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Nurse forcibly arrested for not allowing cop to draw blood of unconscious patient(Video)

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posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:34 AM
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originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Deaf Alien

Well she said she would not pursue a lawsuit against the police, if she was dismissed I'm sure she will be suing someone. Wrongful dismissal no doubt.
Maybe Kandinsky was right.

Someone will set up a GoFundMe for her even if she doesn't want it.

Lucky her.




posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien

She should get something..if she was let go I'm very shocked, there will be facilities lining up to have her I'm thinking.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:41 AM
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originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Deaf Alien

She should get something..if she was let go I'm very shocked, there will be facilities lining up to have her I'm thinking.

Agreed.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:50 AM
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Rigby police thank the nurse:

The crash victim The truck-driver victim of the crash was William Gray, a reserve officer with the police department in Rigby, Idaho, the department said in a statement Friday. He was working his regular job as a truck driver when a suspect fleeing from the Utah State Highway Patrol crossed into oncoming traffic and collided head-on with Gray's truck, Rigby police said.

The department said it learned of the incident with Wubbels on Thursday and was grateful for her actions.

"The Rigby Police Department would like to thank the nurse involved and hospital staff for standing firm, and protecting Officer Gray's rights as a patient and victim," it said. "Protecting the rights of others is truly a heroic act."

More at source

Goes on to mention Officer Gray, the victim, is not under any suspicion or wrong doing.
edit on 3-9-2017 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:53 AM
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posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:57 AM
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originally posted by: Ddrneville



The difference is one eats donuts.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:58 AM
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I do not care, ... what "authority" you think, you have. ...The Hospital "security" should've, "downed", this "cop".. I don't think, I need to explain myself. Any real, .."cop", would expect the same, "compliance". This "police officer" has, obviously, some "social issues",.. that needs addressed! He obviously, needs to go back to the, .."This is America school"! And "authority" is really "UnAmerican", to begin with. Authority is an honor, not a "title". I think/believe this "cop" needed to be taken "back by the dumpster " and reminded of his authority.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:18 AM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
You don't think you're a little too aggressively one sided? I get what you are saying, I really do but that's only part of the topic.

Yes and No. When I comment in threads like this one its usually to explain the legal / LEO side. I generally try not to second guess officer actions simply because the 20/20 hindsight we use wasnt available to the officer at the time it occurred. People take my position as support for an officers action when at times its furthest from being accurate.



originally posted by: Blaine91555
The law is one thing, how the people enforcing it act is another. They serve the public, they do not rule the public. When one starts getting it wrong in their head, it goes badly.

Sure - completely agree. With that said it becomes problematic when the public interferes in an investigation.



originally posted by: Blaine91555
No way did that nurse need arrested and any person of reasonable sensitivities, without an agenda would think the same IMO. All it takes is for an officer to lose control of their emotions once for bad things to happen.

Again I agree however on the flip side sometime those incidents are created by civilians and their emotions without the benefit of completely knowing the law.



originally posted by: Blaine91555
That officer acted like the nurse was blocking for a hard core criminal instead of a victim of something partly caused by the police.

General rule of thumb - You ask them, you tell them and if you still dont get anywhere you make them. All incidents deserve the right to be fully investigated regardless of how serious or non-serious the offense.

Partly caused by the police - absolutely, however it takes 2 to tango.




originally posted by: Blaine91555
What's your opinion of high speed pursuits in a city that has multiple helicopters to follow someone and not put the innocent at risk? Is that a factor? Could that be related to why the officer went too far?

Depends on the scenario. In some cases its safer to let a helicopter conduct the "pursuit" and in other cases its not an option.

In pursuits the 1st overriding concern is public safety. That has to be weighed against the crime committed. Police are liable for actions and consequences of pursuits. As an example we had an incident years ago where A fire truck was responding to a fire call. When they came upon an intersection, where they had a green light, they hit a car that failed to stop for their red light. Liability fell on the Fire unit since they failed to use caution at the intersection.

Operating a vehicle in an emergency mode (lights / sirens) grants the ability to ignore posted speed limits, traffic control devices, direction of travel on one way roads, highways etc. Now, because of that ability police have a higher standard they must follow to ensure public safety.

Each state has their own laws when it comes to liability for the person who fled from the police, resulting in the pursuit. Again that info is weighed based on totality of circumstances and a case by case basis. The case by vase basis came from a SCOTUS ruling.

The problem is people see law enforcement actions and then judge those actions in a blanket manner. Why did they take that action in this encounter when before they didnt.

i am not a fan of pursuits and feel they should be restricted to certain offense. Engaging in a high speed pursuit over expired tags is not worth it.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:20 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH

originally posted by: roadgravel

originally posted by: loam
a reply to: Bone75

Boom.


