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24 and being recommended a pacemaker

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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 02:42 AM
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a reply to: feedmemore

Are you super flexible? Long fingers? Any spine issues? If so Could be Marfans?




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 04:14 AM
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Sure sounds like low blood pressure to me,I'm 64 and still to this day if I stand up fast I'll pass out,been like that all my life,I was told why you start to get lightheaded start squeezing your stomach,to force blood towards brain,just be aware of your condition



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 04:27 AM
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OP: Get a second opinion. If the second opinion is the same, have the operation.

There is nothing more to be said on the matter. Act now.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:34 AM
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Thanks for all the responses guys it really helps to have other peoples opinions. The only reason Im waiting is because of how nervous and scared it all makes me. I just called my doc and have an appointment Monday so if she thinks I need one then thats what Im going to do. Hopefully I dont kick the bucket before then lol



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: Charlyboy

I really do have A LOT of the symptoms of Marfans but they checked for that. My aorda, spine and everything else looks fine they said so they ruled that out.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: Aeshma

Theyre not necessarily saying my life is in danger unless i pass out and wreck or something. All this has done is make me black out while I was walking around and it was was ONCE. Thats why im hesitant. If it was for sure life or death Id still be in the hospital having one put in today. However, they never even found of for sure why I blacked out. Thats why I want a second opinion.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: feedmemore

There is always a first time for everything.

It's a warning that something has become really "not right." How many times will it have to happen before you admit that something is really not right?

But honestly, I would think if I passed out and my face got shattered as a result after a long period of feeling faint frequently, I'd think that this was the next step following from that and start trying to figure out why it happened.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:35 AM
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The hospital has diagnosed you with an arrhythmia. Regardless of if the pauses in your heartbeat caused you to pass out or not the arrhythmia needs to be addressed because it can cause additional problems. Variations in heartbeat can result in the formation of clots which can then travel through your bloodstream and result in a stroke.

I know that you are young and you don't want to deal with the life modifications that come along with a pacemaker; however, ignoring this problem won't make it go away.

The cardiologist can order tests to see how significant the arrhythmia is (stress test, Holter monitor, etc...). Some heart rate issues can be treated with drugs.

For patients with a heart rate that is too fast the MD can prescribe a beta-blocker such as metoprolol or Toprol XL, which reduce the heart's workload and heart rate or calciumchannel blockers such as verapamil or Calan, which also reduces the heart rate.

For patients with a heart rate that is to slow (bradycardia) the MD can prescribe Atropine. If atropine doesn't work second-line drug therapy with drugs such as dopamine or epinephrine may be an option.

For severe cases a pacemaker (single chamber or dual chamber) or an internal cardiac defibrillator is indicated.


a reply to: feedmemore



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 10:19 AM
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Did they run a prolonged heart monitor test on you? It is a bit annoying but they hook up a cellphone like device to you with wires connected to your chest that monitor your heart 24/7 or as long as they are attached. If your heart was stopping or skipping beats this would pick it up.

I was involved in a shooting incident about 2 years ago and was feeling a little off (which turned out it was do to stress and anxiety which thankfully passed) and they gave me a stress test and hooked me up to one of those for a month just to be sure. All the results came back ok.

If they aren't sure. I would ask for them to do more testing. Get yourself to a good cardiologist to find out for sure. If they are certain you have to trust the results and do what is best for you.

Do you suffer from panic attacks?

edit on 7-9-2017 by DetectiveT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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I'm 49 years old and just had a pacemaker installed last November due to heart block. My heart was stopping for up to 7 seconds at a time, mostly while I was asleep. The procedure is quick, 30 minutes long. I was out of the hospital less than an hour after. You will have restrictions for 6 weeks after that in which you can't use your left arm for certain things(can't raise arm above shoulder height). After that life will be basically the same as before, hopefully without the passing out part.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Yeah Ive thought about that a lot too. I believe Im starting to accept living with with one because I believe that what its going to come to. Better safe than sorry. I just have to try to keep my anxiety at bay.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: ramuh

They said I have a heart block too. 6 seconds is what they found with me so theyre thinking i had a longer pause which caused me to bite the dust



posted on Sep, 8 2017 @ 12:16 AM
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You might have some type of nutritional imbalance. Most don't get enough magnesium. Magnesium helps relax the heart calcium helps with contraction. Because you have low blood pressure maybe you're not getting enough electrolytes like salt? I use Himalayan salt in place of regular salt because it has a lot of trace minerals also.

The pacemaker would be the last resort at 24 years of age unless they tell you exactly what's wrong and why this is the only way. Often they guess.

Maybe get advice from a more natural doctor instead of a regular MD.




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