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Can the flood water safely be neutralized for saftey?

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posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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Is there some kind of neutralizing agent(s) that can be SAFELY placed in the flood water that will not harm the people, animal life and environment?

Maybe some types of packages that would act like large chlorine tablets strategically placed to flow with the potential harmful chemicals and biological wastes in the still and moving water.
Which then dries up when the water recedes, neutralizing any potential for air spore like release.

Any input welcome.

Good Luck TEXAS 💚

NAMASTE*******




posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:44 PM
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Like a giant Tampon?



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:47 PM
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You have heavy metals, volatile chemicals, carcinogens and sewage, raw and otherwise. A soup of likely quite toxic compounds. To answer you. No cure-all singular wonder cleaner.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: PlasticWizard


Like giant chlorine tabs.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

I'm reasonably sure any additive we might try would just make things worse.

I prefer that we avoid another Corexit strategy. Just sayin'



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 07:03 PM
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Run it through several carbon filters, reverse osmosis. Then a kangen machine. Test for impurities before drinking.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: Ophiuchus 13
Is there some kind of neutralizing agent(s) that can be SAFELY placed in the flood water that will not harm the people, animal life and environment?


No. The only solution to polluted water, is to add clean water.

Dilution is the only safe method of neutralizing pollutants.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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As of now feedback is there is no neutralzing agent(s)...
It would be wise to start making some for future events.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 08:33 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 08:46 PM
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It's called Nature and she's got this figured out. Of we can't control the flood, it's kinda stupid to think we can do much else.
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 09:15 PM
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originally posted by: SecretsoftheBlueApples
It's called Nature and she's got this figured out. Of we can't control the flood, it's kinda stupid to think we can do much else.
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13



There's nothing stupid about trying to help Mother Nature along in the clean up. The way you talk we should have just left all those oil spills for 'her' to clean up on her own? I think not.

I think this was a great question and I'm looking forward to hearing more.

peace



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: SecretsoftheBlueApples

Understood.

However now days since there are many unnatural movements or excavation and storage of minerals from below ground to above ground for commercial use, it does seem logical to prepare for unnatural events associated with natural disasters.
Events that normally would yes be natural, so not as much risk and exposure to mineral deposits hidden deep below coming up above ground from floods and or hurricane for example.
But since the mineral deposits are now unnaturally processed and stored above/mid ground, more risk is involved with natural disasters...



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 03:09 AM
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originally posted by: Ophiuchus 13
Is there some kind of neutralizing agent(s) that can be SAFELY placed in the flood water that will not harm the people, animal life and environment?

Maybe some types of packages that would act like large chlorine tablets strategically placed to flow with the potential harmful chemicals and biological wastes in the still and moving water.
Which then dries up when the water recedes, neutralizing any potential for air spore like release.

Any input welcome.

Good Luck TEXAS 💚

NAMASTE*******


No!

But let's keep up the magical thinking. Good Job.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

If a person has breathing issues, they may want to wear a particulate filter type of mask to avoid breathing dust and fungal spores after the flooded areas start drying up.

If a person has allergies, they may want to take an allergy medication ahead of time.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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Honestly with such a widespread affected area and how much time has passed there's not a whole lot you can really do. The oil is easy. Absorbent booms float and only absorb oil, not water. Place these across the major waterways exiting the affected area, if possible. The downside is that they don't really work well in fast flowing water.

As for the rest, well, Mother Nature and Father Time are the best environmental remediators there are. In the short term, as it's already been mentioned, "the solution to pollution is dilution." Lots and lots of clean fresh water.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy
Thank you



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: netwarrior
What about absorbent booms-sponges that are somehow set underwater that are filled with similar particulates filters as the mask to collect the heavy metals?
Place large industrial pumps in water and flush the water through the submerged particulate filter capture sponges. Then remove replace booms-sponges periodically...



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

then you'd have to push the volume of the entire conveyance (ditch/canal/creek/river w/e) through these filters, which would also do a very good job at impeding flow. Wouldn't work without re-flooding the area.

The reason why diesel fuel oil or gasoline is relatively "easy" is that it's lighter than water. It floats. You can just drop a floating boom and tether it at both ends and the natural flow of the water will push oil into it. The boom will absorb oil until it is saturated, but it will still contain most of the product. Once saturation is achieved you'll lose *a little* on the "clean" side due to seepage, but as long as the boom is changed promptly it'd get most of it. For added insurance, add an impermeable floating boom downstream to catch anything you missed.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: Ophiuchus 13
Is there some kind of neutralizing agent(s) that can be SAFELY placed in the flood water that will not harm the people, animal life and environment?

Maybe some types of packages that would act like large chlorine tablets strategically placed to flow with the potential harmful chemicals and biological wastes in the still and moving water.
Which then dries up when the water recedes, neutralizing any potential for air spore like release.


While it'd be nice, the short answer (as others have said) is "no."

There's a lot of logistical problems -- how to get it into the floodwaters which cover hundreds of square miles. Another issue is that the water isn't an even "carpet"... one area might contain a million gallons while another one the same size only contains half that. Plus, water is continually on the move - and it can move in unpredictable ways. It's also full of things (trees, etc) that any kind of mechanical cleaner would get caught on.

Different areas will have different pollutants (including overflow from sewage tanks) - AND they have new problems from overflowing toilets and so forth that are continuing to happen as the waters go away.

The aftermath (rotting things (trees, etc) and garbage) is going to be a real mess.



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