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Did we not learn??? US Navy???

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posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 09:34 PM
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Anyone whose spent time in the pacific waters(especially those surrounding Japan) is not surprised...

If you'd seen those sea lines you would be more likely to ask "how does this not happen every hour"

The US Navy is spectacular and you nor I know what happened but the Japanese collision was clearly a poorly trained crew out of the Philippines driving a ship [which dwarfs the titanic] in circles at night...

-Chris




posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

You said we're the best in the world. The only way to get that tag is to sail our ships. If we sail our ships, they're going to have accidents. People make mistakes, and things break. That doesn't mean that we aren't one of the best, it just means that people are involved.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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Lol, two entirely UNRELATED incidents -- Dude writes the entire Naval military off in its 238 year existence. Thanks for the laugh.
edit on 1-9-2017 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 09:57 PM
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Or...We know North Korea may pull a Down Periscope maneuver with a sub under a large vessel, starting from any or all directions and we are trying to get in close to see if we can detect them, and out of the many attempts . . . we got in way to close. We have no clue how many times we got close and didn't collide. Just a thought, why because I know we are better sailors then what we are seeing.
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 10:21 PM
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They all use the screw to steer?

So I take it we are all screwed?



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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Reliance on Technology is causing a lot of problems everywhere.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

heh.

Actually, the reason we call them that is because of how the first ones that were designed looked over 100 years ago: They were cone shaped with spiral blades on them, like a drill bit or a wood screw.

Of course now they all look like fan blades, because they work better shaped like that. But: tradition. Certain names stick and stay.

That's why it's a deck, not a floor. A bulkhead, not a wall. The overhead, not the ceiling. The passageway, not a hallway. The head, not the bathroom. It's line...NOT ROPE.

We do change some things: On a ship, the left side is Port and the right side is Starboard (easy to remember as there are 4 letters in LEFT and 4 in PORT). However, a very long time ago, Port was known as Larboard. As you can imagine, shouting Starboard or Larboard could get confusing during battle with the ships guns firing.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:29 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Ya I did. No excuse for a high tech military ship getting rammed by a commercial ship. Once!!!!! Multiplal times? Something isn't right. Stop playing the veterans card.

Denny



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: DaCook

Seventh Fleet operates more than any other fleet in the Navy. They are at sea more than others, and put off maintenance and training more than anyone else. It finally caught up to them.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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edit on 2-9-2017 by swimmer15 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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originally posted by: Christosterone
Anyone whose spent time in the pacific waters(especially those surrounding Japan) is not surprised...

If you'd seen those sea lines you would be more likely to ask "how does this not happen every hour"

The US Navy is spectacular and you nor I know what happened but the Japanese collision was clearly a poorly trained crew out of the Philippines driving a ship [which dwarfs the titanic] in circles at night...

-Chris


Chris

If we have no touch technology, why are we in accidents? There truely isn't something right here. How do our navy ships with all the hype ("to get to you, they have to go threw us!") not avoid a collision? Who is lying to who?

Denny



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I have a bunch of respect for you Zaph since almost everything you say about aviation is gold. What I am having issues with is that unlike aviation where things happen rapidly, with tankers not so much. While I understand that the rudders and other parts can leave the most sophisticated ship stranded, they should have radio communication, sirens, horns, people on watch, flares, and hopefully many other methods both sophisticated and primitive to making these issues more infrequent. Maybe you can shed some light on that ? I totally get murphys law, but also hope that our ships have ways to deal with it.
edit on 1-9-2017 by HanSolo31 because: error



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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You know, I don't know the truth of the matter with these two destroyers.

I also know that what I'm about to say isn't going to meet with a lot of approval. But I'm going to say it anyway.

I recently had occasion to hire someone who used to do maintenance on ICMB's for a technical position that included machine maintenance. One, at least a mere civilian like myself, might be forgiven for thinking anyone previously tasked with such an assignment would be cracker jack.

But this guy wasn't, not even close. And he's gone, back to the ranks of the unemployed. He was passed up by a woman who's experience was largely limited to the "hospitality" industry. She blew him away. He was a # up, incompetent and dishonest. Guess what guys, you have to be better than a waitress.

So what is someone like myself, a mere mortal who's never served, supposed to think? Is this just a one off? But these sorts of stories abound through the grapevine. They make the rounds among those of us that are tasked with getting results, so we're not inclined to make generalizations lightly. But we don't find a lot of disconfirmation.

What the hell is going on? "More money?" You sound like a bunch of teachers. Get your act together.
edit on 2-9-2017 by imwilliam because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I'm wondering that,

I'm sure some type of DDC control is wired from helm to steerage for rudder control, systems work really good when everything is working but when they go wrong what's "failsafe mode" and how fast can manual rudder control be effected.

Cost of platforms seems to allow for redundancy of some kind.

Betting in the old days they had a position manned just for this.



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: Phoenix

When in restricted maneuvering (The McCain should have been, the Fitz was not) all stations are manned fully, when there is a failure manual controls are as fast as it takes the OOD to decide to give the order.. regularly steaming I won't say but just know that's not the problem. As soon as trouble with controls would be discovered, manual controls would be manned. We can use hand pumps on hydraulics to bypass faulty controls, and the rudder can actually be turned by hand via very large wrench if all else failed.

The pretty confident that the failure, if there was one, was on the bridge. But it's hard to say without facts. The McCain was in the straights, and the Fitz in busy shipping lane within 40 miles off coast of Japan, lots of boat traffic.




edit on 2-9-2017 by swimmer15 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 12:12 AM
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I read a suggestion the US navy could have a bigger problem if the ships were having problems due to cyber hacking of certain systems. I can imagine the Chinese could be involved if that were the case. I have no idea if this is true or not.



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 01:03 AM
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If it wasn't a mines bigger than yours situation . But actually a break down ( we've all seen the TV shows ). Was this the first break down to leave ship floundering in the ocean . If not, just how many days out of year is this ship and others like it just bobbing around . After quick search , Seems quite a bit
edit on 2-9-2017 by MajorAce because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: HanSolo31

Fitzgerald was pure human error. The crew lost situational awareness.

McCain lost both primary and secondary steering, in busy waterways. Most likely they got distracted working the problem, in waterways that were some of the most crowded in the world, and before they could fix it, they were hit. They've only said the preliminary report though, so we don't have all the information yet.
edit on 9/2/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 04:09 AM
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originally posted by: abe froman
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

No armor plating is going to stand up to a quarter million tons or more hitting you broadside.

The law of the sea (rules of the road) are often trumped by the law of gross tonnage. I.e. Big ship runs over little ship.



posted on Sep, 2 2017 @ 04:17 AM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

You remind me of this...




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