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Found a Baby Turtle Today...

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posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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Ok, so I walk outside today and find this little guy hanging out on my doorstep. Not in the yard or the driveway, he was literally standing on my porch looking up at me as I stepped outside. I stared back at him for a minute and then did what any normal person would do at that point...picked him up, gave him a name (Snappy), and started to read how to care for a turtle articles. He is quite tiny as hopefully you can tell by the pic. His shell is still soft and he was covered with dirt. A snapper turtle, which was just recently born I believe...


Many, if not most, nests are ransacked by predators. Those eggs that survive will hatch in late summer, and the temperature at which they were incubated determines the sex of the hatchlings. Baby snapping turtles are about one inch long at hatching, with tails about the same length. Depending on the group, the babies will either emerge within a few days and head straight for water or remain in their nest through the winter. Once hatchlings reach water, they stay in the shallows clinging to underwater vegetation until they become stronger swimmers. ...


Already a proven survivor, as he was well away from his natural habitat and I am assuming he survived an attack from a cat, bird, or some other similar animal. Or, as the link above states, his mom could've buried her eggs that far away from the river, but it is quite a distance for him to travel so I'm not so sure that is the case.


Snapping turtle eggs and babies are extremely vulnerable to predation. Skunks, foxes, raccoons, and mink frequently raid nests and eat eggs. Hatchlings are also eaten by a variety of predators, including herons, hawks, alligators, large fish, raccoons, snakes, and larger turtles.


So, right now, I have him in a container of water with rocks and I'm looking for any suggestions as to whether I can/should keep him or if have to send him to his certain doom by releasing him back into the wild. Most of the turtle hatchlings don't survive the journey to the water or even the first few weeks of life. I've read up some on how to care for a turtle, what they eat and how to build the proper habitat for them to live in. (which I will do if I decide it is ok to keep him or not) But, I am unsure what is the right thing to do. Keep him or release him.




When a snapping turtle is a baby, it is very cute and hard to resist. However, they tend to get really large (up to 18 inches long and 86 pounds heavy!) and can be destructive or unhappy if placed in the wrong environment. The fact that they often live from 20 to 50 years (and can live more than 100 years) if cared for right can be kind of scary to some people. Having a snapping turtle is quite a commitment, so think seriously before deciding if you want to keep one of these reptiles ...


I really would like to keep him at least for a few days or weeks and then let him back into the wild, but I don't know if that is the proper thing to do either. Honestly, I just want to do what is best for him as well as ensure he survives...how difficult is it to care for them and how long can I keep him before it causes him not to be able to survive in the wild?

Thanks,
blend57




posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: blend57

Keep him.
My son has a pet turtle and he and his girlfriend love theirs.

#FreeDBCowboy



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: blend57

I love turtles.

I had a pet turtle as a child. I named it Michael (short for Michelangelo - the ninja turtle) lol.

I don't remember much, but I do remember playing with him all the time and feeding it.

If I remember correctly, turtles are very little maintenance so you can probably keep him for awhile and figure out what to do with him in the future.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: blend57
Similar story and what she learned along the way.

pethelpful.com...



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: blend57


Ummm...cool...a snapping turtle...

When I was a child we moved into a house out in the country...This house had allot of flower beds and ancient Willow trees...I remember the day we moved there...it was one of those sultry summer days when the cicadas were singing...
My brothers and sisters and I were doing what any children would...trying to stay out from underfoot and out from having to work...

Children...busy playing...while Mom called across the yard for us to...stay out of those flower gardens...which was where we decided to explore...As the sun followed it's arc across the sky and the lemonade glasses emptied...one of my sisters screams...
Such a bloodcurdling shriek...we all froze...there was my younger sister shaking like a leaf...pointing into one of the gardens...Suddenly a patch of irises started moving...a slow up and down bob...out of the bed lurched the biggest snapping turtle we had ever seen...We never knew how long it lay buried there in the garden but it had a layer of soil and irises on it's shell...

We just stared...marveled...and eventually laughed as that monstrous turtle waddled across the road and off towards the stream that ran past the field...


True story that...





YouSir



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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Imo if you want to keep it go for it. Keep in mind snapping turtles are mean though and get very big. Just don't let kids play with it and you'll be fine i imagine.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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I'm always for releasing critters back to their freedom IF they can be released without dooming them.

I'd think a turtle would be fine once big enough to fend for itself... though I'd take care not to let the little guy get too comfy with people as Snappers can get huge and I knew a guy who knew a guy who lost his pinky tip to one. A huge turtle with no fear of people could be a start to an urban (or country) legend, I'd think.
edit on 8/31/2017 by Baddogma because: typo



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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My kids painted acrylics on the back of one in our yard, we saw him a year or so later and he still had a little paint on the rim... and he was considerably bigger.

Pack him a lunch and put him under a bush far away from roads!

Dont be this guy:



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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I believe that is not a common snapper but an alligator snapper(loggerhead) judging by the klingon like ridges.

The common snapper is more aggressive. Check out that snap at 2:30 in vid.
The alligator snapper gets 2 feet long and can way over 200 pounds. They are not endangered but declining in numbers. Some states outlaw possession, so better check local laws. I'd let it go after a brief period.
They live 80-120 years in the wild and 20-80 in captivity. Wow, that's a lot o years!
Cool find nevertheless and one of nature's solid designs from prehistoric era.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Butterfinger


Pack him a lunch and put him under a bush far away from roads! Dont be this guy:

I would normally, but he is too little. Maybe an inch or so in size. Definitely would not be "that guy" in the vid...lol. Thanks for the laugh!

a reply to: Baddogma



I'm always for releasing critters back to their freedom IF they can be released without dooming them. I'd think a turtle would be fine once big enough to fend for itself...

