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Flooding will become worst. Ice Cap melts.

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posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: Yule C Mann

You are just... precious.

I doubt but do not claim it is impossible for all of the caps to melt. I do challenge being witness to this event in my life or anyone currently alive or about to be born for that matter.

I think assuming we change nothing its something like 5000 years for all of that ice to melt.... and If all of it melted sure coastal cities will be toast...

5000 years if nothing changes, assuming we are to blaim of course.




posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: WUNK22

No reason to rule out an Ice Age yet.

March 5, 2004:  Global warming could plunge North America and Western Europe into a deep freeze, possibly within only a few decades.
...
The thawing of sea ice covering the Arctic could disturb or even halt large currents in the Atlantic Ocean. Without the vast heat that these ocean currents deliver--comparable to the power generation of a million nuclear power plants--Europe's average temperature would likely drop 5 to 10°C (9 to 18°F), and parts of eastern North America would be chilled somewhat less.

A global ocean circulation between deep, colder water and warmer, surface water strongly influences regional climates around the world. Image courtesy Argonne National Laboratory.
...
Because saltwater is denser and heavier than freshwater, this "freshening"
of the North Atlantic would make the surface layers more buoyant. That's a problem because the surface water needs to sink to drive a primary ocean circulation pattern known as the "Great Ocean Conveyor." Sunken water flows south along the ocean floor toward the equator, while warm surface waters from tropical latitudes flow north to replace the water that sank, thus keeping the Conveyor slowly chugging along. An increase in freshwater could prevent this sinking of North Atlantic surface waters, slowing or stopping this circulation.

A Chilling Possibility

Has this possibility been ruled to be a non-possibility?

See also: The Myth of the 1970s Global Cooling Scientific Consensus

There was no scientific consensus in the 1970s that the Earth was headed into an imminent ice age. Indeed, the possibility of anthropogenic warming dominated the peer-reviewed literature even then.


edit on 9-9-2017 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Nobody is living on it, it just emerged as sea levels went down.



posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: makemap

What do you mean "worst"?

Are you not aware Antarctica used to be green and lush?
edit on 9-9-2017 by MysticPearl because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Vector99

Both?
nsidc.org...
phys.org...

No?

Explore further: Mass gains of Antarctic Ice Sheet greater than losses, NASA study reports

That's a link, from your link, that goes here and says

The extra snowfall that began 10,000 years ago has been slowly accumulating on the ice sheet and compacting into solid ice over millennia, thickening the ice in East Antarctica and the interior of West Antarctica by an average of 0.7 inches (1.7 centimeters) per year. This small thickening, sustained over thousands of years and spread over the vast expanse of these sectors of Antarctica, corresponds to a very large gain of ice - enough to outweigh the losses from fast-flowing glaciers in other parts of the continent and reduce global sea level rise.



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: Vector99

That's a link, from your link, that goes here and says
Yes, I know. And this is what the first link says about it:

"We then conducted different experiments, using similar assumptions made in the NASA study but found that in every experiment, mass loss from the west always exceeded gains in the east."

The researchers concluded that over the study period, 2003-2013, Antarctica, as a whole, has been contributing to sea level rise and that the gains in East Antarctica were around three times smaller than suggested in the 2015 study.

phys.org...



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: makemap


If you put a cube of ice in a glass of water, and the ice cube melts, does the water level increase/decrease/stay the same?



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: carewemust
Do you think the ice caps only consist of sea ice?

But what happens when there is less sea ice to reflect sunlight back into space?


edit on 9/10/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2017 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Phage
And Zwally still stands by his original report, but has said recently that in studying the last 2 years of data, increased melting in West Antarctica has placed the continent at a balance point.

I'll go with the guy that has direct access to NASA equipment.

“It’s a debate over the methodology, and their methodology is primitive,” Zwally says. “It’s what we were doing 15 years ago, but we’ve advanced beyond that state. We no longer have to guess at that density.”

Zwally still stands by his 2015 study, but in an interview last week, he said nature has recently changed the equation. His team is crunching numbers from the past two years, looking at ice melting and snowfall rates in Antarctica. And they found something startling.

The melt rates in West Antarctica just increased significantly. His calculations now show that the continent is in overall balance. The findings haven’t been peer reviewed yet, but he plans to present them at a science conference later this year.

blogs.discovermagazine.com... 2 years is hardly enough time to draw the conclusion that the melting will exceed the overall gain. If 10 years down the road the trend continues it may need further exploration, but 2 years can simply be considered 'weather'.

edit on 10-9-2017 by Vector99 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-9-2017 by Vector99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: makemap


If you put a cube of ice in a glass of water, and the ice cube melts, does the water level increase/decrease/stay the same?


I've seen ice cubes melt in a glass without water. It becomes half a glass of water. If you put ice cubes in a glass before water, you would have less water. You can't compare the Antarctica as a glass of water because the ice is on top of the water. This doesn't include the salt in the water. Plus during dinosaur age the lands were above water(they don't call it underground water for a reason). Before all the sinkholes started. So this doesn't include all the sinkholes and lands falling into the sea boosting the ocean up talk about human project disasters.



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