Wonder if his light bulb ever went on. He probably was thinking that the law never stopped him before.


Remember, every officer thinks that he is the law.



and every civilian thinks they know the law.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:28 AM
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a reply to: alphabetaone


wrong.

I am saying you and a few others are ignoring the 3rd factor that allows warrantless actions if they meet an exigent circumstance

Commercial truck drives fall into their own category and they do so knowingly. An example would be the restrictions on freedom of speech and 4th amendment protections in the military. Like commercial truck drivers they go in knowing they are agreeing to a standard that doesnt apply to civilians at large. Because of that standard and the fact a person is told about it up front its not a violation of the law.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: alphabetaone


wrong.

I am saying you and a few others are ignoring the 3rd factor that allows warrantless actions if they meet an exigent circumstance

Commercial truck drives fall into their own category and they do so knowingly. An example would be the restrictions on freedom of speech and 4th amendment protections in the military. Like commercial truck drivers they go in knowing they are agreeing to a standard that doesnt apply to civilians at large. Because of that standard and the fact a person is told about it up front its not a violation of the law.


If this has been brought up, forgive me: but is it not odd and fishy that this detective wanted so badly to have access to draw the blood himself????

Right, people?! He knew damn well he coukd get a sample another way. I think the real issue (well, one of them) is that for some reason, this cop needed to do this blood draw himself.

Wtf?



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

The detective is also a trained phlebotomist and is/was on their blood draw group. It makes chain of custody as well as maintaining training certifications easier to control to have law enforcement doing it. If the draw is challenged in court it would be the detective instead of hospital staff testifying.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 03:15 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Civilian? "Cops" ARE "civilians". They have no "Military" authority. Let alone, They have no "legal" obligation, "to protect and serve". My own son is a "cop". I know the "law" better than he does, even after his "cop/certification/indoctrination school". I'm still trying to figure out what "Constitution" he swore to "uphold and defend". If you think you ain't a "civilian"? You get a second thought, out of pity and a gentleman kind of honour. Now go forth! And collect revenue!



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 03:32 AM
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This Nurse is more of a hero than this "cop" will ever be. What part of.. "you need a warrant" did this "law enforcement" officer, not understand? ... Sounds like basic "civilian" knowledge to me. I'm not sure the "police", grasp the the limited "authority", they operate under. Sounds like some "public education" tax dollars, needs spent to make good public "servants".



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: murphy22

No that money will go to the pr department.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 05:37 AM
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General rule of thumb - You ask them, you tell them and if you still dont get anywhere you make them


And there's your problem...

Sometimes the law enforcers are wrong or mistaken. Given the power they can wield often makes it worse.

edit:

When it goes wrong, someone ends up shot in the back or chocked to death.
edit on 9/3/2017 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 05:50 AM
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originally posted by: Subsonic
As far as I'm concerned that cop is kidnapping her, he's completely outside the bounds of the law. The other witnesses there should have physically restrained him, made a citizens arrest, and charged him with assault and attempted kidnapping.


I can tell you if i was at that scene this officer would have had his soul pulled out of his body, squeezed and re-arranged.

Scum like this need to be scared to death, anything it takes to make them do the right thing.

The hospital staff and general public should have given him a serious beating and drawn HIS blood as clearly it is what he needs amd deserves.

What scares abd disgusts me the most is how few people have the guts to stop ANYONE like this, it does not matter if they are police or anyone else, this cop should have been knocked the F out and his moronic friends who were with them.

And putting the lives of everyone in the area in danger should get him jail time, but no that would be TOO righteous.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 06:24 AM
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originally posted by: Deaf Alien

originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Deaf Alien

Well she said she would not pursue a lawsuit against the police, if she was dismissed I'm sure she will be suing someone. Wrongful dismissal no doubt.
Maybe Kandinsky was right.

Someone will set up a GoFundMe for her even if she doesn't want it.

Lucky her.


I believe she has already retained an attorney. And I don't believe she will be dismissed because she was follow correct protocol, and contacting her superiors in charge.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 06:27 AM
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originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Deaf Alien

She should get something..if she was let go I'm very shocked, there will be facilities lining up to have her I'm thinking.


She wasn't let go, in fact the police department apologized to her as well as the mayor.

www.sltrib.com...



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Well i imagine they understand the basics of the law, whats right and wrong and all that jazz.

Tell you this that bastard Police sure don't understand common decency, respect for a member of the medical profession or even how to approach a delicate situation without ensuring chaos and violence reign supreme.

His superiors might wish to pull the halfwit aside and explain that you catch more flies with honey than vinegar and/or that intimidation and assault of a nurse for simply doing her job is rather beyond the scope of his powers.

Just a thought.



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