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For Our Texas Members

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posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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Please know we are concerned and hoping for the best possible outcome. And we are worried. They are calling it the "Thousand Year Flood".

Try to check in and let us know how you are. I know BFFT, SeentooMuch, and there are many other Texas members. Also it appears Louisiana is targeted by this nightmare too, so KJ and others, let us know how you are doing.

Oh how I wish I had a big fleet of boats and man power and could come and make rescues! At times like this I feel so helpless.

I want you to know we are concerned, and we do care.

liw




posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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Our Prayers are with Texas.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: ladyinwaiting

If any members from the area see local charities that need help, please let us know who they are. Some give to the Red Cross, which is great, but some other localized groups may be able to do more short term, badly needed work.

Don't let panic replace safety, stuff can be replaced, people cannot.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: ladyinwaiting
First, a star and a flag.
I hope the best for everyone affected down there.

I do have a problem with the media calling it a 'thousand year storm' though.

The 1900 Galveston Hurricane killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people. There was a storm surge of 15 feet associated with that Category 4 storm.

If this is a thousand year storm, what was that storm that happened in 1900?

edit on b000000312017-08-28T11:34:54-05:0011America/ChicagoMon, 28 Aug 2017 11:34:54 -05001100000017 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Oh butcherguy I know. I've watched footage and a documentary on Galveston, and it's absolutely heartbreaking.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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Yeah.

Stay safe.

Stay dry.

Texans.

And move to higher ground for effs sake.

There's no way I'd live on the coast.

NO WAY.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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Nice and timely post.

Thoughts to those having to go through this... members and non members...
- who now have to battle back from losing most things; if not everything.

S&F.
edit on 28-8-2017 by iunlimited491 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: ladyinwaiting
First, a star and a flag.
I hope the best for everyone affected down there.

I do have a problem with the media calling it a 'thousand year storm' though.

The 1900 Galveston Hurricane killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people. There was a storm surge of 15 feet associated with that Category 4 storm.

If this is a thousand year storm, what was that storm that happened in 1900?


While Galveston was aweful, they're likely talking about the amount of rain that's falling. Some places may see 60 inches or 5 feet of rain total. Galveston had a massive loss of live because of the storm surge of 15 feet when the highest point in all of Galveston at the time was less than 9 feet above sea level.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

The first two things I thought of when I saw Harvey headed for Texas were the Galveston hurricane and the biological research facilities along the Texas coast. I hope those facilities are well secured.

That being said, if anyone can handle a major storm it's Texans. I'll bet they are going to show the rest of the US how it's done. You're going to see people rise up to the challenge and make us all proud to call them Americans.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: neo96
Yeah.

Stay safe.

Stay dry.

Texans.

And move to higher ground for effs sake.

There's no way I'd live on the coast.

NO WAY.


No scolding Neo. These people are in trouble. It's their HOME.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: Chromium51

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: ladyinwaiting
First, a star and a flag.
I hope the best for everyone affected down there.

I do have a problem with the media calling it a 'thousand year storm' though.

The 1900 Galveston Hurricane killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people. There was a storm surge of 15 feet associated with that Category 4 storm.

If this is a thousand year storm, what was that storm that happened in 1900?


While Galveston was aweful, they're likely talking about the amount of rain that's falling. Some places may see 60 inches or 5 feet of rain total. Galveston had a massive loss of live because of the storm surge of 15 feet when the highest point in all of Galveston at the time was less than 9 feet above sea level.

