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Generation Z skips University in order to start their own business

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posted on Sep, 12 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: starwarsisreal

This is very good to hear.

People are very glum about the future due to automation. I've continued to assert that humanity will never lay back and allow our machines to "keep" us. That isn't how we work psychologically. People who don't have enough to do tend to unravel (a big reason I am against long term social benefits without an exchange of labor).

The only way into the future is through innovation. No one will save us. We have to save ourselves, or watch it unravel. And the only way to do this is continue creating and growing new markets. Preferrably extraterrestrial markets before too much longer, as there is a resource bottleneck looming on the horizon.


How many people have been "ringed" like pigeons with a time keeping device on their wrist? We are slaves to the time keeping machines ...




posted on Sep, 12 2017 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
a reply to: stormcell
Syntax of programming language can be mastered by clever monkey. Algorithmization is the key ...


I tried the university research route in the UK. Unfortunately, the competition for acadamic positions is so high, they pay half that of industry. Know anywhere looking for a researcher in computer graphics?



posted on Sep, 12 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

I'm out of CG for 6 years ... now we are looking for Linux admins ...



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

I'm skeptical of your assertion that generation Z is doing anything. Millennials are the people born between 1982 (graduated high school in 2000) to the people born in the year 2000. The youngest gen Z's are currently juniors and seniors in high school.

At the most you can claim that fewer are going to college directly out of high school, but considering you probably shouldn't even be attending college until you're 25 or so, and that none of genZ has become established in careers yet, you have nothing to base this on.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 12:47 PM
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This is going to be another one of those threads where I make a bunch of posts...


originally posted by: Sheye
E college is the way to go , in my opinion, for a variety of reasons ... convenience and quality of teaching being two of them.


Online classes lack a lot of the interaction, and a lot of the classroom discussion. It also makes forming study groups much more challenging, and basically locks out offices hours and tutoring.

Online classes aren't all bad, but they leave a lot to be desired.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: starwarsisreal
Most high paying jobs here are IT and movie industry and those jobs are very hard to get to.

For other jobs, you need a degree and plus you have to know people.


I disagree. The issue isn't that the jobs are hard to get (well, for IT... movies are different). It's that most of our graduates are under educated. The problem is that 120 credit hours quite simply isn't enough to properly teach someone what they need to know. Just look at what happened to us all due to Equifax the other day. Improperly trained IT personnel just created a severe risk of identity theft for 50% of Americans, all because they didn't know enough to hold the positions they were holding.

More indepth schooling would have fixed that.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: starwarsisreal
a reply to: Ohanka

Well what's your advice for me? I picked history as my major 2-3 years ago in University because I felt like I have passion for it and all other subjects don't appeal to me.

After reading that you learned more from studying outside University, I wonder if there are subjects that I would have passion for if I hadn't taken it in University.

It's too late for me to change majors though since I am about graduate and this is my last semester.

History though is better than the gender and Pan African studies majors they are offering.

Sadly history is being infiltrated by Radical Leftists. I read a book once where some historians are having issues studying Radical Islam because they are afraid of being called Islamophobe.


A friend of mine was a dual history/poly sci major. We would meet up for lunch every week or so. One of the topics that frequently came up, were that I was basically qualified for a good career where as his only real paths forward are grad school and teaching, or grad school and getting on at some think tank (very unlikely). History is an interesting subject, but it has few career prospects.

That doesn't mean you shouldn't follow it, but it's the sort of career that requires grad school and still has limited options after that.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Phage

And don't forget Michael Dell, Mark Zuckerberg, and Richard Branson.


These guys are the exceptions. They were bright enough that they didn't need college. Aside from Associates Degrees which actually lower your earnings potential, if you want to go into a field that requires skills, it's better to go to college.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
I did not need degree in any work position I ever had, but I'm really thankful to my father because he kicked me to university. My worldview expanded. I'm tech guy but I studied philosophy and it was big big plus in my life ... It is also free of tuition in my country ...

There is big but ... I was lucky to choose really good school, nothing was for free there in respect of study results, it was school, not money making machine ...


I'm tech also, and I absolutely needed that education.

