says ... our research and reflection lead us to conclude that tax return disclosure laws ... comport fully with the US Constitution." Really? How is this law not a violation of a U.S. citizen's constitutionally protected right to privacy?



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:36 PM
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California introduces bill forcing presidential candidates to release taxes

How much a person makes/pays the IRS is no one's business other than the earner.

Your not entitled to invading someone elses privacy.

Feel free to continue pushing a fourth amendment violation.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: TheSemiSkeptic


6881. The Legislature finds and declares that the State of California has a strong interest in ensuring that its voters make informed, educated choices in the voting booth. To this end, the state has mandated that extensive amounts of information be provided to voters, including county and state voter information guides. The Legislature also finds and declares that a Presidential candidate’s income tax returns provide voters with essential information regarding the candidate’s potential conflicts of interest, business dealings, financial status, and charitable donations. The information in tax returns therefore helps voters to make a more informed decision.

leginfo.legislature.ca.gov...

As has been discussed, it could well be considered a violation of the Fourth Amendment. On the other hand, as has also been discussed, since being placed on the primary ballot is voluntary it is entirely possible to waive privacy rights concerning tax returns. You gave up ownership of the thoughts you post on ATS when you joined. See how it works?

Obviously, if the bill passes, it will be challenged in court.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: neo96




How much a person makes/pays the IRS is no one's business other than the earner.

But knowing where that money comes from might be a factor in determining if someone wants to vote for them for president.

There is no rule that a candidate has to have his name on the California primary ballot. Don't want to release your tax returns? Don't run in California. Simple.
edit on 9/17/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:38 PM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
How easy is it to obtain fake IDs today?


Still pretty easy and relatively cheap. Our friend's daughter got two for $100 when she was 18.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Phage




Right. But knowing where that money comes from might be a factor in determining if someone want to vote for them for president.


Who gives a RATS ARSE ?

Everyone already know where that money comes from.

Pacs,superpacs, and other special interest groups.

Personal wealth is no ones business.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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originally posted by: neo96

Personal wealth is no ones business.


Unless your name is Clinton.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: neo96




Pacs,superpacs, and other special interest groups.

That's election funding.



Personal wealth is no ones business.
Our president made a big deal about how rich he is.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Phage

From your source -


In order to get on the ballot in California, a candidate for president of the United States must meet a variety of complex, state-specific filing requirements and deadlines. These regulations, known as ballot access laws, determine whether a candidate or party will appear on an election ballot. These laws are set at the state level. A presidential candidate must prepare to meet ballot access requirements well in advance of primaries, caucuses and the general election. State lawmakers have developed these procedures in an effort to prevent non-serious candidates from appearing on the ballot; meanwhile, critics contend that stringent ballot access requirements discourage candidate and voter participation in the electoral process.


Since their primaries lead into the general I still think if a person doesnt submit their tax info for the primaries it will affect their name appearance on ballots for the general. Even more so since the law is aimed directly at Donald Trump.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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Can anyone show me the Constitutional guarantee that any given candidate will be on any State's Primary (or general) Ballot?



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

And the point is WHAT ?

How much money someone has doesn't even enter in to the election equation.

If that is suppose to be a metric for the illusion of choice.

Jealous haters shouldn't even be allowed to vote to begin with.



posted on Sep, 17 2017 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra




Since their primaries lead into the general

No. The primary selects a candidate to be voted for at the national convention by the delegates to that convention.

If someone loses the California primary they will still be on the general election ballot if they are nominated at the national convention. If someone is not on the California primary ballot and is nominated at the national convention they will be on the general election ballot.

If someone wins the California primary but loses at the national convention they will not be on the general election ballot.




edit on 9/17/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 9/17/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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