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Strange Moon Anomaly 2015

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posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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And yes, there was a total lunar eclipse on April the 4th 2015, 2 days after this video was filmed.

Total Lunar Eclipse April 4th 2015




posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: MarsIsRed

I saw the flapping motion as well but only under the one filter. I couldn't see it anywhere else.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 12:19 PM
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Its a by product of the cheap digital camera, the inability to make out the slight light changes and the motion of the camera, same as the camera not being able to track the shape of the moon properly. If you notice the leap of spots coincides with the sway of the camera but its slightly later because of the quality of the CCD.

Sorry, not birds, bats or lunar nasties


Just a cheap camera, fading light against the digital zoom which is artifact prone anyway (especially in fading light), mix them all together and the CCD can't handle it and does it own thing..

Just relooked and I think the artifact does indeed happen at the time it stops being optical focus and becomes digital zoom, hence you only see it then..

Those poundland camera's just don't cut it

edit on 6-9-2017 by Mclaneinc because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: Mclaneinc

Thanks for your input. The camera used was a Canon IXUS 125 HS 16.1 mega pixels. Not quite a "poundland camera" as you put it. But also not a particularly expensive one either. Its more than capable of producing very nice photos, but filming video as the light fades is probably one step too far.
edit on 6-9-2017 by Leeyum because: spelling error



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Leeyum

All due respect, I believe that the pound land footage would be quite suitable with that camera.

It's definitely interesting, none the less. If it isn't a lens effect or a bird, etc than let's hope whatever it is isn't leaving for the wrong reasons.

Not an expert but is there any software that the original file could be run through to try and get more out of it?



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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The moon was wobbling and changing shape as well, clearly looks like the camera was creating things that were not there. Neat still.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 01:19 PM
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I can see some thing just before it hits the moon.
then it bounces off broken up!
it was a Big meteor!

but Why do you only see it just before it hits?
you should see more of it arriving?

at the beginning of this post you get a lot of Bots.
they are out to destroy this site.
and it will not take much longer...



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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Congrats OP, I think you've caught something of genuine and very great interest here. In all honesty, you have to approach NASA with this video. They would be over the... well.

Taking this whole thing at face value, what you've captured is a meteorite impact at the lunar north pole region, probably on the far side of the moon.

The impactor becomes briefly visible as it looms toward the moon (just at the right of the lunar limb), wallops the moon, and the subsequent moments (i.e., to the left of the lunar limb) record an arc of ejecta from the impact. (It seems to me to fly up and then fall back toward the lunar surface).

These sorts of lunar events happen fairly often, but it is very rare indeed for the actual impact itself to be videoed. As far as I know, it has never happened, which is one reason NASA had to bomb the moon in 2009 to study the event.

Here's a video relating to another such impact around the same time as yours.



I repeat: If this is what it seems to be, you have filmed something unique. You need to approach NASA with this, because there is so much science that could be extracted from your film.

I don't know whether NASA pays for such things, but you ought to establish your intellectual property rights in this footage, because some home movies become so famous that they are forever linked to the camerman's name. Abraham Zapruder is the obvious example, and while I don't think this film is in that league of historic recordings, it is 100% something that could mean your name is remembered forever by selenologists and astronomers.

Again, sincere congratulations.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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Fiddled with it a little to try to stabilize it and boost the contrast.


Seems like something that large hitting the Moon would have a bigger and more lasting effect on both the Moon and the Earth. Dust, for one. Lots of dust.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Leeyum

so you're using 2015 technology to film something heavily illuminated in a heavily illuminated background with shakey cam with a light cloud mist, okay buddy.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Seems like something that large hitting the Moon would have a bigger and more lasting effect on both the Moon and the Earth. Dust, for one. Lots of dust.


The impact crater (to my eyes) would be on the far side of the moon, so effectively hidden from us.

My reading is that the ejecta plume was disproportionately reflective, making it look far bigger than it was. From the glimpse we get, it looks like the impactor was smaller than the amount of ejecta, which is immediately suspect. So reflectivity would explain that imbalance.

And what might be lurking below the lunar surface at the moon's north pole, that would reflect sunlight so brilliantly, and then mostly disappear (accounting for the lack of detected debris reaching Earth)?

Ice. We know it's there, but not the quantities. Which is why this film could be so extremely important.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: WhyDidIJoin

Look mate, this clip wasn't filmed to try catch some sort of anomaly in the sky. It was simply 1 of 50 or so short clips filmed to make a silly documentary for a bit of a laugh. I know its crappy footage, but it was never intended to be used for scientific analysis. I just happened to notice something odd, so I thought I would share it. Understand?



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: Leeyum

Take it to the experts. Don't get demoralised by talk forum argy-bargy. It's a waste of time, when you might have something only an expert can appreciate.

It's the difference between taking an old clock out to show to your drinking buddies, and taking it to an antique dealer for a valuation.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I like what you did with his gif! Its still one of the best takes I've seen.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: LightAssassin
a reply to: ADSE255

Astrologer? roflmao....

"It means that the coming Mars retrograde will improve your fortunes five fold"


haha I meant Astronomer



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: WhyDidIJoin
a reply to: Leeyum

so you're using 2015 technology to film something heavily illuminated in a heavily illuminated background with shakey cam with a light cloud mist, okay buddy.


I know you probably can't help it, but no need to be a kunt. Got it, sport?



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: audubon

Thanks for your comments. To be fair I wouldn't even know where to start with getting a professional to look at it.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:29 PM
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originally posted by: Leeyum
a reply to: audubon

Thanks for your comments. To be fair I wouldn't even know where to start with getting a professional to look at it.


You can submit information to NASA using this webform.

Or, if you're on Twitter, tweet to @NASA and/or @NASAJPL and ask for the individual contact details of the best person to take a look at them (this is the contact option I'd go for, myself).

You could send them your complete footage, or Blue Shifts excellent little gif. I guess at some stage they would want to examine the original recording, but that would come later.

Honestly - do it! Take that first step.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: audubon

Thanks for that! I'm not a Twitter user so i'll get in touch the old-school way.



posted on Sep, 6 2017 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: Leeyum

Cool!

Tell them as much as you can - don't just write a couple of lines and hope for the best.

Let us know how you get on - perhaps revive this thread or start another. This is extremely interesting.


edit on 6-9-2017 by audubon because: clarification



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