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Buying a Kayak ultra newb

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posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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Anyone on here experienced with Kayaks??,

I had no idea I have a fantastic network of waterways on my door step that are perfect for kayaking.

I have never had any experience with the sports so will be starting from fresh, I hear it is fairly basic to get going and then just a game of technique over time. I guess I would be in the category of recreational.. Looking at my local maps I have a fairly long route that takes me into some really quite locations and would be idea for some stealth camping in the bivy.


I was at first attracted to a inflatable option but I have a small camper van that would easily fit a hard shell single Kayak with room to spare so I think this would be the option I go with..

Model I was looking was this,

www.riberproducts.com...


Camo seems to be a nice option, stealthy when tucked away as well..

www.ebay.co.uk... 5157310&poi=&googleloc=9044959&device=c&campaignid=862328541&crdt=0


Any advice on what to look for etc or experience greatly appreciated..


RA




posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: slider1982

Another outdoor enthusiast!!!


I have only used a kayak once and although it was very cool,I wouldn't do a trip with one.
The one I used was a sit on top type,which was fast and light but you are limited to what you can carry.
Being a bit of a minimalist,that is all good...but when I have a bigger trip,the canoe has been a good friend.

I like having options so an ultra light canoe has been the way to go for me.

I wish I knew more about kayaks to give you an idea on what to buy but I don't.

Good luck....watch out for bigfoot!!


Edit to add...
www.swiftcanoe.com...
They sell kayaks as well as ultra light canoes.
edit on 26-8-2017 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: slider1982

I've actually been looking at canoes the past couple of weeks.

Why are you going the kayak route, type of waterways, or any particular reason?
edit on 26-8-2017 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:18 AM
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I prefer sit on top ocean style. The sit in ones like to sink, when its cold, and I have a backpack on, and water floods in.
If you are carrying any more than fishing gear, a canoe is the way to row.imo

Read up on shapes. Because some are wide and stable, but slow, while the long skinny ones are fast, and the bow doesn't steer the opposite of your paddle as bad, so more energy moves you forward per stroke.

You kinda have to pick the style for the usage. A fast and long ocean style sucks for fishing in and around river structure, while the stubby, stable one is best, but horrible for distance.

edit on 8 by Mandroid7 because: added2



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: slider1982

I've actually been looking at canoes the past couple of weeks.

Why are you going the kayak route, type of waterways, or any particular reason?



Well the waterways I can use from central London out to Hertfordshire "River Lea" (I am told) are good for Kayaking, The long and short is that I am a very keen cyclist but have a badly sprained ankle and doing nothing is driving me up the wall and it has only been 48 hours!!!...

Also sizing seems to be different from a Canoe to Kayak but that is just having a quick flick through online, I would also not not want a kneeling position as some canoes seem to promote.

Just thinking of being able to lash a dry bag with a Outdoor Research Bivy with a MSR pocket rocket and sleeping bag will give lots of adventure potential..


RA



edit on 26-8-2017 by slider1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: slider1982




I am a very keen cyclist


A cyclist as well as an outdoor enthusiast??
We sound like the same animal.





Keep the bike light...you might need to carry it.


A big
to those MSR stoves.

This is from last weekend.


Heal that ankle and get back out there!



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 11:32 AM
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Are the waterways mostly calm, or more like rapids? If the latter, definitely a kayak.

Most of the canoes I have seen have seats, or "benches," on which you sit, whereas in a kayak you either sit on your knees, which would be very uncomfortable for a long period of time, or on your butt with your legs extended, which would also be uncomfortable, and you'd be more or less immobile for long periods of time.

I would also think it would be easier to haul and stow gear, or a pack, with a canoe, rather than stuffing it inside a kayak.

Once again, I guess it depends on the waterways you're traveling.



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: DrumsRfun


Edit to add...
www.swiftcanoe.com...
They sell kayaks as well as ultra light canoes.


Those are some beautiful canoes.



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 12:11 PM
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We have sit on top ocean style kayaks that have fairly big waterproof compartments in the bow. They are great handling waves on big lakes like Tahoe. But not as fast and streamlined as some calm water kayaks, so more energy is need for long paddles.

