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Star Removes Self from Galaxy

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posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 12:59 PM
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Outcast Star Zooms Out of Milky Way Galaxy

Tue Feb 8, 4:51 PM ET Science - Reuters
By Deborah Zabarenko

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An outcast star is zooming out of the Milky Way, the first ever seen escaping the galaxy, astronomers reported on Tuesday.

The star is heading for the emptiness of intergalactic space after being ejected from the heart of the Milky Way following a close encounter with a black hole, said Warren Brown, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.


today.reuters.com...


www.cfa.harvard.edu...




posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 02:31 PM
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Total cool immange if earth was a planet of that star the only way to travel.


E_T

posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 03:49 PM
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Wrong title... it's not the star which is removing self from galaxy... it has been "kicked" out.



www.space.com...



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 08:04 AM
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WELL I NEVER!!!!!!...........................fancy that!!!!....this sort of stuff just amazes me,would some one please tell me how they know that the star is made up of mainly metals as it states in your link E-T?

thanks.



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by optimus fettwould some one please tell me how they know that the star is made up of mainly metals as it states in your link E-T?


They can determine the composition of a star through spectral analysis of the star's light.



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 08:26 AM
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Spectrographic analysis (where there are gaps in the light spectrum) along with knowing the stars velocity allow us to know the components of a star. As a material burns, it gives off a distinct and unique light signature. There will be gaps in the white light given off at places. By analyzing these, you can know what substances can be burned. The difficulty comes with the red shift. As things move away from us, the light waves are more spread out. A real world example of this is as a car drives by. The tone changes as it comes nearer and draws away. While it's coming near you, the waves are condensed, and as it pulls away they're more spread out (from the perspective of a stationary observer). The person in the car always hears the same tone, tho.

Same thing happens with light, so the spectrum is usually shifted towards the red, but sometimes shifted towards the blue side of visible ligh. This is why the velocity is important.

Taking these two elements and a little time, observers can determine the elemental contents of a star. In a neuclear reaction, everything burns (we think), so it gives a signature of all its contents and how much there is.



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 08:51 AM
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How do you have a close encounter with a Black? I read the same article when it came out. I thought nothing could escape the power of a Black Hole.


E_T

posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by Event Horizon
How do you have a close encounter with a Black? I read the same article when it came out. I thought nothing could escape the power of a Black Hole.
Only if matter falls to event horizon, after that escape velocity exceeds speed of light. (forgot to find out what your nick means?)
But going that close isn't mandatory, for example gravity slingshot effect requires only that object (probe, meteoroid, planet, star...) goes close enough to be affected by gravity of moving more massive object.

en.wikipedia.org...



Here's how spectroscopy works.
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by Event Horizon
How do you have a close encounter with a Black? I read the same article when it came out. I thought nothing could escape the power of a Black Hole.


What they're saying is that it almost got sucked in, but didn't get quite close enough.



posted on Feb, 12 2005 @ 02:18 PM
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Ok, I made a reply before about the same topic, that thread was closed though since this thread was older.

"If the black hole at the center of the milky way galaxy caused this, I'm surprised this star is still in one piece. The star must have approached the black hole at just the right angle for this to occur. Accoarding to one of the articles the whole galaxy spins around this center black hole, so we must be getting closer and closer? At the same time this black hole must be getting an ever increased mass sucking every star in the galaxy closer and closer at an accelerating pace. The escaping star must be one of the lucky few. Can you say one in a million, or maybe more like one in a trillion?

If the same thing happened to our sun it would provide an interesting way of space travel. The speed at which a star travels through the universe shouldn't affect any of it's properties, maybe there is planets circling this particular star? Someone might be in for one heck of a ride!"


E_T

posted on Feb, 12 2005 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Raabjorn
Accoarding to one of the articles the whole galaxy spins around this center black hole, so we must be getting closer and closer? At the same time this black hole must be getting an ever increased mass sucking every star in the galaxy closer and closer at an accelerating pace.
No, galaxy doesn't rotate around this black hole, it rotates around it's center of mass.
Just same way like (objects in) solar system.
Also that mass was there even before black hole.

And like in our solar system, orbits of objects are in balance between force of gravity and "centrifugal force". For object to make its orbit smaller it has to somehow reduce it's orbital energy (speed), like decrease speed so that force caused by gravity becomes bigger and causes it to fall to smaller orbit until balance is gained. (which happens if object doesn't lose its orbital energy continuously) Same applies to whole galaxy, rotation of matter keeps it from falling toward center of mass (and gravity) unless some force slows that rotation.



posted on Feb, 13 2005 @ 08:10 AM
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Didnt like that star anyway. Your out of here buddy. Go find somwhere else to radiate.



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