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Suffering From An Autoimmune Disease?

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posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I also have fibro and this is completly true. Many drs still don't believe in its existence. Some believe it is a group of symptoms. The insurance companies also conveniently don't believe in it. It's a struggle for sure. I am with your friend - I wish I had a diagnosis that was more tangible but one thing is for sure, the suffering is very real.




posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Astrocyte

Now you have my attention. There was a Dr. Hamer from Germany many years ago that said almost exactly the same thing. He said that early-life trauma led to these "conditions". That would include all of the early onset diseases.

Then you have the Desert War Syndrome guys who got affected from the trauma of the war (or the depleted uranium exposure) that led to these 30 something year old vets getting none other than TYPE 1 DIabetes at a later age. I would suggest that if it wasn't the depleted uranium that it could have been the trauma that the war caused.

So how in the hell can I "know myself" if I have had one of these diseases my whole life. I have tried EVERYTHING I KNOW including hypnotherapists. NOTHING HAS GOTTEN RID OF IT!

Please share your secret, but only if it worked. I don't need my time wasted. I am so sick with the illness these last few days THAT I WANT TO DIE (and I'm not suicidal). I hope this thread helps me and others. Thanks for taking the time.

edit: the worst thing is I feel like an old man, and I am in my 30's. I can barely move, so I need to figure this out quickly, or just die in a rest home. IHATEBIGPHARMA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
edit on 9/13/2017 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: ANNED


and i believe the sarcoidosis is what caused my small fiber polyneuropathy.

FYI I have discovered that for neuropathy, small fiber type C are very sensitive to the smallest chemical imbalance in blood that would normally not affect a normal individual. Many food preservative seem to "trigger" a reaction. My latest find is that Phosphate food preservatives are very potent at upsetting these fibers.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

That's an interesting perspective. Many of us look at getting a debilitating illness as a curse. The reason we face these illnesses may be exactly the reason you described. It may very well be a way to strengthen our souls and help us focus on the things in this life and beyond that really matter.

In this life, humanity is tempted with materialistic wants, greed, power, and revenge. Being stricken with an illness, losing a loved one, and facing all the health problems that come with growing old, may be a process in which each individual human soul needs to experience. It's like the old saying..."We don't Appreciate What We Have Until it's Gone."
These emotional and physical experiences really drives a core lesson home.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

Yeah, but when is enough enough? There's no God(s) that have healed me. Believe me, I've asked since I was "the age of innocence" according to the teachings of religions. What did I do that was so bad to deserve this? I guess all the people that aren't sick are "blessed" and don't have any lessons to learn in this life?

What you're saying doesn't make sense to me. I have tried to do everything right, tried every herb, medicine, treatment that is available. I've tried every therapeutic so-called healing methods (that work even on the esoteric level). None have worked.

I believe that one day someone is going to rise up in this world that will cure the diseased. You probably won't know about this person, because they will keep a very low profile. I hope it happens that way. Time will tell.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 04:09 PM
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I am tagging on here because I was diagnosed with one of those conditions and I am interested in hearing what others do to treat them. The Innerwebs do not know what is wrong with me, but I can say when I had lost a lot of weight the symptoms eased off a bit, now that I am back to a heavier weight I am struggling with fatigue and pain again to the point I cannot run which was also helping, I also refuse to go back on painkillers and other pharms as they seemed to cause more side-affects then heal. Bit of a feedback loop...



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: CCKP72
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I also have fibro and this is completly true. Many drs still don't believe in its existence. Some believe it is a group of symptoms. The insurance companies also conveniently don't believe in it. It's a struggle for sure. I am with your friend - I wish I had a diagnosis that was more tangible but one thing is for sure, the suffering is very real.




I feel for you, it's horrific, watching my mate suffer is depressing, even worse there doesn't seem to be any solutions. Hopefully it is better understood in the near future and help becomes available.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

Overall there's a complex logic here; the generalities of what I've written are largely true; but there are many exemptions from the 'rules' that force a consideration of other variables in addition to those I mentioned.

Ego-stability, for instance, may play a big-role in protecting the self, which itself derives from relationships in the external environment. Positive relationships are constructive; coherent; and generative, and so, even if there exist entropy-inducing elements within the personality, the 'symmetry' producing engagements with external others stimulate/potentiate the systems resiliency so that disease can be warded off.

The post, of course, is theoretical, and entails 1) humility, and not a nit picking because of a dissociated insecurity with your own intelligence i.e. you only get upset, Buddha, because you don't understand what I've written. In which case, don't be a troll, and go star-seek elsewhere (implying that people who star your post, like you, are similarl identified with the same issue you experience, and thus, agree with your perspective).

More importantly, the more educated users here who understand modern science and the systems framework it is based upon probably recognize a kernel of truth in what I've written, but aren't sure about the rest. This is understandable. If space permitted, I would go into a more thorough analysis of how mind and body, psyche and materiality, link up; but suffice to say, mind IS your brain; neurological patterns encode psychological patterns, while at the same time derive their ontological properties (the patterns themselves) from the emergent interactions between human minds. That is, more basically, the ontological unit of 'self-state' (a particular state of experiencing self) derives from the ontological qualities of self-other interactions, as it relates to "being positively known by the other" (which is an example of symmetry; where another person's mind positively holds you i.e. makes room for you within its own processes).