I'm about to break the internet taboo and brag about intelligence. The truth is though, a lot of my classes I didn't need. I taught myself to read at age 3, I taught myself procedural computer programming (no books, no professors, just looking at code and reverse engineering how it worked) at age 14, I scored 99th percentile on every standardized test I've ever taken. Most of my college classes that I've taken have been the type where they give a high level theory and expect you to figure things out. For example, I was able to derive about 75% of my Calculus 1 class from a brief overview on the first day. As an undergrad I've been published twice even.

Despite this, and the fact that most of my professors have considered me very bright (albeit a bad student by my own admission... I don't do a lot of homework), I absolutely needed instruction in order to figure things out like object oriented programming, classes, and inheritance. I also needed instruction in order to figure out proper 3d modeling techniques for my art degree. And instruction in order to learn how to draw, I never would have understood concepts like gestures, line, and lighting without it.

No matter how bright you are, you need to be taught certain things, if you didn't... you would have already derived all of humanities collective knowledge in every field.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: starwarsisreal

Why not, when this young generation can easily go into 100 thousand dollars in debt for a college education. With no promise of a career upon graduation, they might as well take out a business loan for that amount of money and pursue a dream of many who want to own their own business!

I bet parents have been saying that to their college graduates across the country!


Take out $100,000 on an unused education and you still have the knowledge. Take out $100,000 on a failed business and you have nothing.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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There have always been people who didn't want to go to college. Perhaps it was to start their own business or just work in the trades which can pay really good money.

Now with so much news about people being in heavy debt after college and not being able to get jobs I can understand the next generation starting their own businesses and or just going to work. Perhaps you will see a new population at the junior colleges of young business people taking classes that they can use and not aiming for a degree

Colleges will have to take a hard look at why enrollment is dropping and perhaps it will lead to getting rid of so many silly classes and instead once again start teaching critical thinking and skills that one can use in the outside world..



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I wouldn't say that is true. The trades labor deficit is pretty real. You have a better chance at making money apprenticing as welder than getting a communication degree or probably even business degrees.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

You can't learn less. That mistake and the first fail is often what makes success.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
a reply to: stormcell
Syntax of programming language can be mastered by clever monkey. Algorithmization is the key ...


It depends on what you're doing. Most web programming for example totally skips data structures and algorithms. They skip even more if you go the quick and dirty route of boot camps.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:55 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell
I tried the university research route in the UK. Unfortunately, the competition for acadamic positions is so high, they pay half that of industry. Know anywhere looking for a researcher in computer graphics?


AAA game studios love graphics. Especially the ones where it's more economical to build their own engine than license one. This can also be true for mobile games where they have broad offerings rather than a single title, similar to how Zynga did it.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Aazadan

I wouldn't say that is true. The trades labor deficit is pretty real. You have a better chance at making money apprenticing as welder than getting a communication degree or probably even business degrees.


Communication leads nowhere. Business is the most over produced degree in the US and has one of the lowest returns.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Aazadan

You can't learn less. That mistake and the first fail is often what makes success.


So now you're taking out another loan, and likely not for $100,000 either because that's the first mistake right there... you can't pay yourself and have funding for your business for the first 5 years on just $100,000.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Sure but that is college. How about a lib arts degree. Most set of complete worldly knowledge yet earning potential less than welder.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I don't know how much you have done in the way of private business but it's not unheard of by any means. In fact you will find the largest success often comes from the risk. This is why people use venture capitalists and investors etc. Yeah if your taking out a 100k business loan without saleslined up its a huge risk.



posted on Sep, 15 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: Aazadan

Sure but that is college. How about a lib arts degree. Most set of complete worldly knowledge yet earning potential less than welder.


Again, that's why I think we need to decouple this concept of education from job training. And I'm saying this as someone who has 12 years of formal education in my field, and over 450 semester credit hours in college. I've got a unique perspective on this precisely because of how long I've been at it and I can see the BS for what it is. College should not be job training, it's a fundamental misunderstanding of how job training should work, that we've given that duty to colleges.

I want an educated populace, but job skills isn't an education. If we all had bachelors degrees and knew our fields, we would still all be completely unqualified to offer our opinions on geopolitics or fiscal policy for example which means we would be educated idiots still unable to properly self govern.

Liberal arts is great, but it's not a career path. It's worthy of study, but you still need something else to make a living off of.




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