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New Texas law means Harvey victims have good reason to file claims by Friday

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posted on Aug, 29 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
Slightly off topic a bit. Never mind insurance claims, just where is FEMA. According to all the doom merchants on here FEMA is supposed to be the all powerful federal group that's going to put everyone in their camps. But what I've seen on the news outlets FEMA is having trouble blowing it's own nose never mind helping the poor people of Texas.


They are here and working already - have been for a couple of days.




posted on Aug, 29 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: TXTriker

originally posted by: violet

originally posted by: Oldtimer2
If you take money in federal aid,you also sign over half of your estate when you die,what a racket,any kind of aid is not free ,even if it is your own tax dollars

Wow, really? Sounds like that reverse mortgage scam.

Like they always say, if it's free or sounds to good to be true, it usually is.



FEMA helps most disaster victims through the Individuals and Households Program (IHP). The IHP can provide temporary shelter in government housing or the money to rent an apartment or house. While you're residing elsewhere, they offer the financial resources to repair or rebuild your home. Funds for medical attention, funeral expenses, transportation needs (including a replacement vehicle), and moving costs are also available. In addition, IHP assistance is there for work or school related essentials like clothing, computers and books. . .

. . . Tax-free money received from IHP is not part of your personal income. Better yet, it's not a loan. You won't have to worry about paying off a troublesome loan as you're rebuilding your life. But IHP money can only be used for disaster-related purposes, so you can't just apply in the hopes of redecorating your house. Just to keep tabs on this provision, FEMA requires that you retain your receipts and bills for three years.
www.legalzoom.com...


I don't see anything there about signing over your house unless it's in this part



You can also think of FEMA as a sort of advance check cashing service. If you're stuck endlessly waiting for an insurance company settlement, you may be eligible for an advance from FEMA. It goes without saying that this money must be repaid once you receive the settlement.

If it's a " loan", good chance you sign your house over as collateral. Like those homeline credit things.



posted on Aug, 29 2017 @ 09:35 PM
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originally posted by: violet

originally posted by: TXTriker

originally posted by: violet

originally posted by: Oldtimer2
If you take money in federal aid,you also sign over half of your estate when you die,what a racket,any kind of aid is not free ,even if it is your own tax dollars

Wow, really? Sounds like that reverse mortgage scam.

Like they always say, if it's free or sounds to good to be true, it usually is.



FEMA helps most disaster victims through the Individuals and Households Program (IHP). The IHP can provide temporary shelter in government housing or the money to rent an apartment or house. While you're residing elsewhere, they offer the financial resources to repair or rebuild your home. Funds for medical attention, funeral expenses, transportation needs (including a replacement vehicle), and moving costs are also available. In addition, IHP assistance is there for work or school related essentials like clothing, computers and books. . .

. . . Tax-free money received from IHP is not part of your personal income. Better yet, it's not a loan. You won't have to worry about paying off a troublesome loan as you're rebuilding your life. But IHP money can only be used for disaster-related purposes, so you can't just apply in the hopes of redecorating your house. Just to keep tabs on this provision, FEMA requires that you retain your receipts and bills for three years.
www.legalzoom.com...


I don't see anything there about signing over your house unless it's in this part



You can also think of FEMA as a sort of advance check cashing service. If you're stuck endlessly waiting for an insurance company settlement, you may be eligible for an advance from FEMA. It goes without saying that this money must be repaid once you receive the settlement.

If it's a " loan", good chance you sign your house over as collateral. Like those homeline credit things.


That's why I posted it - to show its not true. As to the check cashing part, you probably have to sign over whatever part of the insurance proceeds that you are borrowing against.



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