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Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck

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(post by MOMof3 removed for political trolling and baiting)
(post by face23785 removed for a manners violation)

posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: face23785

People can waste books trying to convince liars. We're past that.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:03 PM
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a reply to: toysforadultswhere do you go to find this 6 figure salary you speak i live in the south and only lawyers and doctors make that kinda money. most people in this country if you asked everyone or cracked open irs recods probly make in the 4 to 5 figure range why because govfor the lat 25 years have let most of the manurfacturing jobs leave the country but bring there products to sell here with out tariff fees.




posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
The left sneers at blue collar jobs. Heck, you are even doing it now. Remember all the polls about how conservative voters are not as "educated?" Those on the right recognize college isn't for everyone and there is nothing wrong with gaining a vocational skill. For many people, the ROI is much higher than going to college.


Problem is, if you're not educated on a subject you can't knowingly vote on it. And my attitude comes from the fact that I want people to be better. Every single person who gives up and works a forklift, or becomes a mechanic, or a truck driver, is a strike against this countries education system. Those are people that we failed because we didn't give them a better option.

I don't believe the argument that college isn't for everyone for an instant. If college isn't for everyone, then high school isn't for everyone either, and every grade below that isn't for some. That's not a belief society has embraced though. If people need high school, then they should need college given the need for specialization in life. If college were compulsory, I predict that you would see people drop out in their senior of college, instead of the way they drop out of high school now.

People only drop out of education because we give them the option to do so and instill in them that they can make their own choices at 18. If we cut back on that, people would become higher educated.

As far as ROI goes, that only applies to people who pick bad majors, and if we did a better job of covering the costs of college the ROI could come down a lot, while still making it the better choice. That's purely an artificial problem.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: Greven
Remember Romney's 47% of Americans don't pay income taxes comment?
That included people on Social Security under the income limit.


Know who else it included? It was a metric of how many people take more from the system than they put in. Every local, state, and federal worker draws their entire salary from the tax base but only put back a fraction of that. Every teacher, road builder, etc... is part of that 47%



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: kyleplatinum

Moving should not be an option. What's the point of a city, if no one can afford to live in it?

And if you don't like that argument, then how about an economic one: Time has value. If you're commuting, you're essentially working a second job for however many hours a week, and your wage is the savings difference between living in the city and living in a suburb. For most people, this results in long hours (a much longer effective working week), for only a small percentage increase in income.

If you're trying to save $1000/month on rent, and in exchange you gained a 1 hour commute in each direction that's 520 hours per year for $12000. Then there's fuel costs (about 4 gallons of gas per day), and additional maintenance (say, another $1000/year) you're now only ahead by $7,000 or $13.46 per hour. It's not a very good deal.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Fair enough.

I rent a 2-bedroom flat for £600 a month and it leaves me with about £1,300. I can probably live on half of that and can save.

I know people who earn more than me and struggle more, because they have to have a big fancy place, and a big flash car. they go out every weekend and throw money around like they're millionaires.

But they're the same people who smoke and mope around asking other people for cigarettes. I see people earn far more than me, have fewer responsibilities but project this image as if they're minor local celebrities.

But you made a good point - I live in a small city. Don't get me wrong, I ain't a cheapskate. I could rent a bigger place but I could also rent a smaller or cheaper place. I'm about mid-level but I've worked at dropping bad habits over the last few years.

I stopped smokin and drinking, stopped doing some...uh, other things. So I'm speaking from experience of people I know, but you're right - not everywhere is the same so fair point.

Many thanks.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: LungFuMoShi

Do you have to pay for medical insurance then half the medical charges too? Do you have to have a car and insurance to get to work? Where you live?



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: proteus33
a reply to: toysforadultswhere do you go to find this 6 figure salary you speak i live in the south and only lawyers and doctors make that kinda money. most people in this country if you asked everyone or cracked open irs recods probly make in the 4 to 5 figure range why because govfor the lat 25 years have let most of the manurfacturing jobs leave the country but bring there products to sell here with out tariff fees.



You'll never make 6 figures doing a manufacturing job. The company I work for is among the better paying companies for that type of work, and we top out at something like $20/hour. Since most plants are in small towns, that tends to be a pretty good wage still, and the employees can live on it. But they'll never be financially independent on that type of money.

In my case, my internship this past summer (my first real job ever) started at $60/hour writing software for that company. After the internship ended, I got a raise and a permanent position jumping me to $85/hour, they were even willing to accomodate dropping me from full to part time so I could finish my schooling while working.

Honestly, pretty much any software job has the option to start at 100k if you're willing to work in NYC or SV. If you work in the middle of the country, those jobs still exist too but they're rarer. You just need to know how to do it. In my case, my salary ended up being on the extreme high end because I have 5 degrees, I'm working on degree #6 (probably my final one, though I said that about #5 too...) and they're all relevant to my position.

Going to college isn't going to guarantee you a job, or a good wage, but it helps to tip the scales in your favor. I can say this after having spent the last 14 years living on $9,000/year while studying. I'm well acquainted with being poor in the US.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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I think that's a big part of it for many people, though.

Trying to be flash and impress people. I don't buy expensive phones, I don't own a car but if I wanted a car I wouldn't want an incredibly expensive car.

I don't really like that kind of attention.

The person I mentioned in my initial post - my cousin, he has this mercedes, he dresses like a hollywood celebrity and it's all courtesy of the bank of mum and dad. He's in debt, every weekend he posts pictures on facebook of him and his friends "on it" as they so eloquently put it.

Has kids, his rent is probably not far off mine - courtesy of the government and mugs like me.

He always has new clothes, he gets a fancy haircut every second week. Flash jewelry...nothing is ever low or mid-level it's always the best of stuff.