That is really my only concern. I mean, he possibly survived a predator attack already...it would be very sad if I released him only to have him not survive the next one.

a reply to: YouSir


Such a bloodcurdling shriek...we all froze...there was my younger sister shaking like a leaf...pointing into one of the gardens...Suddenly a patch of irises started moving...a slow up and down bob...out of the bed lurched the biggest snapping turtle we had ever seen...We never knew how long it lay buried there in the garden but it had a layer of soil and irises on it's shell...


That is a funny story. I've had similar encounters with turtles. The ones I've seen were near full grown though. I've rescued a few from the wheels of passing cars as they try to cross the road. I've never had one hanging out on my porch though. Raccoons, yes..turtles, no. Thanks for the story!

a reply to: SeaWorthy


Similar story and what she learned along the way.

pethelpful.com
I am fearful of keeping him too long and domesticating him. Also, the other points in there that were made such as natural immunity, and giving other turtles diseases. Although I am not so sure that would all happen, I can see the danger of it happening.

I also would not want to feed it food pellets and try to maintain a diet for him as close to his natural one as possible. I don't think it is good to feed them "pet food" then try to wean them off it eventually. If you are planning on releasing them back into the wild, for me that means to try and keep their habitat and food as close as you can to whatever that is.

That article did teach me a few things with regards to the water I should be using for his tank and using algae and natural habitat plants for him to eat as well. So, it was a good read and I appreciate the link!

a reply to: knowledgehunter0986


I had a pet turtle as a child. I named it Michael (short for Michelangelo - the ninja turtle) lol.


I was told to name mine Raphael, after a Ninja turtle as well. But I had already chosen Snappy. lol. They don't seem like too much work, but I still want to make sure I don't keep him too long. Thanks for the comment/thoughts!

a reply to: IAMTAT


Keep him. My son has a pet turtle and he and his girlfriend love theirs.


I think I will for a few weeks, but not forever. I love turtles too, but I think they are most beautiful in their natural habitat. That's just my opinion though, nothing wrong with having them for a pet at all. Thank you!

a reply to: waftist


I believe that is not a common snapper but an alligator snapper(loggerhead) judging by the klingon like ridges.


Very well could be and thank you for the link/video. I thought it was pretty cool to have him sitting on my doorstep as well. The outlaw of possession I will have to check out. But after reading a bit, I think it is best to just keep him until he's a bit bigger and release him then. So, he will not be a pet for me, but I do want to give him a fighting chance if at all possible.

Thanks to everyone for the thoughts and responses. I guess I need to start looking for a small tank and such. Also, I'm not sure if I should use the river water/rocks/dirt to fill it up with? Or just gradually introduce it into the water I am using now. I don't know which is best. The river water at first or regular water at first. Another area I need to look into...

Thanks again!
blend




edit on 31-8-2017 by blend57 because: Always an edit! : /



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: blend57

1 inch, wow, I did not know! Yea, it will probably benefit from your caretaking fer a while.
Ran across this site on how to care for them.
Best wishes and glad to hear you plan on releasing it later.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 03:00 PM
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I say use it as a learning experience. If you think you can provide for him through the winter (especially if you live in a colder environment), give him a terrarium and a vital jumpstart his year mates won't receive. But I'd let him go in the spring. It's not like you'll compromise his instincts. Reptiles never truly domesticate.

He'll be bigger and stronger by then, but shouldn't get so large that you won't be able to handle him.

But snappers don't make very good pets. They're meaner than dirt and can get big enough to remove the fingers of the unwary.

He ought to stay pretty cute through the winter though. He'll still be able to bite you pretty bad if you don't pay attention to what you're doing.

It's how I learned about snakes. I did the same thing with a baby rat snake.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 03:03 PM
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You did the right thing by not only rescuing him from danger, but doing the necessary research on his care. You can keep him for a while and then release him. I have a red eared slider turtle and love him. You could always get an aquatic turtle in a pet shop after you release the snapper and you will have many years of joy.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: blend57

They're salmonella carriers, so wash your hands after touching. Also, their aquariums get pretty dirty pretty quickly. Lastly, a healthy well fed snapper can grow very large. But I say go ahead and keep the thing.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: TobyFlenderson

A filtered tank is best with a dock the turtle can get up on. I would not keep a snapper as a pet, only for a while until he can be released back into the wild safely.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: Butterfinger

OMG - I can't believe someone was stupid enough to throw a gopher turtle in a lake!!

That is what comes of kids being raised indoors, 'hooked on' tv and video games instead of being sent outside to play once in a while!



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 04:22 PM
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Eat 'im!


Or, I guess you could also teach him the ways of the Jedi.

Kinda neat circumstances around it. Just watch out, they can get genuinely big and their bite is no joke.



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: blend57

Quickly go back and see if you can find three more and a rat
I think they have a higher purpose

I suggest investing in a pizza shop as well....


Cowabu...never mind



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 09:01 PM
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originally posted by: blend57
Keep him or release him?

What good would come from you keeping it? Can you let it go once you achieved that?

There's no way I'd keep a reptile in my home. They're pretty dirty. The one you're talking about cannot be domesticated and is quite a dangerous animal.



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