Adding a clip on seat with back support is a must imo. Have never used them for overnight camping but the storage would easily hold my backpacking tent and sleeping bag plus more, basically could fit everything from a large backpack in them.
edit on 26-8-2017 by bluesjr because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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I've been into whitewater kayaking and lake/whitewater canoeing for many years, they're both fun and enjoyable. Some more info would be nice as to; water conditions, distance of trips, fishing, distance porting boat, etc...? Boats with more rocker turn quicker and are not as suitable for touring. If you're doing lengthy trips in flat water, you'll want to eliminate as many corrective strokes as you can. Entry level kayaks are going to be a little cheaper than a good canoe (Don't buy a cheap canoe, you'll hate it). They both have their pros and cons. What are most of the other locals using?

The kayak your looking at would be more of a casual short day, small lake/pond paddler and not for lengthy touring on larger lakes or waterways. 293cm is fairly short for travels of much length.
edit on 26-8-2017 by mtnshredder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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originally posted by: mtnshredder
I've been into whitewater kayaking and lake/whitewater canoeing for many years, they're both fun and enjoyable. Some more info would be nice as to; water conditions, distance of trips, fishing, distance porting boat, etc...? Boats with more rocker turn quicker and are not as suitable for touring. If you're doing lengthy trips in flat water, you'll want to eliminate as many corrective strokes as you can. Entry level kayaks are going to be a little cheaper than a good canoe (Don't buy a cheap canoe, you'll hate it). They both have their pros and cons. What are most of the other locals using?

The kayak your looking at would be more of a casual short day, small lake/pond paddler and not for lengthy touring on larger lakes or waterways. 293cm is fairly short for travels of much length.


Water way or canals certainly nothing "white water" bascially just on the ancient waterways of London and Essex, Distance 1 mile to 20+ I guess or when I get tired, I do not mean touring simply fixing a 10l dry bag to the hull and spending a night dodging the local youths, Micro adventure if you will, I bike pack and it is amazing just how little weight my sleeping and cooking kit weighs...

I will be firmly in suburbs rather ass end of nowhere..


overall just looking for a upper body workout for a few hours and the option of a cheeky overnight bivy stop just off the water way..


RA



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: slider1982

originally posted by: mtnshredder
I've been into whitewater kayaking and lake/whitewater canoeing for many years, they're both fun and enjoyable. Some more info would be nice as to; water conditions, distance of trips, fishing, distance porting boat, etc...? Boats with more rocker turn quicker and are not as suitable for touring. If you're doing lengthy trips in flat water, you'll want to eliminate as many corrective strokes as you can. Entry level kayaks are going to be a little cheaper than a good canoe (Don't buy a cheap canoe, you'll hate it). They both have their pros and cons. What are most of the other locals using?

The kayak your looking at would be more of a casual short day, small lake/pond paddler and not for lengthy touring on larger lakes or waterways. 293cm is fairly short for travels of much length.


Water way or canals certainly nothing "white water" bascially just on the ancient waterways of London and Essex, Distance 1 mile to 20+ I guess or when I get tired, I do not mean touring simply fixing a 10l dry bag to the hull and spending a night dodging the local youths, Micro adventure if you will, I bike pack and it is amazing just how little weight my sleeping and cooking kit weighs...

I will be firmly in suburbs rather ass end of nowhere..


overall just looking for a upper body workout for a few hours and the option of a cheeky overnight bivy stop just off the water way..


RA


If your doing milage I would strongly suggest something like the boat in the link I posted. It has drop down skegs for tracking and is longer and a lil narrower for speed. They're a little more money ( not sure of your budget) but would be worth the investment if it something you think you would stick with. Kayaking and canoeing was a huge addiction for me so beware. LOL.

The boats you're looking at are short and wide and are going to be slow and not track so great which translates to a lot more corrective strokes and a lot more effort paddling. I think when the honeymoon wears off you'll wish you had a different boat. They would work for putting around but not to good for paddling distances you're talking about, 1-20 mi. JMHO

I wouldn't rule out some Sit On Tops either, some are pretty nice.

www.dagger.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

I also prefer the sit-on style kayak, although I only own a sit-in style kayak.




posted on Aug, 26 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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edit on 8/26/2017 by MotherMayEye because: Feel like I posted enough info to identify me. =(



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 03:06 AM
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I just went on a huge kayak info gathering spree.

If you want to haul a lot of gear, get a touring kayak or possibly a sit on top.

Don't get a rec boat (the kind you're looking at). They don't have bulkheads, and if you flip they fill up with water.

