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OA-X experiment done at Holloman AFB, combat experiment may follow

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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:30 PM
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The USAF conducted some testing as an experiment to see if the light aircraft currently or nearly available would work for a low end A-10 like role for COIN or other lower intensity conflicts. The results were not released or potentially even really known as yet, but by January, the USAF will decide to do (or not) a combat experiment with some of the aircraft.

Yes, this could mean the Scorpion and others might end up being used in Afghanistan or Syria in combat as a test.

www.defensenews.com...




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Looks like WW II era/style aircraft with updated weapon systems.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 01:32 AM
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Going to be interesting to see what they do with them. They already know plenty about how well they work supporting smaller special operations units. Have to hate how they have a dog and pony show rather than just putting what's needed in the field as quickly as possible. Have to hemorrhage money somewhere.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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Next thing they will have airship blimps to do refueling and maybe even as floating runways. I think there was a DOS game that had that theme.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 01:03 PM
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Army is doing that..www.youtube.com...



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

It's an attempt to figure which aircraft fits the job better. The Scorpion has only recently done weapons release testing, and the other three are in limited use with a very small number of air forces.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

There isn't that much difference between most of the aircraft. This isn't reinventing the wheel which is what the chair force is trying to do. They (USAF) are buying time for whatever their real goal is.
edit on 8-9-2017 by Caughtlurking because: Grammar



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

The Air Force hasn't had a COIN platform in 20+ years. No one that's on active duty now has ever worked on one, they have no support system for one, or anything else. You don't just decide you're going to buy a type of platform that hasn't been around in that long and just go out and buy it.

There are significant differences between the aircraft. Their basic characteristics are similar, but avionics and other systems are quite a bit different.
edit on 9/8/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The DoD has paid for and operates a coin force in Afghanistan. It's probably the best thing the Afghans have going for them. There are plenty of countries operating them where case studies can be made. There is already training infrastructure in place for maintainers of the USAF T-6 fleet. The Air Force seems to have no issue maintain those 400+ aircraft. They don't want to spend the coin on these platforms no matter how good they are. That's what it comes down to.
edit on 8-9-2017 by Caughtlurking because: Grammar



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

The DoD isn't the Air Force. Many of the people that work on them are civilian contractors.

The T-6 has some differences than the AT-6 and is used for pilot training. The AT-6 has a more powerful engine, with 1100 shp more than the T-6, as well as EO sensors, and datalinks that the T-6 doesn't have.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: anzha

Looks like WW II era/style aircraft with updated weapon systems.


Which is what you need for these situations. The Skyraider is another example. Low, slow, ability to loiter and a resonable payload.



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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Interesting bit on the the competition. Apparently the USAF is excluding Special Forces requirements from the competition

aviationweek.com...



posted on Sep, 9 2017 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: FredT
Maybe because they have their own assets.They mostly rely on UAV,s and helos.



posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 03:02 AM
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This is the A-10 response to the OA-X! Are the A-10C's maintenance heavy?





posted on Sep, 11 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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Bring back the Spads I say...



posted on Sep, 19 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Sorry to resurrect but
at this response. The DoD is the air Force bub. Maintainers are mostly trained by contractors. The same ones that write the tech manuals usually actually. There is usually an NCO and a contractor in every classroom and workshop.



posted on Sep, 19 2017 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

The Air Force is under the DoD, but in this case, the two are different. The DoD hired civilian maintenance personnel to work on the aircraft, not Air Force personnel. The DoD hired them and employs them, not the Air Force.

Yes there are tech reps and civilian employees in all the shops. Some are DoD employees, some are Air Force. There really is a difference.



posted on Sep, 27 2017 @ 09:15 PM
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Under Combat Sent III, two AT-6s and two AT-29s are heading to a war zone. They're taking 70 pilots and maintenance personnel with them.

www.popularmechanics.com...



posted on Oct, 16 2017 @ 03:18 PM
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Interesting read on the test. Some people got their eyes watered.

www.airspacemag.com...



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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