I still wonder how they can accurately say that this amount of flooding comes only once in a thousand years. If we go back 500 years, how many flooding storms hit North America for that particular year? How many inches of rain fell on any spot during those storms.
There are no records.
edit on b000000312017-08-28T11:50:18-05:0011America/ChicagoMon, 28 Aug 2017 11:50:18 -05001100000017 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)


(post by manuelram16 removed for political trolling and baiting)

posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: iunlimited491



Thoughts to those having to go through this... members and non members...


thank you, and yes. Non-members too.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: ladyinwaiting

No scolding indeed. I lived in Houston for 25 years and only recently managed to move away to a remote location in West Texas. I'm really of two minds about this storm; the human suffering is staggering and its going to get much worse. Really feel sorry for these people. I"ve managed to stay in touch with many and so far, all are safe. But 2 more days of this is going to really cause havoc; they'll run out of gasoline and food will become critically short. Electricity is apparently in place, mostly, but at some point the potable water system is going to fail. They have been at this for 3 days and are essentially trapped in place and potentially they'll not get relief until Thursday.

Every one wants to lay blame at the feet of the government but honestly........the REAL BLAME lies with the EMPLOYERS! It should have been made obvious after Katrina that no sane employer would headquarter or even have major office operations in Houston.........they should have bailed out long ago and migrated to the Austin/Dallas corridor. ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron, Haliburton, Schlumberger, BP, countless others. Something like, according to CNBC, 3 Million jobs..............the majority of which don't need to be in Houston.

Do the Employers care? No, they could care less about the welfare of their employees. This may be a wake up call. Maybe after losing weeks of productivity and profits they'll finally wake up and get the hell out of there.

In simple terms? This is absolute nonsense! And I have friends who only last week told me that the place is a hell hole and they'd love to leave it and never see it again..........but they're tied up to these crappy jobs trying to raise family's, all the while trapped with lousy services, lousy schools, lousy quality of life, wretched levels of crime.....trapped.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:27 PM
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A Texan here, thanks for the prayers and thoughts. Our nearby creek (south of Houston) was at a record 23 feet plus so many inches higher than normal due to this storm. It's down to 21 feet for now. No flooding for me, yet.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: ladyinwaiting

Hey everybody checking in from Texas. Not sure if any Texas members know but If you have a waffle house go get some food if you're able to. They run on gas.

My brothers apartment is about 4 feet underwater right now Stranded but safe.

Current situation


edit on 28-8-2017 by slapjacks because: pic upload



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

Nope. By your way of thinking, people in California should relocate because of earthquakes, wildfires, and mudslides.

People in Oklahoma and Kansas because of tornados.
People in Florida because of Hurricanes.
People anywhere on the Gulf coast because of Hurricanes.
People in the southeast because of tornados.
People in Montano, Idaho, and Wyoming because of the Yellowstone Volcano.

We don't do that. We don't run. When we have a problem, we fix it, and I hope that doesn't change.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks

Good info, thanks. I hope your brother is okay. So sorry. It has to be so difficult to lose everything you have in a few hours.






posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: Chromium51

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: ladyinwaiting
First, a star and a flag.
I hope the best for everyone affected down there.

I do have a problem with the media calling it a 'thousand year storm' though.

The 1900 Galveston Hurricane killed between 6,000 and 12,000 people. There was a storm surge of 15 feet associated with that Category 4 storm.

If this is a thousand year storm, what was that storm that happened in 1900?


While Galveston was aweful, they're likely talking about the amount of rain that's falling. Some places may see 60 inches or 5 feet of rain total. Galveston had a massive loss of live because of the storm surge of 15 feet when the highest point in all of Galveston at the time was less than 9 feet above sea level.

I still wonder how they can accurately say that this amount of flooding comes only once in a thousand years. If we go back 500 years, how many flooding storms hit North America for that particular year? How many inches of rain fell on any spot during those storms.
There are no records.


Agreed, they say it because it gets viewers but they come up with the number based on an algorithm of how frequently the event could occur. I'm actually on a weather forum and a year ago or so someone posted an article about how the weather service actually comes up with it, it was a pretty interesting read.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: LookingForABetterLife
A Texan here, thanks for the prayers and thoughts. Our nearby creek (south of Houston) was at a record 23 feet plus so many inches higher than normal due to this storm. It's down to 21 feet for now. No flooding for me, yet.



It's down? I hope it's starting to recede then? Take care, and stay safe.



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