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Building a Pole Barn Home

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posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:38 PM
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The past year we've been looking for a home to buy. Nothing has been a perfect fit. Compromise here, compromise there, and nothing was just right.

So we decided to buy some land with an ocean view and build our own home.

Now the fun part.

We're looking at an open floor plan and doing do with a pole barn kit. We'll add a couple of cabins attached to either side for the in-laws and children who will never leave (
)

I've talked to the credit union previously, so we're pre-approved already. Just looking at a different option and something we can customize because we're old and have special needs.



This way my bride can have the custom home of her dreams and never compromise. Plus I've always wanted a room hidden by a bookcase , the kind where there's a hidden lever and lots of booze and books and stuff.

I'll be talking to the bank in the coming weeks to look at properties, home plans, kits, contractors.

Just thought I'd chronicle my efforts and bring you all the joys of home building.

(I might even swing a hammer or a tool or something)

The pictures are just examples from different websites and brochures that we've been looking at.




With my father-in-law coming to live with us, our home-dynamics have changed. So instead of just buying larger, we thought to customize.

And the pole barn kits look cool.


Anyone have any experience with these? Any pitfalls or down-sides I need to be aware of?

Thanks for your time,

DBCowboy.




posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Got room for one more?




posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:47 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: DBCowboy

Got room for one more?





That's why we're building cabins on the sides.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:53 PM
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the cost of land alone would bankrupt most couples young work to consider this.

ocean front- pah!

I've been perusing a similar dream with less fairy tell funding for years and haven't cine close top what this thread implies.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy


I always thought it would be cool to make a house from shipping containers.

www.pinterest.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

We're old, so young couple we're aren't. our budget is 350K.

Land would be @ 80 to 100k.

The rest?

Figure construction and supplies and labor at 200/per square foot and it's in our range.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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I like the second one....more privacy form the outside world and all.....less windows to wash LOL

Sound like a great idea!!!!!!!!!!


Can I visit????



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: windword

I'll look into it.

Thanks.

Cost per foot for just framing and foundation and roof and walls for a pole barn kit is around 36/square foot.

But we'd contract out so we're look at 200/square foot.

Anything to lower the costs and increase our footprint would be awesome.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

You're always welcome.




posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

How close to the ocean are we talking about?



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: myselfaswell
a reply to: DBCowboy

How close to the ocean are we talking about?



Just a view, we're not talking beach front.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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Hell ya, just put a big overhead door in the back to park the Monster Truck in the living room.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Depending on how close that view is you may just want to consider the types of fasteners that you use etc, depending on on shore breeze etc. I've seen houses virtually rust to the ground further than 500m from the shore.

Stainless steel appliances are also a good idea if you're close.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Before you decide, you need to consider what your range of temperatures and wind will be.

Some idea of where you are building would be helpful.

Some buildings are just not suited for heavy snow or floods or high temps.

Your last pic as an example. Great in hotter climates, bloody hard to heat in winter. The upstairs will be too hot and downstairs will be decidedly chilly no matter how much heat you throw at it.

P



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy
Found this on ebay, looks nice, $46k.
link



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Hell of a presentation.
Had me at ocean view. Admittedly no Amish folks from PA are going to build this.. though it would last, but LACK THE WIFI I REQUIRE.. I dont ask for much. Wifi on.. wifi standby.

Man i hope you get what you dream good sir.😊



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:30 PM
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This site has a nice gallery....

www.kistlerbuildings.com...

If you are into building techniques, check out BBC's "Grand Designs" on Netflix, but you can hunt for more episodes.



Playlist link...?

www.youtube.com...
edit on 10-9-2017 by FlyingFox because: freedom



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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Seriously though there are a lot of options with a pole structure.

You could build a regular joist floor 3 ft off the ground for crawlspace to run all of your wiring, plumbing etc. There are joist hanging gas furnaces etc. You could make a small central sub floor area for utilities with a sump, concrete floor and blocks for the furnace water heater. Then even joist in a second story by using attic trusses over the whole thing or only partial. If you make it two stories like a regular house inside then you can zone heat it like a normal home. Like someone said, if you leave it wide open to the roof like that all the heat will be up there with the pigeons.

For exterior you can sheet it then use vinyl siding, you don't have to use metal skin which can corrode. If you go look at farm fields that have metal structures up that have been there 15 years the baked on painted finish looks dulled worn and aweful. It is perfectly suitable for utility and commercial buildings but it won't stay shiny new looking to keep a homes value in the long run.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:56 PM
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That first picture is so cute.

Ocean view to boot.

I can see high winds ripping the steel roofing off and pushing those walls over.

Maybe it would be better to put eight inch poured reinforced concrete walls up with a ceiling made with steel trusses and a poured concrete upstairs floor. Then stick up a rafter roof system tied at the bottom to the cement ceiling with concrete anchor bolts and run some cables on the rafters. If the roof blows off, you just have to add more sheetmetal. In case of a nuclear war, the downstairs would be your bunker. just have steel automatic lowering window covers you can close and one inch plexyglass window panes like on hockey ice arenas.

Have you heard about the hurricanes we have been having by the Oceans? If you live in florida, it will sink and make a good basement you can raise the roof on.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:12 PM
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Are you looking for a Post Frame or Timber Frame?

Most Post Frames will not have exposed lumber on the inside, Timber frame will. From your description & photo's it looks as though your looking for a hybrid setup.

As Tinfoil pointed out, there are almost endless options.

Here is a hybrid Timber Frame frame system with mechanical fasteners instead of joinery;

Conneticut Post & Frame

I've never used them but they do have pre-designed barns & will do custom design.



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