Dissociation is such a severe disruption of psychological processes, that it more or less underlies any interaction in which one person doesn't understand another person; and so, and as Ken Wilber notes (within his color-coated system), when you understand the causal dynamics of reality, you understand that anger is almost always an inappropriate response that alludes more to a persons inability to articulate the complexities of a process in his mind, than what the person thinks when they express themselves in an angry mode (i.e. an expression of strength, power, etc).




edit on 13-9-2017 by Astrocyte because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: InFriNiTee

PM me for more information.

Processing trauma is not easy; and doesn't happen in a moment. EMDR, and other therapies based upon the premise of bilareral processing between the hemispheres, is way too inexact a method, but it is nevertheless a useful tool for processing trauma.

In short, your brain development encoded the meaning-interactions you had from birth onwards, so that your brain literally embodied meaning: it is a biosemiotic structure which encodes both qualitative interactions from the environment, as well as your own responses within your head to those interactions.

In other words, lots of transformation has happened, which is why the working through process tends to entail a thorough investment in psychotherapy, where all the details of your history/past is sysetamtically explored, and in the process, biosemiotically repaired.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: ANNED


and i believe the sarcoidosis is what caused my small fiber polyneuropathy.

FYI I have discovered that for neuropathy, small fiber type C are very sensitive to the smallest chemical imbalance in blood that would normally not affect a normal individual. Many food preservative seem to "trigger" a reaction. My latest find is that Phosphate food preservatives are very potent at upsetting these fibers.

for me its Aspartame. and Saccharin



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: Astrocyte
a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

Overall there's a complex logic here; the generalities of what I've written are largely true; but there are many exemptions from the 'rules' that force a consideration of other variables in addition to those I mentioned.

Ego-stability, for instance, may play a big-role in protecting the self, which itself derives from relationships in the external environment. Positive relationships are constructive; coherent; and generative, and so, even if there exist entropy-inducing elements within the personality, the 'symmetry' producing engagements with external others stimulate/potentiate the systems resiliency so that disease can be warded off.

The post, of course, is theoretical, and entails 1) humility, and not a nit picking because of a dissociated insecurity with your own intelligence i.e. you only get upset, Buddha, because you don't understand what I've written. In which case, don't be a troll, and go star-seek elsewhere (implying that people who star your post, like you, are similarl identified with the same issue you experience, and thus, agree with your perspective).

More importantly, the more educated users here who understand modern science and the systems framework it is based upon probably recognize a kernel of truth in what I've written, but aren't sure about the rest. This is understandable. If space permitted, I would go into a more thorough analysis of how mind and body, psyche and materiality, link up; but suffice to say, mind IS your brain; neurological patterns encode psychological patterns, while at the same time derive their ontological properties (the patterns themselves) from the emergent interactions between human minds. That is, more basically, the ontological unit of 'self-state' (a particular state of experiencing self) derives from the ontological qualities of self-other interactions, as it relates to "being positively known by the other" (which is an example of symmetry; where another person's mind positively holds you i.e. makes room for you within its own processes).

Dissociation is such a severe disruption of psychological processes, that it more or less underlies any interaction in which one person doesn't understand another person; and so, and as Ken Wilber notes (within his color-coated system), when you understand the causal dynamics of reality, you understand that anger is almost always an inappropriate response that alludes more to a persons inability to articulate the complexities of a process in his mind, than what the person thinks when they express themselves in an angry mode (i.e. an expression of strength, power, etc).





No sources, no links, just more of the same long-winded stuff you always post.

I'm gonna play my TL;DR card.

This shoulda been posted in philosophy, not medical forum.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 09:36 PM
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originally posted by: madmac5150
I have M.S. It sucks.

My M.S. completely changed my lifestyle... and I believe that I am all the better for it. M.S. has forced me to focus on the little day to day things; routines that most of us take for granted.

Physiologically, the disease can be brutal. Truth be told, I count myself as being lucky for having the relapsing-remitting variety of M.S... things could be worse.

The disease has humbled me. It has forced me to slow down, and look at things in a different perspective. I appreciate every small miracle.

I don't embrace my disease, but I am thankful for the insight that I have gained.



I am of the same opinion. My case isn't as severe as yours but it woke me up none the less.

I am very glad that I have the issue. I was able to correct about 90% of it by getting healthy and exercising again. When I occasionally relapse back to my bad habits, my body responds and punishes me within hours.

At this point in my life, I am very thankful for it.



posted on Sep, 13 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky

I ditched all western meds for the disease (they made me feel far worse than the M.S. did, and I barely functioned.)

I am now on a regimen of vitamin D and herbal meds. (PM me if you have questions about the herbal meds)

I function FAR better now. We have ducks, chickens, sheep and goats... I am still able to help with their upkeep. I can cut, split and stack firewood. I can drive. I only use my cane on very bad days. If you had seen what I was like 5 years ago, you would have thought me dead in a month.

I'm still here.




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