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Strange New Phenomenon. Wobbling Background in Videos. Possible Mandela Effect?

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posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:03 AM
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More and more people are noticing a strange instance on YouTube videos of a wobbling, liquid or plasmatic looking background behind persons speaking; but, the people themselves are not undergoing the same effect. This strangeness is obvious from the very beginning of the following two videos. There is no need to watch the entire videos; it happens from the beginning.





As you can see, the background is doing "trippy" movements but the people themselves do not seem affected by this "funhouse mirror" effect. Even with camera movement taken into account, the background movement is very unnatural looking.

The question is, how does this relate to the Mandela Effect?

First, the lady in the below video has insisted publicly that this "effect" was not a part of her video when she originally uploaded it. To see the most dramatic background movements, skip straight to the 4:25 mark.



It could be argued that it's some sort of malfunction in the webcam or camera phone recording equipment, but there are holes in that argument. The first one being that, again, the video-maker is adamant that the strange and very noticeable wobbling was not present after the initial upload. The second deals with the following video, showing it happening in an old black and white movie. The narrator here insists that he had just watched the same video a few weeks prior and the "liquid background" event was not happening; hence, an example of the Mandela Effect. Again, the movement is so bizarre and obvious that it would have been impossible not to notice previously. And also again, the people in the foreground are not affected by the movement. Jump to the 3:05 mark to see the most glaring examples:



So, what might be going on here? Is it CERN related? Is solid matter somehow being manipulated through processes that are transcending time? Is this a sign that what we think of as the reality around us is crumbing? Is "solidity" possibly being dissolved as we transition into higher densities?




posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:10 AM
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originally posted by: TombEscaper
More and more people are noticing a strange instance on YouTube videos of a wobbling, liquid or plasmatic looking background behind persons speaking; but, the people themselves are not undergoing the same effect....

So, what might be going on here? Is it CERN related? Is solid matter somehow being manipulated through processes that are transcending time? Is this a sign that what we think of as the reality around us is crumbing? Is "solidity" possibly being dissolved as we transition into higher densities?


I'd like to point out: the videos are wobbling, not matter or reality or anything, the video.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:13 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper

I suspect it is due to an AI type data reduction algorithm attempting to 'sharpen' and put hard moving edges to out of focus features.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:18 AM
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a reply to: Peeple


But that doesn't account for the fact that the people in the foreground are not wobbling in the same manner as the background. (And the background wobble itself is unnatural.)



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:19 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut


If that's the case (and I'm not dismissing it), it is failing miserably!



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:31 AM
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I think the cameras are trying to focus on things in the background that are moving, giving the wobbly effect. In the first video, watch the girl's feet and the rhythm of the wobble. Streets lights going by in the next.

Not a camera person, just something that stuck out.


+2 more 
posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:32 AM
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Nice post, but nothing strange IMO. It's auto-stabilization, where after making the video their phone / Youtube asks you "We detected your video is shaky. Do you want to stabilize this video?". To me it looks like a "subspace warp" which is quite an advanced technique. These can pick up on things like that woman's feet moving back and forth, that guy's gigantic beard, clouds passing in the car windows, etc, and tries to stabilize those areas even when these things are moving, and that particular area can have a knock-on effect across the whole image/background. I stabilize a lot of videos, you see this all the time. Try it for yourself, make a video of your mug then use the "Do you want to stabilize?" option and see what happens!
edit on 16-9-2017 by markymint because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:37 AM
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originally posted by: TombEscaper
The question is, how does this relate to the Mandela Effect?


There both promoted by people who lack any common sence.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 05:39 AM
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The Mandela Effect seems to be a coverall term to describe stupidity. Cameras on phones are trying to do too much processing that's all.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper

Explanations so far are autofocus, camera technology and human movements.

But no let's leap straight to time shifts and "solid matter transcending through time." You could rent your mind space by the hour. Default jumping to the least likely explanations sounds like a lot of fun. Life never boring eh.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 06:26 AM
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So, most of the comments so far blame camera stabilization or some artifact of using modern cameras. What then about the last video?



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: Iamonlyhuman

I'd like to see the original of the B&W show in case an internet whackadoodle is playing games for lulz. It's another idea to look at before we throw away reality and invoke time shifting studio sets.




posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 06:58 AM
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The second guy looks like a dwarf out of World or Warcraft




edit on 16-9-2017 by nOraKat because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper

Big girl on mattress with laptop
Elbow with hand gesticulates
Laptop wobbles
FIsheye lens creates wierd distortion
(Possibly) software algorithm adjusts position of face against background to correct wobble.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper




As you can see, the background is doing "trippy" movements but the people themselves do not seem affected by this "funhouse mirror" effect. Even with camera movement taken into account, the background movement is very unnatural looking.

The question is, how does this relate to the Mandela Effect?


But .. but ... why would you even go there...?

That is so, so random!

The obvious answer is that it is a technical issue, that, say, there there is something wrong with the way YouTube's answer to Adobe's 'de-wobbling' warp stabilizer algorithm interprets movement, but even if we had some reason to suspect it not to be a technical issue .. why then would you connect it to the mandela effect?

I do not remember Mandela as especially wobbly..



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 07:32 AM
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I've seen this in videos uploaded on youtube of TV shows and clips. I kind of just thought the video uploader added the effect to avoid copyright infringement.

Weird.
edit on 9/16/2017 by eXia7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 07:32 AM
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originally posted by: Iamonlyhuman
So, most of the comments so far blame camera stabilization or some artifact of using modern cameras. What then about the last video?


It is about image stabilization, not camera stabilization, and it is done during YouTube's video processing. As noted elsewhere, the wobbling is not there in the original recordings - it only happens once the video has been processed by YouTube.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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Well, who knows. I don't remember walls wobbling before this time line...





posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper

An issue caused by the cheap camera lens and camera movement.
No outside creatures or alternating universes involved.



posted on Sep, 16 2017 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: TombEscaper



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