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Odd phenomena from Irma near Long Island and Exuma.

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posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:15 AM
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Although a rare meteorological phenomena, water recedes when the low pressure from a hurricane pushes down on the water and pulls it into the eye of the storm.

This is what also helps create the storm surge, Neely said.


www.ajc.com...

Stay safe out there everyone.
Mods I did a search and didn't find anything. If already posted feel free to remove.




posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:18 AM
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I thought that when the water gets sucked out like that, you head to higher ground in anticipation of a tsunami. Either way, that is a bit erie to see.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:25 AM
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Guess it's to do with the low pressure in the eye sucking in the surrounding water, which I believe is what causes the storm surge. Would imply the storm surge could be huge I would have thought.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:27 AM
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a reply to: evc1shop

When I seen the video I thought tsunami also. But did not hear anything mentioned on the various news networks about a tsunami.
I wonder how far back the water actually was.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Just about to make a thread about this as I just saw it on youtube and was like WTF moment. Bloody el.. that huricane is sure packing a load of water which is gona drop on Florida!

Wonder how long it'll take for the ocean to come back to the shore??



By the way, I think you should edit the title of your thread to something like 'Ocean gets sucked up by Hurricane Irma', you'll get loads more replies.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 05:46 AM
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How does it work when the water comes back in? Is it the same as a tsunami?

After seeing all the tsunami videos I would definetly be going the other way as fast as possible if i could see the sea receded like that



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

An atmospheric scientist who writes for the Washington Post offered some ideas. I've never seen anything like this either until this video. It's quite amazing.


Basically, Hurricane Irma is so strong and its pressure is so low, it’s sucking water from its surroundings into the core of the storm.

The wind on Long Island in the Bahamas is from the southeast to the northwest on Saturday. On the northwest side of the island, it would be blowing the water away from the shoreline.


It also may be experiencing the effects of what I call the hurricane “bulge.” In the center of the storm, where there is extreme low pressure, water is drawn upward. Low pressure is basically a sucking mechanism — it sucks the air into it, and when it’s really low, it can change the shape of the surface of the ocean. As the storm draws water toward the center, it gets pulled away from the surroundings.

www.washingtonpost.com... rm=.a6efe878f99d

Also just wondering if the video was taken near an area called Dean's Blue Hole? It's sort of a cove and shallow at some points and it would seem possible for the water to have been pulled around the corner for a time. I don't know, just thinking out loud.
edit on 10-9-2017 by TNMockingbird because: Dean's Blue Hole



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Wow


Small advice... RUN!

ETA
Ft Lauderdale cam

edit on 10/9/2017 by kloejen because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 07:54 AM
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Sea at Miami Beach being 'sucked away' by Hurricane Irma as water level drops by 3ft

Astonishing footage posted on social media shows how water levels have dropped as a result of the deadly storm in Florida after similar scenes in the devastated Bahamas

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posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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Here's the main Irma thread, for those who want to follow the storm
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:15 AM
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It amazes me how much wind those palm trees can take without breaking. Around here if there are high winds, the trees blow over and break. I looked at someone's post with a live cam. I guess Cam is the new word for camera, people are getting too lazy to type the whole word nowadays.

I wonder if the reason for that low water is related to there being two hurricanes in the area sucking up the water level.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:19 AM
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Ocean water is "vanishing" out of Key Largo now.


Video screen cap from Twitter/ABC
Source
Also, they are sharing Tampa is affected as well with this.

edit on 10-9-2017 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

I wonder if the reason for that low water is related to there being two hurricanes in the area sucking up the water level.

Very interesting hypothesis rickymouse.
The water came back the next day.


People who had seen the water recede in the Bahamas on Friday said the water returned the next day.


m.huffpost.com...

Image of water returned the next day below.



mobile.twitter.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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Canals are drained in Naples:



Source



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

What they are saying on the Weather Channel...is the winds are blowing offshore and pulling the water out with it.
Pretty sure I've heard of it happening on the Great Lakes during big storms.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: rickymouse

What they are saying on the Weather Channel...is the winds are blowing offshore and pulling the water out with it.
Pretty sure I've heard of it happening on the Great Lakes during big storms.


That would make sense if the storm were not rotating widdershins. I'm having trouble with that because it would seem that the storm surge would push water back in rather than suck it out...that the levels would rise rather than fall, no? Help me understand this, please.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: rickymouse

What they are saying on the Weather Channel...is the winds are blowing offshore and pulling the water out with it.
Pretty sure I've heard of it happening on the Great Lakes during big storms.


When a Huricane spins, it would have to draw the water up as a tornado does. It also could pull the surface tention energy off the top of the ocean, there is quite a bit of energy there. They try to explain how these things form but I think it is a very complex energy gathering technique. I feel they can pull energy out of the environment in multiple ways. The more energy in the water, the more it can tap and use to expand.

They are not alive, but they do gather energy if conditions are right, just like a living being.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 03:28 PM
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I'm more curious about how various forms of wildlife survive these conditions.
Many species are bottom dwellers like starfish who can't survive out of water long.
Do they just let go and float out with the water instead of clinging on?
What about the manatees?
Where are they now?
I would love to hear anything related to the above no matter how trivial.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
I'm more curious about how various forms of wildlife survive these conditions.
Many species are bottom dwellers like starfish who can't survive out of water long.
Do they just let go and float out with the water instead of clinging on?
What about the manatees?
Where are they now?
I would love to hear anything related to the above no matter how trivial.


Wildlife on land are used to hunkering down, such as birds.

Sea life, manatees, were being stranded, had to be rescued.




posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 03:07 AM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
I'm more curious about how various forms of wildlife survive these conditions.
Many species are bottom dwellers like starfish who can't survive out of water long.
Do they just let go and float out with the water instead of clinging on?
What about the manatees?
Where are they now?
I would love to hear anything related to the above no matter how trivial.


There's a video of two manatees that got beached. They were rescued.

Truly bizarre phenomenon.
A river in Tampa got drained as well. That has slowly began filling back up.



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