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Building a Pole Barn Home

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posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:21 PM
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Looks and sounds super lovely!

I'm not sure I'd go pre manufactured kit on the ocean.

I hope the land has county sewerage and water!
I've found buying an old place and doing it up is cheaper than a new build
Gut it, make an open space, Add in some ocean facing weather resistant bi-fold windows for indoor/outdoor.
Lick of paint, new tiles, take off the ceiling, stain the rafters.
New and shmexy.

Sounds awesome, but I won't visit if you are doing barn pole dancing !
All the best living the dream

edit on 10-9-2017 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:21 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Hurricanes.. in Oregon?



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Trust me,I believe you when you say that you want a hidden room
behind a bookcase.
Seriously now,I think it's a great idea to build your own place and
I wish you all the luck in doing so.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

This is something that I would love to have built in the mountains.
I have a big house and I want to downsize to something like this.
kangaroomsystems.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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Hey, I am doing the same thing right now also.

Google image search hangar homes, and get some ideas. There are alot of functional designs that are open and set up industrial mancaves

Here's a good starting point, I've been meshing this style with contemporary hanager with loft.
Morton Residental

One big cost diff with these thing aside feom insulating is design.
Cost goes up much faster with large sqft.vs adding a second floor for your total sqft.
Not just in slab price, and extra roof sqft., but the truss prices. It takes a much heavier guage steel roof joist to make the spans across walls, so it's significantly cheaper to build up vs out for the extra sqft added.


edit on 9 by Mandroid7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: Bigburgh
a reply to: rickymouse

Hurricanes.. in Oregon?


He said it had an Ocean view. Oregon never gets high winds by the ocean? We had sixty mile per hour wind here and it tore apart some pole barns and took the metal off of a bunch of roofs including the Congress Bar in Ishpeming. That was a pretty strong storm. Doesn't oregon get Hurricanes or really strong winds by the ocean?

Edit..... checked it out, they get cyclones not hurricanes.
edit on 11-9-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 01:09 AM
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This is what I've been wanting to do for awhile now. As I recall some of those kits are terrible and you would be better off just hiring someone local for roughly the same cost. It's been awhile since I was all obsessed about it, so not sure if I'm right.

Love the idea of having a very open floor plan, but with bedrooms tucked in the back and a master bedroom on the second story. Then again if you're old or have mobility issues, slap the whole thing on one story.

I had the same idea about putting cabins on a piece of property for guests to stay in. I'm not real fond of large homes. Too much to clean, and I just don't see much reason for it unless you have a huge family. I'd also rather stay in a nice little cottage type deal at someone's place anyway. Little more privacy for everyone.

Really cool idea. I hope it works out for you!

What area are you wanting to build?



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: windword

Me, too-shippng containers are pretty much hurricane and tornado proof and so much less expensive if you do it right. I've found my land-talked to the city-just getting the funds/no mortgages. Plus, I'm not a cabin/rustic type-more contemporary and want mine somewhat custom.

Please let me know how it goes for you. I'm reading everything I can- pros and cons.
edit on 11-9-2017 by Justso because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 05:17 AM
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I have experience with Morton Buildings, and pole barns, seems a good product. Take a look at the link below.


mortonbuildings.com...



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 06:53 AM
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We're planning on something similar, sell the house in a few years when the mortgage is finished, buy land.

But I'm interested in joining 2 or 3 wooden yurts, with a sunroom/pool in the back.

Also like the look of having two domes. So a simple mobile home or shipping crate type house, because it could be two stories, though would prefer 1 now.

Want basement though.

In the yurt plan they could be 1 40 foot, 1300 square feet, with 2 smaller 20 foot one. And to me you'd get the plan and possibly work with a local log kit home company and price that versus the thinner walled kits you buy.

The geodesic domes have leakage problems and the joins would have to be reinforced with hemp crete, or cement.

i.pinimg.com...

This is how I see two yurst or domes connected in an attractive way with a little tower inbetween:

imgur.com...