I see this everywhere...a phone is a phone, but people don't ant just a phone, they want the latest iphone and 1,000 minutes a month.

They don't just want a pair of Nike, they want the latest, most expensive pair. It's all about image...I see people struggle but still able to project and maintain this image.

I don't watch tv...I wonder if that has anything to do with it. I'm not trying to be like anyone, or to impress anyone...my life's mostly about working and being reasonably happy and content. People laugh at me when I pull out my phone - at least I won't break down and cry when I lose it for the 20th time because I paid £40 for it.

It really fries my noodle when I hear these kind of people beg for cigarettes when they have versace sunglasses and an £800 phone.

It's pretty bizarre...something is making people narcissistic. It's all about lookin as though they're doing better than everyone else when on closer inspection they're scraping by and winging it from month to month.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: kyleplatinum



And if you don't like that argument


I don't like any of your arguments.

You think much differently, and that's ok.

6 figures is plenty, anywhere.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: MOMof3

I don't need a car, i travel by public transport when I have to and made sure I got a flat that's within walking distance to my job as I'm on call.

I pay national insurance which is taken directly from my wage. I pay into a pension plan.

Pay for simple things, internet, food, no contract phone I'm still PAYG. I don't buy expensive clothes or anything but I'm always well dressed.

My only real vice these days is buying expensive or rare books and comics, occasionally I'll buy some gym equipment. I don't really want much, just to be comfortable.

It's nice knowing that if something happens where I need funds quickly I can deal with it. I make some sacrifices but I'm content with my lot.

No drugs, drink...dropped my bad habits. I wasn't always like this - I used to struggle because I was stupid with money. It took a few years but I identified the problems and worked on resolving them. I'm a lot less stressed out and happier.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: LungFuMoShi

This is something a lot of people in many Western countries should take to heart. You're doing about right as far as what you rent, around 1/3rd of your income. I know people that their rent or mortgage takes up more than half their income. That's ridiculous. And they absolutely do not need such an expensive place, they could rent or buy something more modest and still live comfortably. They just have the attitude of "I shouldn't have to". Nobody is entitled to their dream home, dream car, dream job, etc etc.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: kyleplatinum

No, I'm just familiar with bad neighborhoods. Like I just said, I just finished spending 14 years living on $9000/year. What that means is I was living in the bad neighborhoods. In the town I live in, we have one of the highest crime rates per capita in the US, and I live in the worst of the towns neighborhoods. It is so bad, that the police don't even attempt to investigate half the stuff. The area is so poor we have payday loan vendors in our supermarkets so that people can buy food, local restaurants have bars on the windows, and if you have air conditioning, your AC unit for your house will be caged and cemented into the ground.

In the past three years I've lived in this town I have had people try to kick my door open in the middle of the night 5 times (I actually have to barricade my door). My AC unit has been stolen 3 times (twice before it was caged, once after... they actually brought a torch to take it). My car has been vandalized twice. My apartment has been broken into in the daytime once. My neighbors run a literal opium den out of their house (and the cops don't care as long as they keep it off the street). I have seen an actual gang war happen outside my window. Homeless people go through my trash (and that of everyone else on the street) in the middle of the night on a daily basis on the back alley, while other homeless people check cars for unlocked doors to steal things out of on the street.

I'm well acquainted with bad neighborhoods. No one should have to degrade their housing quality to where they have to live in that type of neighborhood to get by. If that's what it takes for adults to get by without roommates, at any income level... then something is very wrong.

To live in a decent neighborhood in a large city, that's what is required.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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I'll give you an example.

Before I stopped smoking about a year ago I started smoking tobacco because it was a bit cheaper.

I was in work and one of the regular people asked me for a cigarette and I told them I'd stopped buying cigarettes and offered her my pouch of tobacco and told her she could keep it, I was quitting.

She refused it...actually said to me "I ain't smoking rollups!"

The person I'm talking about was a manager, probably earned twice as much as me.

Owned an expensive handbag, carried it to work every day. To look at her you'd think she was a super model, all flash, flash car, flash sunglasses...out living the high life every weekend then scadging smokes off people at work.

Tobacco wasn't good enough...she opted to do without because she thought she was above smoking tobacco. I'll never understand people like that.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

If you have to have roommates until you can work your way up into a better situation, get some roommates. Honestly in the choice between living in a violent neighborhood and living with a roommate you choose the former?



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: Chromium51
Apparently I'm doing prettt ok.. just turned 27, I have a 300k house, have a new jeep rubicon and an older one to offroad, my girlfriend has a 12 grand Cherokee limited.. and I just dropped 40k cash on a kitchen remodel.. if you live paycheck to paycheck that's your own fault.. also
I don't have a college degree


And how much of that is fully paid off?

All of it except the house.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: face23785
a reply to: LungFuMoShi

This is something a lot of people in many Western countries should take to heart. You're doing about right as far as what you rent, around 1/3rd of your income. I know people that their rent or mortgage takes up more than half their income. That's ridiculous. And they absolutely do not need such an expensive place, they could rent or buy something more modest and still live comfortably. They just have the attitude of "I shouldn't have to". Nobody is entitled to their dream home, dream car, dream job, etc etc.


Maybe there is nothing cheaper?

Housing prices just go up and up.

cost of living continues to skyrocket, more and more wealth is created, but it all stolen & hoarded by those already rich, like executives, bankers, lobbyists etc.

The most offensive thing is the layoffs, cutbacks, and wage reductions suffered by workers while executive bonuses at the same company increase year after year.

It just demonstrates how the rich view those beneath them.



posted on Aug, 25 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: LungFuMoShi

We don't have mass transportation. Just in a few cities. Rent is 3/4 of most working people income. Not much left for drugs, medical or illicit. My three kids work and try as hard as they can.




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