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Lets talk about what's going on in the UK right now.

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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 02:55 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

I googled it.

Crumpets are made in a ring and thicker.

Piklets came from wales and were the poorer version for those without a ring and poured directly onto the pan and therefore a bit thinner and crispier accorting to the ever helpful internet.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

right and NONE of those are what we call buttermilk biscuits.. lol..

but you gave the best explanation ive ever heard.

you get double british points on that one.

now im wondering if the other lad was speaking about "hush puppies" not cornbread.. hush puppies because you throw them to a dog to hush them... similar to "doggie biscuits" which i guess are like dog cookies.... Those are lumps.. probably started as leftovers.. who knows anymore..

lol..

It just wasnt enough to have a tea party..
We royally screwed the language as well.
next you will tell me a screw is a nail and a duck is a quail?

so you have a bread tax and not a cake tax??

stop it with the mind games now..
Its too bloody confusing I tell you what.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:05 AM
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originally posted by: macpdm
a reply to: Reverbs

It is indeed very British but wait until you start watching The Avengers which actually is excellent. But the irony is Patrick Mcgoohan was born in Queens


Also starring the lovely Diana Rigg as Emma Peel, aka Olenna Tyrell (Game of Thrones) gameofthrones.wikia.com... aka James Bond's (first) wife Teresa di Vincenzo in One Her Majesty's Secret Service with George Lazenby www.imdb.com... aka Mother Courage (Mother Courage and Her Children, anti fascism play by Brecht) en.wikipedia.org..., aka Medea (Euripedes) www.nytimes.com...

Classy lady, not sure she needs poop pourri.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:15 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific
I haven't heard of that one, but the language is full of local variations.
I came across a "dialect atlas"of Britain in our school library, and one of the maps showed the different regional ways of describing the act of making tea in the pot, all the way from "brew" to "mash".



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:24 AM
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originally posted by: Reverbs
now im wondering if the other lad was speaking about "hush puppies" not cornbread..

I think the word he used was "cornflour". Now remember that "corn" is another word used differently. We don't have the American plant, and use "corn" as a generic name for cereal crops.
Our "cornflour" has the consistency of sticky dust, and is useful as a thickening agent for things like gravy and blancmange.
edit on 7-9-2017 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

corn starch??

white sticky dust used to thicken things and goes NO where near (american)biscuits..

Id just use a roux to thicken gravy and the like myself.

but thats a dirty french word.

if corn means "grain" why say corn flour as a distinction? like you have wheat flour.. so then you have "cereal flour" too? what made of oats?? I think you guys are confusing on purpose..




Internet says uk corn flour = us corn starch..

therefore NO.. That would be I have no idea what..

This is actually an enlightening thread. I had no idea biscuits from the american south were so mysterious. lol
edit on 7-9-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:39 AM
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a reply to: Reverbs

We say cornflour to differntiate between it and plain flour that you would use in baking.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 03:48 AM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: Reverbs

We say cornflour to differntiate between it and plain flour that you would use in baking.


its not flour though.. and why would the previous poster think it would be used in a baked good??

its not the same thing as flour..
its just the starchy bit of corn, not the whole kernel.

and of course no corn goes into biscuits..

you van make corn flour which would not be corn starch or wheat flour..

but apparently you guys have the "corn laws" which govern all grains so its all corn to you in a way?

monsters I say.

specifically nonspecific it seems.



no "cornflour" required haha..


edit on 7-9-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 04:27 AM
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It's more expensive to buy a pint in Surrey than in London now.. London is only 4.20 hehe..

I am too old to not go to sleep at night but I was drinkin with me mum.. had a wee bit too much..

I must leave for work soon.

I just want to go on holiday.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 04:44 AM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
We say cornflour to differntiate between it and plain flour that you would use in baking.

But what about the difference between plain flour and self-raising flour? Perhaps too much of a complication.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 04:50 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Self raising flour has baking powder added.

There's Strong flour for bread making.
Plain flour for general stuff, sauces etc.
Self raising for cakes.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:10 AM
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Trunk = boot
Hood = bonnet




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:47 AM
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There also seems to be a difference in the use of the word "momentarily".
The interval before an event, versus the duration of the event itself.
If an American says "John Smith will be President momentarily", the probable meaning is "The Inauguration ceremony will start any time now".
If a Briton says "John Smith will be President momentarily", the meaning is "He will become President soon, but his term of office will come to an end before you have time to blink".
If an American girl tells a British man that she will be his lover "momentarily", he will probably be more disappointed than he needs to be.



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