In which case I'd join 2 40 foot ones, or larger together.
edit on 11-9-2017 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-9-2017 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe

I like the second one....more privacy form the outside world and all.....less windows to wash LOL


I agree with DToM on this one but will take it one step further and say no windows at all, the world is not ready to see you emerge from the shower.



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 07:15 AM
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Thanks for all the links!

Where we are on the northwest coast, we get lots of rain so durability is a must. So that has to be considered.



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Pole barn looks awesome for space and affordability, but with winds, I like this:
www.concretenetwork.com...

If you are in a safe spot as far as storms go, it would be perfect. Good luck and take lots of pictures to share.
And don't be like my buddy who built a secret room into his house, and then shows everyone who comes by. (it's supposed to be secret)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 08:14 AM
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Here are some things to consider when designing for cost savings.

Dimensional lumber is still the most cost effective way to frame a floor, which will limit you to around 18' max clear span with 2x12's. Once you get over 18' you start getting into floor trusses & the cost goes up quickly. I-joist are straight and nice to work with you but you won't gain much in clear span.

If you want exposed timbers for floor supports, you are limited to around 12' max, you'll need to add post/supports after that. Spanning over 12' with timbers gets quite expensive as the timber sizes must be very large to carry the weight.

Same for roof framing, dimensional lumber rafters & ridge board are most economical if you want cathedral ceilings, trusses next and then timber frame is most expensive. If you just want flat ceilings with an attic then trusses are the way to go.

Generally post frame is 8' on center, timber frame is 9' or 12' on center.

Timber frame is by far the most expensive, joinery takes a lot of labor and ISP's are expensive.

ICF's like Network Dude pointed out is well spent money, you could combine them with exposed timbers very easily.

If you do a concrete slab on the main floor I would spend the money & put in radiant tube heat, just keep in mind you'll still need ductwork for AC.

If your in a frost/freeze location and you do a slab for the main floor, you have to consider proper wall framing on post frame (for possible frost heave).

For sheer strength timber frame needs lots of bracing, post frame & stick frame do not require as much since they will have exterior sheathing to help with shear.

Of course these are very general & basic things to keep in mind, you can build about anything these days with the combination wood & steel.

Hope this helps!



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy


I know a person who built a pole barn for his home. One thing he did was put in in floor heating. Also put loft in it for an office. You have a lot of options. Turned out pretty neat. Build it big enough and you can hide your garage in your house.

www.hydronicheating.net...



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy


So we decided to buy some land with an ocean view and build our own home.


Why would you *not* do that anyway???


Land would be @ 80 to 100k.


How many acres, and *where* is this land? You said

Just a view, we're not talking beach front.
But how far from the ocean? I mean, it could be on the side of a mountain 50 miles away, or just a few miles, lol.

That said, I have no experience with this type of house, but the images you provided all look great. I like both pictures, and I also really like the interior of the other, especially the interior balconies.

Very few things as satisfying as building/designing/decorating your own home.




posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: Tarzan the apeman.
a reply to: DBCowboy


I know a person who built a pole barn for his home. One thing he did was put in in floor heating. Also put loft in it for an office. You have a lot of options. Turned out pretty neat. Build it big enough and you can hide your garage in your house.

www.hydronicheating.net...



Some friends of ours built a hanger-home. They actually have their Cessna 182 in their "livingroom".

So the idea stemmed from them originally.



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I knew someone in VA that also had a hangar home. Some friends worked inside of it for the guy but, I was disappointed I was unable to go.
I searched up some pole barn homes and the more modern designs are quite lovely. I love the tall roof and open common area design but, can see where heating/cooling could be an issue. One design had a skylight run the whole length of the ridge. That was very pretty and I suppose would help some with heating the area in the winter.
Good luck to you and the missus on your journey and I hope you post up some pictures either as you go or finished product.
(as you go would be totally cool!)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I wanted to go back and find the photo for you.

Some cool design elements in there IMO.
again!



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: TNMockingbird
a reply to: DBCowboy

I wanted to go back and find the photo for you.

Some cool design elements in there IMO.
again!


that open concept is what we're looking for!







 
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