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Seventy-one T-45s left in path of hurricane

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posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:05 PM
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The US Navy has 71 of the 99 T-45s based at NAS Kingsville are stuck in hangars, waiting out Hurricane Harvey. The Navy flew out the aircraft that were considered airworthy, and that had pilots to Joint Base Fort Worth to ride out the storm, but that only wound up being 28 of them. They were flown to the base below 10,000 feet to prevent any oxygen system problems. For some reason instead of the pilots returning to Kingsville, and flying more aircraft out, they left the remaining aircraft in place, sheltered in hangars on the base.

The base is somewhat inland, so shouldn't have to deal with storm surge, but they're expecting 35 inches of rain in some areas, before the storm is done. The forecast calls for rain at the base until Tuesday, which is going to put a lot of water into the area. They're currently under a tropical storm warning. NAS Kingsville is only about 75 miles from where the storm came ashore in Rockport, Texas. That means there's potential for significant damage on the base.


WASHINGTON ― Scores of the Navy’s T-45 trainer jets were unable to evacuate Naval Air Station Kingsville and remain directly in the path of what is projected to be the worst hurricane to hit South Texas in decades.

On Thursday, NAS Kingsville, which houses 99 of the Navy’s 197 T-45 primary jet trainers, evacuated all airworthy aircraft ― if there was also a qualified pilot to fly.

But only 28 of Kingsville’s T-45s were determined to be airworthy, or to have a qualified pilot available, in order to evacuate the jets to Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, said spokesman Kevin Clarke.

www.airforcetimes.com...




posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:15 PM
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Any possibility that the Navy really dislikes these. Leaving them to get mashed perhaps?

Is it Navy month? Ships crashing, Osprey crashes and now, leave the aircraft behind.

What is going on in the navy.

P



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

I don't know what's going on. It's only a hop skip and a jump from Kingsville to Fort Worth. They easily could have had a C-130 or something fly them back down to pick up another batch of aircraft and moved them, or at least most of them.



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Not knowing anything to speak of about aircraft am I right that these are used to train new pilots?

Could it be a not enough money in the budget issue and they had to prioritize what was moved, concentrating more on combat aircraft?



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Yes, they're trainers, and have been having horrific oxygen system issues in the last few years. To the point that students aren't allowed to fly them, except under extremely limited and useless conditions. They use these to teach carrier landings on ships, as well as basic pilot training in jets.

It could be a budget thing. We're approaching the end of the Fiscal Year, and getting to the point where units are low on funding for pretty much everything.
edit on 8/26/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 11:21 PM
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Thanks for the info...

Personally, I'm more concerned about the Nuclear Plant, the refineries, superfund sites and other infrastructure damage ....



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd




Personally, I'm more concerned about the Nuclear Plant, the refineries, superfund sites and other infrastructure damage ....


Then start your own thread.



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

None of which have to do with aviation, which is the forum this is posted in.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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Yikes! My favorite trainer. Hopefully a majority remain in good shape.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 01:08 AM
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a reply to: Theprimevoyager

How could you like that more than the talon



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

From the way you describe them, I'd expect them to be a low priority. Interesting all the same that they did not move more of them.

From everything I'm reading lately, it certainly seems to be the case that new aircraft are badly needed and should be a major priority. Being CTer minded, my head goes to is there a hidden reason behind them being left in harms way, maybe even hoping they get destroyed.

Being able to say look at all the planes destroyed by the storm, might somehow make it easier to get the funding flowing. I'm probably reading too much into that.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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I'm in Texas and the weather service here is now predicting as much as 50 inches of rain over the next few days. Bye-bye trainers.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 03:07 PM
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I guess they have enough good drainage....or they steer them babies......like Katrina......naw just tangential out loud......long as there ain't no FB 111-F's being bully'd.....ya know, I want one of those.....just cool,looking, I mean the f111's.....



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 03:38 PM
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I was stationed at Whiting Field in the mid 90s when we had two hurricanes in rapid succession. We flew all the aircraft out we could. Every instructor flew an aircraft out, mainly to Jacksonville. The base commander had to waive takeoff minimums at one point due to the deteriorating weather. Students were used to help rapidly preflight the aircraft. I don't remember if we had enough instructors to get all the planes out.
I am not sure what happened in this case, but given that the aircraft have been down for awhile due to maintenance, there may not have been many instructors available to fly. It may be a case of instructors being sent to other duty until the maintenance gets sorted out?



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 03:52 PM
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Wow is there anyone in charge of Military Operations in America that can organize a piss up in a brewery

After Obamas hatchet job /Cull of people in command , the hens are coming home to roost .

Looking at the Captain of the John Macain destroyer never left me feeling confident , and after the incident in the black sea with the Russian jet versus destroyer , i really fear for America as a republic .

Reagan knocked down a wall , Trump is trying to build one



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

While there is definitely part of me that agrees with you, that part is warring with the part of me that says they have been grounded so long most can't fly without a check flight first. But your feeling makes a ton of sense.

When I said they've had horrible problems with their oxygen system, that was kind of like saying the ocean is wet. They were grounded for 30+ days due to the oxygen system, while they came up with a plan to solve it. One of the first flights with the new mask they decided to go with, saw an instructor report the same symptoms they were trying to fix. So now they're relegated to flying below 10,000 feet, and no more than 2.5Gs, as well as below a certain speed. Thanks to their problems, at least two full classes of new pilots have been delayed several months. And they still don't know what's going on with the O2 system.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


" So now they're relegated to flying below 10,000 feet"

Gonna have to float first.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

You're probably right and I don't follow this stuff. My head just sort of automatically goes to follow the money these days.

It seems from the news that sequestration has wreaked havoc with out military readiness.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

There's the very real possibility that it's a combination of the two. There were always whispered stories many years ago about how aircraft that were maintenence intensive always seemed conveniently broken when there was an evacuation ordered.

It did. Oh god it did. We need to get spending under control, I fully agree, but Jesus Christ I've never seen readiness rates so screwed up as they have been since that bill was passed.
edit on 8/28/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 09:06 AM
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When I was teaching in Kingsville, we would have hurrevac'd these out in a heartbeat. Jamming them into the hangars seems an odd decision. And trust me, they have waaaaaay more than 28 pilots. They have 2 squadrons down there and at least 50 IPs.

The only thing I could think was the combination of bad O2 systems and the hurricane, that instructors basically opted out of taking jets away, and CNATRA was forced to hangar them.

Hope they make it. Fun jet to fly.

Cosmo




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