I picked up a sit on top for messing around this summer, but am probably buying a touring kayak soon. This is the one I'm looking at.

Sit on tops are slower, don't track as well, but are more stable and easier to right if you flip.
If you're going to be in open ocean or have larger waves/wind get a touring or sea kayak at least 15 feet long.

Go take a class, I think that's the best way to learn and the best way to get experience.

-----

I just read your second reply. If you don't plan on carrying much gear (10 L is TINY) or going anywhere but calm slow moving rivers and lakes, I'd look into a sit on top.

You probably won't be going 20 miles, especially at first, and not in a recreational boat or sit on top.

Do you have a budget?
edit on 2720170820171 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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Hobie peddle kayak ftw, bit more expensive but worth it. a reply to: slider1982



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 10:50 PM
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originally posted by: Domo1
I just went on a huge kayak info gathering spree.

If you want to haul a lot of gear, get a touring kayak or possibly a sit on top.

Don't get a rec boat (the kind you're looking at). They don't have bulkheads, and if you flip they fill up with water.

I picked up a sit on top for messing around this summer, but am probably buying a touring kayak soon. This is the one I'm looking at.

Sit on tops are slower, don't track as well, but are more stable and easier to right if you flip.
If you're going to be in open ocean or have larger waves/wind get a touring or sea kayak at least 15 feet long.

Go take a class, I think that's the best way to learn and the best way to get experience.

-----

I just read your second reply. If you don't plan on carrying much gear (10 L is TINY) or going anywhere but calm slow moving rivers and lakes, I'd look into a sit on top.

You probably won't be going 20 miles, especially at first, and not in a recreational boat or sit on top.

Do you have a budget?


That's a really nice boat Domo.
Wilderness Systems makes some nice stuff. If I were to get a touring boat that would for sure be on the radar.



posted on Aug, 27 2017 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: mtnshredder

Glad you said so! I might get something shorter, but I 'd really love to go out around the San Jaun islands again. Went for two weeks when I was a teenager and it was freaking awesome.

At the same time, I don't know if I want something that big. I'm looking into getting a roof rack for my pickup, since I want to be able to fill up the bed with other crap if I take the boat camping with me.

Getting these SOTs really rekindled my love for kayaking. It's one of my all time favorite feelings, along with being on a horse and snowboarding. Something about melding into your surroundings and being a part of them while you feel like you're gliding. I need to buy a mountain with a horse ranch and gigantic lake.



posted on Aug, 28 2017 @ 01:30 AM
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originally posted by: Domo1
a reply to: mtnshredder



Getting these SOTs really rekindled my love for kayaking. It's one of my all time favorite feelings, along with being on a horse and snowboarding. Something about melding into your surroundings and being a part of them while you feel like you're gliding. I need to buy a mountain with a horse ranch and gigantic lake.


Yes, kayaking is awesome for the soul, not much like it. Some of the canyons we paddled would have Eagles that would sore above us and hang with us a ways down the river, Deer and Big Horn Sheep on the shore and canyon walls and an occasional Bear. Paddling's very therapeutic for the head.

San Juan Islands would be an incredible adventure. I've seen pics of people paddling with Orcas around SJI, beautiful there.
edit on 28-8-2017 by mtnshredder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2017 @ 01:36 AM
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Just a bit of a update if anyone looks at this thread years from now,

Well on Monday just gone I actually rented a Kayak for a few hours and headed out onto streams and local canals, I must say within about 30 mins I had a decent understanding of what I was doing and was able to at least track straight with only slight fish tailing.

The Kayak was a Dagger Fiesta or from what the guy said it was a Islander Fiesta which is made by Dagger out of recycled material, size wise was under 10 foot and for what I want at the moment I think I would be able to get a dry bag attached without issue, the cockpit is large and I never felt as if the Kayak was unstable.

Due to the size of my Camper van I really needed a Kayak under 10 foot so to fit within the vehicle, this model does that.

All in I think it could be a really good option to add to the sport I already do, I would urge anyone thinking of giving Kayaking a shot to get out there, I certainly was not fatigued like I would have expected and could quite easily do a 10+ miles trip in the craft I was in.

Link to Kayak model
www.norfolkmarine.co.uk...


Looking at a few maps there are uncountable waterways I can use the craft on, the only issue I can see is having to portage the locks we have locally..



RA
edit on 31-8-2017 by slider1982 because: sp




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